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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Susan Curtis and John Williams

Increasing numbers of full‐time undergraduates are supplementing their income by seeking paid employment during term‐time. This article details the results of a survey of…

6590

Abstract

Increasing numbers of full‐time undergraduates are supplementing their income by seeking paid employment during term‐time. This article details the results of a survey of 368 students at Crewe + Alsager Faculty of Manchester Metropolitan University carried out in March 2000. The survey found that 59 per cent of students were working on a part‐time basis during term‐time, with a significant majority working for financial reasons. Although many students found working to be beneficial to their studies, the students are generally reluctant to work, with many stating that they would leave their paid employment if they could afford to do so. The majority of the employed students perceived that working had a detrimental effect on their academic studies and a quarter of them considered that they could not remain at university without their term‐time jobs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Susan Curtis

Numerous publications are available to help reference librarians answer their clients' questions on meteorological conditions in specific regions of the world. Here, Susan

Abstract

Numerous publications are available to help reference librarians answer their clients' questions on meteorological conditions in specific regions of the world. Here, Susan Curtis reviews several such materials.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Chris Sugnet

The automation process has a tendency to reveal strengths and weaknesses in a library, its management style, its organizational structure, and the abilities of its staff…

Abstract

The automation process has a tendency to reveal strengths and weaknesses in a library, its management style, its organizational structure, and the abilities of its staff members. What are the educational and training requirements needed by professional librarians to manage effectively the automation process? This question is discussed by representatives of five major library vendors: Michel Ridgeway and Dean Gattone (Geac), Alison Curtis, (Utlas), Susan Olson (OCLC), James J. Michael (Data Research Associates), and Gene Robinson (CLSI). They stress the need for a solid foundation in management and communication skills, and a commitment to continuing education. Technology changes so rapidly that detailed knowledge of a current system is less important than knowing how to evaluate the capabilities of a future system.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2003

Susan Curtis

Discusses undergraduates and funding of higher education in the United Kingdom. States that the proposed fee payments by students were not unexpected, as there had been…

411

Abstract

Discusses undergraduates and funding of higher education in the United Kingdom. States that the proposed fee payments by students were not unexpected, as there had been much debate previously. Gives the results of research undertaken in North America. Concludes that the pressures on students will only increase, with detrimental effects.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Susan Curtis

Discusses the results of a survey on aspects of the student experience of university at a semi‐rural faculty of a metropolitan university in England. The research found…

2274

Abstract

Discusses the results of a survey on aspects of the student experience of university at a semi‐rural faculty of a metropolitan university in England. The research found that students tend to be amassing considerable debts, have little financial parental support and some are dependent on wages from part‐time work as a source of funds. It would appear that there is some financial hardship among the students surveyed, with a significant minority paying their own tuition fees. It is a possibility that these students would not be able to afford the higher top‐up tuition fees proposed for 2006. However, it is suggested that, for most students, there is a good social life, and university remains an enjoyable experience.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Susan Curtis

Owing to increasing debts and lack of parental contribution to undergraduates' income, UK students are taking paid employment during term time in order to finance their…

7396

Abstract

Purpose

Owing to increasing debts and lack of parental contribution to undergraduates' income, UK students are taking paid employment during term time in order to finance their studies. The aim of this investigation is to explore employed and non‐employed students' perceptions of the impact of this paid employment on the university experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 336 undergraduates completed questionnaires about their employment, their perceptions of the effects on academic study, factors affecting the decision to work and factors which may reduce the amount of time spent studying.

Findings

Results indicated that almost 59 per cent of students were employed during term time for an average of 15 hours per week. More students perceived that there were benefits to working than perceived disadvantages, but there were some contradictions concerning the adverse effects of working.

Research limitation/implications

The findings were limited by the location of the sample, as they were from a rural faculty of a large university and are therefore not typical of most UK student populations which are generally in urban locations.

Practical implications

There is no simple solution to the problem of employed students experiencing adverse effects on their academic studies due to working. The government and other stakeholders need to take responsibility for the current situation.

Originality/value

This study adds to the growing body of international data that reports on the effects of user‐pays approach in higher education. No other study has considered the perceptions of non‐employed students alongside the employed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Susan Curtis and Dennis Wright

Outlines the make‐up and role of ACAS. Considers the different areas of their work i.e. collective conciliation, advisory services, individual conciliation, and promotion…

Abstract

Outlines the make‐up and role of ACAS. Considers the different areas of their work i.e. collective conciliation, advisory services, individual conciliation, and promotion work. Discusses each in turn before speculating on the future for ACAS, suggesting that it needs to keep pace with the changing nature of work. Cites that the body is attempting an arbitration alternative to the legalistic employment tribunal.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Susan Curtis and Dennis Wright

Considers the reasons for a high turnover of staff in different industries before looking at the nature of commitment. Provides some areas where improvements can lead to…

7701

Abstract

Considers the reasons for a high turnover of staff in different industries before looking at the nature of commitment. Provides some areas where improvements can lead to enhanced employee commitment and briefly looks at these issues in turn, e.g. pay, benefits, flexible work options and career development and training. Concludes that policies to encourage commitment need to become inherent within the culture of the organization to be successful.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Susan Curtis

To investigate the attitudes of academic staff towards providing practical support for full‐time students working on a part‐time basis during term‐time.

2005

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the attitudes of academic staff towards providing practical support for full‐time students working on a part‐time basis during term‐time.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a rural faculty of a large metropolitan university in the UK. In‐depth semi‐structured interviews were held with 22 members of staff, drawn from every department in the case study faculty.

Findings

Support for working students is arbitrary and accidental. The majority of staff are unaware of the extent of student employment and of the possibilities of providing support.

Research limitations/implications

Only a small proportion of the total university staff were interviewed, coupled with the fact that the faculty is rural and therefore the sample may not be representative of the majority of universities which have city centre campuses.

Practical implications

Improved awareness of students' total university experience on the part of academics may encourage practical measures to assist the undergraduates to cope more effectively with their dual roles of student and worker. However, some forms of support, such as greater flexibility in the timetable, may be very difficult, if not impossible, to accommodate.

Originality/value

No other research appears to have been carried out in the UK on this topic.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Susan Curtis and Rita Klapper

To investigate how the financial status of students in England and France affects their experience of university life.

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Abstract

Purpose

To investigate how the financial status of students in England and France affects their experience of university life.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out among undergraduates in two countries. There were 168 responses from students studying at a French university and 325 responses from students studying at an English university.

Findings

The financial burden in France rests with parents, while in England students are largely responsible for their own funding. Indicators suggest that English students may be suffering from financial difficulties. Students continue the tradition of enjoying themselves and socialising, whatever their nationality and financial status.

Research limitations/implications

The comparison made was not between institutions of equal status. The Institut de Formation Internationale in Rouen is part of a Grande Ecole group which is private, and may attract students from higher income families. The students at Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire study in a rural locale (the towns of Crewe and Alsager in south Cheshire), which is unusual for a UK university and it may well be that a lower proportion of these undergraduates come from higher income families than the French students.

Practical implications

While it would seem to be more equitable and economically efficient for individuals to pay directly for services they receive, rather than those services being funded by higher tax, this study highlights certain problems. The quality of the educational experience for English students may be reduced by their continuing to live at home with parents and carrying out low level work while studying.

Originality/value

No other research appears to have been carried out in the UK or in France on this topic.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of 197