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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Anyuan Shen and Surinder Tikoo

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of firm size on this relationship. Toward this end, the study seeks to develop a theoretical explanation for how consumers process family business identity information.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative pre-study was conducted to obtain preliminary evidence that consumers’ perceptions of family businesses originate from both family- and business-based category beliefs. A product evaluation experiment, involving young adult subjects, was used to test the research hypotheses, and the experiment data were analyzed using MANOVA.

Findings

The key finding was that the effect of family business identity disclosure on consumer product evaluations is moderated by firm size.

Practical implications

This research has implications for businesses seeking to promote their family business identity in branding communications.

Originality/value

This research provides a theoretical account of why consumers might hold different perceptions of family business brands. The interactive effect of firm size and family business identity information disclosure on consumer product evaluations contributes new insight to family business branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Surinder Tikoo

This study aims to examine the relationship between a franchisor's use of different types of persuasive communication to influence its franchisees and franchisee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between a franchisor's use of different types of persuasive communication to influence its franchisees and franchisee perceptions of conflict in the franchise relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regression analysis of survey data collected from franchisees of a US‐based franchise system.

Findings

Data analysis indicates that a franchisor's use of requests, threats, and legalistic pleas is positively related to conflict in the franchisor‐franchisee relationship. These relationships are not moderated by franchisee dependence. Franchisee dependence, does however, negatively moderate the relationship between the franchisor's use of recommendations and conflict. The franchisor's use of information exchange and promises and conflict are not related. The results suggest that business format franchisors should use information exchange and promises and restrain from using requests, threats, and legalistic pleas to influence their franchisees. Recommendations should be used to influence franchisees who are highly dependent on the franchisor.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should validate the findings of this study using data collected from business format franchisees in different cultural environments.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to examine the relationship between a franchisor's use of different types of persuasive communication and conflict in the business format franchise setting.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jae‐Young Kim, Junyean Moon, Dongchul Han and Surinder Tikoo

This study examines the relationships among distributive justice, procedural justice, and employee willingness to engage in customer‐oriented behavior. Data collected from…

Abstract

This study examines the relationships among distributive justice, procedural justice, and employee willingness to engage in customer‐oriented behavior. Data collected from 328 employees at eight general hospitals in Korea show that distributive justice does and procedural justice does not directly affect employee willingness to engage in customer‐oriented behavior. Procedural justice does, however, positively affect perceptions of distributive justice.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kristin Backhaus and Surinder Tikoo

Employer branding represents a firm's efforts to promote, both within and outside the firm, a clear view of what makes it different and desirable as an employer. In recent…

Abstract

Employer branding represents a firm's efforts to promote, both within and outside the firm, a clear view of what makes it different and desirable as an employer. In recent years employer branding has gained popularity among practicing managers. Given this managerial interest, this article presents a framework to initiate the scholarly study of employer branding. Combining a resource‐based view with brand equity theory, a framework is used to develop testable propositions. The article discusses the relationship between employer branding and organizational career management. Finally, it outlines research issues that need to be addressed to develop employer branding as a useful organizing framework for strategic human resource management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Lena Lindholm

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become an essential part of business, and companies should genuinely incorporate social responsibilities toward internal and…

Abstract

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become an essential part of business, and companies should genuinely incorporate social responsibilities toward internal and external stakeholders in their operations. The most important stakeholder group is the personnel, which is why employers should pay attention to strengthening the employer–employee relationship. The purpose of this text is to demonstrate the connections between employer branding and CSR.

Theory on employer branding and CSR indicates that there are both strategic and operational connections. Strategically, employer branding can be considered the outcome of the co-operation among branding, CSR, and human resource management (HRM). At an operational level, there are several CSR activities that can be of use when developing and implementing economic, functional, and psychological employer-branding elements.

