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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Carole Parkes, Judy Scully and Susan Anson

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the conceptual lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), business and civil society can be used to explore “less…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the conceptual lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), business and civil society can be used to explore “less popular causes” (in this case, a community‐based public sector empirical study of initiatives with offenders) and, in particular, respond to the question used by Walzer “In which society can lives be best led?”

Design/methodology/approach

This is a formative and summative evaluation study of a National Offender Management “community payback” offender scheme based in the UK using a mixed method, predominantly qualitative approach that integrates theory and practice.

Findings

The paper finds that citizenship actions of front‐line public sector employees, working in partnership with other agencies in the community, embody the essence of Walzer's notion of CSR and civil society by going beyond the call of duty to provide additional training and moral support for the community offenders.

Originality/value

The paper contributes towards an understanding of how CSR and civil society debates can inform wider aspects of public policy and business through its application to areas of society that are perceived to be “challenging” and “undeserving”.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Susan L. Adkins

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technicalsupport tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of thistechnology published in Computers in

Abstract

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technical support tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of this technology published in Computers in Libraries magazine increases in size and scope. This year, author Susan L. Adkins has prepared this exceptionally useful bibliography which she has cross‐referenced with a subject index.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Loretta S. Wilson and Susan Kwileck

In the wake of numerous late twentieth century cult disasters, and most recently, the September 11 tragedy, this paper considers the question, why do people obey…

Abstract

In the wake of numerous late twentieth century cult disasters, and most recently, the September 11 tragedy, this paper considers the question, why do people obey outrageous commands from charismatic authorities? According to Gary Becker, “the economic ap‐proach provides a valuable unified framework for understanding all human behavior” (Becker 1976:14). We test this generalization by attempting to explain, in terms of rational choice theory, the behavior of two members of infamous cults, the Manson Family and the Ragneesh Foundation International. Each of these subjects slavishly obeyed orders from a charismatic personality, one to the extent of committing murder. Were they mentally ill or rationally maximizing their utility? We consider these theoretical options. In August of 1969 Charles Manson ordered several of his followers to commit gruesome murders for the purpose of initiating the apocalypse. They obeyed. In late 1978, Jim Jones commanded over 900 members of the Peoples Temple to commit suicide. They obeyed. From 1981 to 1985, executing orders to build utopia perceived to come from their guru, members of the Ragneesh Foundation International terrorized the inhabitants of Antelope, Oregon. Similarly, followers of Osama Bin Laden are suspected of carrying out the disastrous suicide murders of September 11. Over past decades, the incidence of violence involving submission to a charismatic leader appears to be escalating. Increasingly the public must contend with the “awesome power” of charisma, “enshrouded in a mystique of irrationality” (Bradley 1987: 3–4). The extent to which followers committing criminal acts of obedience may be held accountable has become a pressing legal issue. How can this kind of volatile religious commitment be explained? In recent years, experts on cults have experimented with rational choice theory. According to economist, Gary Becker, “the economic approach provides a valuable unified framework for understanding all human behavior” (Becker 1976: 14). We test this extravagant claim with two cases of seemingly irrational commitment to a charismatic cult leader—one a follower of Bhagwan Rajneesh, the other a Manson Family killer. These subjects are not representative cult members but rather were chosen because they demonstrated an exceptional loyalty to their leaders that has been widely construed as the result of brainwashing or insanity. Rather than survey data, we rely on autobiographical testimonies since they offer a more detailed and comprehensive view of the thought processes that motivate behavior, the subject matter of this paper.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Catherine Simpson Bueker

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States…

Abstract

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States engaged in varied acts of resistance while students there, both within the classroom and within the larger community. The women accessed the high school through one of the three ways: as town residents, as commuters, or as boarders through two distinct voluntary racial desegregation programs. Through in-depth interviews with 37 women, two overriding trends appear in the data – a form of “resistance for liberation” or “political resistance” in which women push against stereotypes, introduce new programming, and work to reform policies and curriculum, and a smaller strain of “resistance for survival” in which women actively utilize stereotypes. Women with greater amounts of both dominant and nondominant forms of cultural capital are more likely to engage in “political resistance,” while women with lesser amounts of dominant cultural capital show more evidence of “resistance for survival.” Variation exists by point of entry into the system, with town residents showing the lowest levels of either form of resistance.

