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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Motoko Akiba

Global focus on reforming teachers has resulted in the inclusion of multiple survey questions about teachers’ professional learning activities in large-scale international…

Abstract

Global focus on reforming teachers has resulted in the inclusion of multiple survey questions about teachers’ professional learning activities in large-scale international studies. A cross-national analysis of these survey data will likely enhance our understanding and inform the future direction regarding teacher professional development policy and practice. Yet we do not know whether these surveys measure the key features and their contextual factors of teachers’ professional learning activities to allow a systematic cross-national analysis. Based on international and U.S. literature, I develop a conceptual model of teachers’ professional learning activities in global context and analyze relevant survey items used in three major international studies – TIMSS, PIRLS, and TALIS. I conclude the chapter with a discussion of the coverage of these survey items and a direction for improving data collections of teachers’ professional learning activities in large-scale international studies.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2014

Shu Guo

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective…

2557

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective professional development programs with various themes and the diversified delivering formats and the assessment of library employees’ training needs and the effectiveness of professional development programs with Needs Assessment Surveys and Program Follow-up Employee Opinion Surveys. Professional development programs are widely adopted in academic libraries to support the professional growth of library employees and improve the quality of library services. Developing, promoting and administering professional development programs are main responsibilities of the PDC.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon the PDC’s recent practices since 2011. The Needs Assessment Surveys (in 2012 and 2013) are conducted electronically, so are the Opinion Surveys since 2013 which are formerly conducted in paper.

Findings

The well-planned professional development program themes with special designed delivery formats have demonstrated their effectiveness through high attendance of each professional development event. The positive results and high compliments from both Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys also endorse their values to employee’s professional growth.

Originality/value

This paper classifies various professional development program ideas into six program themes and three special delivery formats, and each is presented with intention, planning and organization. This paper also provides details of using different Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys for evaluation, which is also lacked in published literature.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Tuomo Alasoini, Asko Heikkilä, Elise Ramstad and Pekka Ylöstalo

This paper seeks to examine the dissemination of high‐involvement innovation practices at Finnish workplaces and to consider how their adoption can be promoted by means of…

1332

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the dissemination of high‐involvement innovation practices at Finnish workplaces and to consider how their adoption can be promoted by means of a publicly‐funded R&D programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical material is based on a survey by the Finnish Workplace Development Programme TYKES. (TYKES is a governmental R&D programme for promoting simultaneous improvements in productivity and the quality of working life by granting funding to development projects at Finnish workplaces.)

Findings

The interim results of the survey provide a strong evidence‐based argument in favour of the supportive role of the programme.

Practical implications

The paper suggests areas where governments might introduce support programmes to foster the spread of innovative activity.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into support policy issues in Finland and will be of interest to those involved in that field.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Andrew Kakabadse

Media coverage of police activities is substantial and makes for “eye‐catching” headlines. Most people in the UK will remember the riots of 1981 and how policemen battled…

Abstract

Media coverage of police activities is substantial and makes for “eye‐catching” headlines. Most people in the UK will remember the riots of 1981 and how policemen battled against overwhelming odds. Equally, the story of the young, brave policeman who attempts, and is injured in the process, to arrest treacherous villains, induces waves of sympathy from a probably, very middle‐class public. Best of all, are the stories of corrupted policemen who, detected and apprehended, generate in us all that slight feeling of insecurity which makes for excellent gossip.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2017

Albert Edgar Manyuchi and John Ouma Mugabe

A growing number of African countries are starting to produce science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. The purpose of this paper is to provide some lessons…

Abstract

Purpose

A growing number of African countries are starting to produce science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. The purpose of this paper is to provide some lessons learnt in the production and use of STI indicators in Malawi and South Africa. It is compares the two countries’ efforts to conduct Research and Development (R&D) surveys and examines whether and how STI indicators are used in policymaking processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study approach is qualitative. The research methodology encompasses a thorough review of both policy and academic literature as well as some interviews.

Findings

The study demonstrates that South Africa has a relatively developed institutional arrangement for undertaking R&D and innovation surveys and developing related STI indicators. There is evidence that efforts are being made to use STI indicators to inform policymaking in the country. On the other hand, Malawi conducted its first R&D survey under the African Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Initiative (ASTII) and has not established an institutional mechanism dedicated to producing STI indicators. There is no evidence that indicators are used in, or to inform, policymaking in the country.