In order to establish how CSR is used in employer branding in practice, a qualitative content analysis of the website communication of three multinational IT companies was made. All of the companies have been acknowledged for their strong internal employer brands, and the analysis focused on what types of CSR activities they communicate externally as part of their employer branding efforts.

The study concludes that CSR can be relevant to employer branding and presents a categorization model for facilitating a concrete integration of CSR and employer-branding elements.

Details

Developing Insights on Branding in the B2B Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-276-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Chi-Cheng Lee, Rui-Hsin Kao and Chia-Jung Lin

This paper aims to develop the structure of employer brand and discuss whether employees and employers have the same view on the elements of employer brand.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop the structure of employer brand and discuss whether employees and employers have the same view on the elements of employer brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The employer brand of Taiwan, which includes 5 facets and 20 eight terms, was obtained. Management, welfare, interest and environment are the common facets of employer brand in China and Western countries. In addition, family and atmosphere is an important factor that merges both Western and Eastern job applicants. Its contents emphasize family life, which is only found in applicants from Taiwan and China.

Findings

The results showed that enterprises utilize functional factors in order to connect emotions closely and satisfy psychological sustenance, which have true attraction to young Taiwanese applicants and the current workforce of employees.

Originality/value

In general, after 20 years of establishment and empirical research, the achievements are rich and many practical opinions are provided. However, most of the existing literatures come from the researches of Western scholars, and they may be affected by the Western social value. This study has explored the Oriental and Western literatures. In the study field of Taiwan, it is found that employer brand will definitely show different style features due to the cultural difference. Therefore, when an enterprise applies the relevant connotation of the employer brand, it is necessary considering the cultural difference. This shows the importance of cross-cultural study of employer brand recently. At the same time, this also highlights the contribution of this study on theory and practice.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Asuman Matongolo, Francis Kasekende and Sam Mafabi

The purpose of this paper is to examine, empirically the relationship between employer branding attributes of reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine, empirically the relationship between employer branding attributes of reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and development on talent retention in institutions of higher learning in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained form 218 respondents from two public universities. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling were employed to analyze the data.

Findings

The paper has two major findings: first, CFA maintained three dimensions of employer branding, namely; reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and development; and second, only reward strategy and people orientedness emerged as significant predictors of talent retention.

Originality/value

The results suggest that institutions of higher learning that embrace reward people orientedness strategies as measures for employer branding succeed in retaining their employees for longer.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Scott Weaven, Lorelle Frazer and Jeff Giddings

Although Australian franchising sector regulation promotes system disclosure and provides for mandatory conflict mediation, there is some concern that inequities exist…

Abstract

Purpose

Although Australian franchising sector regulation promotes system disclosure and provides for mandatory conflict mediation, there is some concern that inequities exist within the conflict management process. From 2006 to 2008 no less than four government inquiries into franchising took place in Australia in an attempt to resolve problems occurring in the sector. A major issue was that of the perceived imbalance of power in the franchisor‐franchisee relationship, which often results in conflict between the two parties. The purpose of this paper is to extend the conflict literature in dyadic exchange relationships through investigating the causes of conflict from the franchisor and franchisee perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory research is undertaken to identify the major causes of franchising conflict. Face‐to‐face interviews are conducted with 24 franchising experts, such as lawyers and mediators, to draw upon their considerable experience in the sector.

Findings

The key findings suggest that a lack of due diligence is associated with the formation of unrealistic expectations which increases the potential for future relational conflict. Although franchising experience impacts upon operational approaches and conflict, the role played by third parties and market conditions both appear to exacerbate dissatisfaction in franchise systems.

Research limitations/implications

This research is exploratory and therefore the findings are tentative. The preliminary conceptual models will be tested in a large quantitative survey of key franchising stakeholders in the near future.

Originality/value

With the Australian franchising sector presently under intense scrutiny by regulators this research is timely and important. It is expected that the findings will provide government and industry representatives with a more balanced understanding of the causes of franchising conflict so that preventative action may be taken.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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