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1904

LIBRARIANS in charge of small municipal collections are sometimes apt to forget, when enviously regarding some of the larger libraries, that, in many ways, a small library…

Abstract

LIBRARIANS in charge of small municipal collections are sometimes apt to forget, when enviously regarding some of the larger libraries, that, in many ways, a small library has advantages over its larger rivals, and may even carry out ideas and suggestions which are too laborious to be carried out on a very great scale. As an illustration, I wish to cite the experience of my own library at Bingley, and show how, by working out these suggestions, the membership has been raised from 700 to 1,600, and the annual issues from 24,000 to 54,000 volumes.

Details

New Library World, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road…

Abstract

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road, London, upon which the new building for the British Library Reference Division has to be erected. Some twenty years of continued negotiation and discussion finally resulted in the choice of this site. The UK and much more of the world awaits with anticipation what could and should be the major building library of the twentieth century. The planning and design of a library building, however large or small, is, relatively speaking, a major operation, and deserves time, care and patience if the best results are to be produced.

Details

Library Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Norhidayah, Dom, Narimah Kasim and Alina Shamsudin

Human resource planning (HRP) is important during workforce supply to help organizations appoint the right people in the right job. However, few studies have considered…

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource planning (HRP) is important during workforce supply to help organizations appoint the right people in the right job. However, few studies have considered the role of HRP practices for local workforce supply in the Malaysian construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to identify the implementation of HRP and framework development of HRP influencing factors for local workforce supply in the Malaysian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method was adopted to interpret the data of semi‐structured interviews and questionnaire survey. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with ten interviewees from government and non‐government organizations. Questionnaires were distributed to a random selection of contractors in the urban areas of Malaysia. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) and the Matrix Table.

Findings

The findings revealed that economic changes were dominant HRP influencing factors. Only organization strategy; nature of work; economic changes; and demographic (social) changes are significant HRP influencing factors for local workforce supply in the Malaysian construction industry.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should try to adapt the HRP framework in the suitable HRP model to explain the HRP practices in construction organization.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into HRP implementation in construction firms and HRP influencing factors for local workforce supply, focusing on the construction industry in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

Jennifer Guiliano

Although Leutwiler's initiative in taking to the field has been well-documented by scholars and the University of Illinois alike, the role of the UPenn figure, “Benjamin…

Abstract

Although Leutwiler's initiative in taking to the field has been well-documented by scholars and the University of Illinois alike, the role of the UPenn figure, “Benjamin Franklin” or alternately in Illinois narratives “William Penn,” has received little attention (Spindel, 2001; King & Springwood, 2001). Leutwiler's adoption of the “Chief Illiniwek” persona, which will be discussed in-depth later, was not a response to inquiries by the UPenn band who hoped to utilize their articulated personae of “Benjamin Franklin” during a halftime skit as other scholars have suggested. Leutwiler adopted the untitled personae that became the basis for the “Chief” two years earlier during experiences as a Boy Scout and for performances at his alma mater, Urbana High School.6 Although the University of Pennsylvania solicited the Illinois band and assistant director Raymond Dvorak in particular, to create its own figure to interact with “Benjamin Franklin” in a show of “good sportsmanship,” Lester Leutwiler was already performing as an “Indian” before the supposed 1926 inception.7 In fact, his performance was so well known to his classmates at Urbana High School that the yearbook contained multiple references to Leutwiler's penchant for dressing as his Indian persona at school events (Urbana High School, 1925). Importantly, then the UPenn invitation can be read as the opening of a new arena for performances of Indianness – the sports field – not as an inciting event in the creation of “Chief Illiniwek.” Focusing on “Chief Illiniwek” as a sports mascot has eroded the larger cultural context of performances of Indianness that was being undertaken in local and national venues including Urbana High School.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-961-9

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