Research limitations/implications

Because of significant differences in STI policymaking histories, capacities and cultures of the two countries, it is not really useful to compare the STI production and use. Rather it is important to draw lessons from the efforts of the two countries.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the production of STI indicators should be embedded in policy processes. To be useful and effective, STI indicators production needs to be explicitly linked to policy formulation, evaluation and monitoring activities without necessarily undermining the independence of producing STI indicators.

Social implications

Creating stand-alone programmes or agencies for R&D and innovation surveys without clear articulation with policymaking needs erodes opportunities of having evidence-based STI policy regimes.

Originality/value

Although in 2005 only South Africa and Tunisia had national programmes dedicated to the generation of R&D statistics, by the end of 2010 at least 19 African countries had experimented with conducting R&D surveys under the auspices of the ASTII of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development. These countries accumulated different experiences and consequently build different kinds of institutional capacities. Through the Malawi and South Africa case studies, some important lessons for STI indicators production and use and STI policymaking can be drawn for developing countries in general and African countries in particular.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Paul G. Fitchett and Phillip J. Vanfossen

In this paper, we outline the rationale for developing the Survey of the Status of Social Studies (S4). The instrument contains items for analyzing the organizational…

1528

Abstract

In this paper, we outline the rationale for developing the Survey of the Status of Social Studies (S4). The instrument contains items for analyzing the organizational structure, instructional decision-making, professional attitudes, and demographics of social studies teachers. Nationally-inclusive data generated from this survey analysis were used to examine the technical and theoretical validity of the instrument. Incorporating factor analysis, findings suggest constructs embedded within S4 related to social studies pedagogy, content emphases, and technology-use that reflect extant theory. As such, the S4 and accompanying nationwide data set offer social educators a valuable resource for fostering professional development and policy.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Thomas A. Musil

Community impacts resulting from corporate facility new development, expansion, renovation, merger, consolidation, closure and disposition activities are under greater…

983

Abstract

Purpose

Community impacts resulting from corporate facility new development, expansion, renovation, merger, consolidation, closure and disposition activities are under greater scrutiny by public officials, citizen, and special interest groups. The paper reports public sector views on municipal structure, most desired industries, community advantages, use of cost benefit studies and the methods used to evaluate development impacts.

Design/methodology/approach

The research presented is based on a national survey of US economic development officials and their methods for measuring project impacts and determining public costs and benefits associated with economic development projects.

Findings

The research found that the public sector emphasized community advantages that were abstract and hard to measure in response to the corporate need for hard data on facility and development costs. About 30 percent of the public administrators surveyed never or rarely used any measures to determine community impacts associated with facility development. The most common impact measures used were individual experience, public meetings, tax impacts, amount of private investment, and local planning goals. Infrastructure costs, environmental quality issues, traffic and public services were the most important cost areas.

Research limitations/implications

Every corporate real estate project has unique characteristics and accordingly, community impacts vary. This research presents an overview of the analysis methods used or not used by public development officials. The corporate decision maker must learn to recognize needs and opportunities for additional data collection that will make a case for facility project support.

Practical implications

Understanding the public sector impact analysis perspective is important because it enables corporate real estate decision makers to understand key issues, frame and present projects to citizens, identify research gaps and negotiate greater subsidies, and fair terms in development and performance agreements.

Originality/value

Surprisingly, very little research exists in this area. The survey data indicate limited use of impact measures and methods. Future research into this area should investigate why impact analysis measures are not extensively used and how standard measures could be used to evaluate social, environmental and economic impacts.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2007

Laurie McLeod, Stephen MacDonell and Bill Doolin

The purpose of this research is to obtain an updated assessment of the use of standard methods in IS development practice in New Zealand, and to compare these practices to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to obtain an updated assessment of the use of standard methods in IS development practice in New Zealand, and to compare these practices to those reported elsewhere.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based survey of IS development practices in New Zealand organisations with 200 or more full‐time employees was conducted. The results of the survey were compared to prior studies from other national contexts.

Findings

The results suggest that levels of standard method use continue to be high in New Zealand organisations, although methods are often used in a pragmatic or ad hoc way. Further, the type of method used maps to a shift from bespoke development to system acquisition or outsourcing. Organisations that reported using standard methods perceived them to be beneficial to IS development in their recent IS projects, and generally disagreed with most of the published limitations of standard methods.

Research limitations/implications

As the intent was to consider only New Zealand organisations, the results of the survey cannot be generalised further afield. More comparative research is needed to establish whether the trends identified here occur at a wider regional or international level.

Practical implications

A significant proportion of organisations anticipated extending their use of standard methods. Growth in packaged software acquisition and outsourced development suggests an increasing need for deployment management as well as development management, possibly reflecting the increased visibility of standard project management methods.

Originality/value

The relevance of traditional standard methods of IS development has been questioned in a changing and more dynamic IS development environment. This study provides an updated assessment of standard method use in New Zealand organisations that will be of interest to researchers and practitioners monitoring IS development and acquisition elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Chenicheri Sid Nair, David Pawley and Patricie Mertova

This paper aims to report on how an Administrative Division at a research‐intensive Australian university utilised feedback data from the Learning and Growth Survey, to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on how an Administrative Division at a research‐intensive Australian university utilised feedback data from the Learning and Growth Survey, to initiate changes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper refers to the actions taken by the Administrative Division to the results obtained from the Learning and Growth Survey. The questionnaire items are based on the “Balanced Scorecard” system outlined by Kaplan and Norton in 1996. It consists of a number of items identified as integral to effective growth and learning strategies for staff‐development. The questionnaire seeks staff perceptions of the individual items and how their needs are met in the current University management practices.

Findings

The results of this survey indicate that employees were willing to provide practical feedback on a range of dimensions, which they felt would assist improvement of their development and growth opportunities. Further, this paper demonstrates that in any exercise which involves collecting information on staff perceptions, staff not only expect that the data would be utilized constructively, but also that the institution would also make practical changes based on their feedback and that they would be informed about these changes.

Practical implications

This survey revealed that some of the feedback obtained from participants had limitations as to what actions could be taken within the Administrative Division because of the ramifications for institutional budgets. However, issues related to improvement of the learning and growth environment were possible to address through practical changes within the bounds of the Division's budget. Further, when conducting similar surveys among university staff, it is essential that anonymity of the participants is ensured. It is also vital that the purposes, outcomes, proposed actions and progress in implementation of these actions are well communicated to all the staff.

Originality/value

A growing number of tertiary institutions have recently started conducting surveys among their staff concerning the staff satisfaction with their work in the organisation(s). Despite this growing number of employee surveys, there is a lack of academic literature available describing how such surveys are conducted and the issues that institutions face when designing, implementing and evaluating these surveys. From the available information, it was also unclear what aspects of employee experience these surveys cover and whether they focus on staff learning and development. Therefore, this paper attempts to make a step in that direction by describing an employee survey regularly conducted among staff within administrative units at a large Australian University.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Rebecca Lowenhaupt and Todd D. Reeves

Changing immigration patterns in the USA have led to a growing number of “new immigrant destinations.” In these contexts, opportunities for teacher learning are crucial…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing immigration patterns in the USA have led to a growing number of “new immigrant destinations.” In these contexts, opportunities for teacher learning are crucial for developing the school capacity to serve the academic, linguistic and socio-cultural needs of immigrant students. In response, the purpose of this paper is to examine how schools in Wisconsin provided both formal and informal teacher learning opportunities to develop the instructional capacity to support recent immigrants, specifically Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using descriptive analyses of teacher and administrator survey and interview data, this study examined the focus and within-school distribution of formal professional development, as well as teacher collaboration as a mechanism for informal learning.

Findings

Most commonly, professional development focused on concrete strategies teachers might enact in their classrooms, rather than developing broader understandings of the needs of immigrant students. In addition, formal professional development commonly targeted particular groups of teachers, rather than faculty as a whole. Finally, general education-ELL teacher collaboration was most often deployed “as needed” and focused on particular student needs, rather than systematically.

Research limitations/implications

Future work might address the limitations of this study by examining teacher learning opportunities in new immigrant destinations in other locales, the quality and effectiveness of such opportunities, and other mechanisms for the distribution of expertise.

Originality/value

Findings suggest the need for more systematic and integrated approaches to teacher learning in new immigrant destinations, with an emphasis on pushing beyond the short-term need for instructional strategies to develop more holistic, collaborative approaches to integrating ELLs into schools and classrooms.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

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