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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Suresh Malodia and Harish Singla

This paper aims to measure the satisfaction of religious tourists travelling to various destinations in the Himalayas to identify the expectation-experience gaps and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure the satisfaction of religious tourists travelling to various destinations in the Himalayas to identify the expectation-experience gaps and understand the shift in motives of travel.

Design/methodology/approach

The satisfaction of religious tourists is examined using holiday satisfaction (HOLSAT) model developed by Tribe and Snaith (1998). The study analyzes the expectation-experience gap using mean scores on 47 destination specific attributes for a sample of 500 respondents.

Findings

The study finds a significant gap between the expectations and experience of religious tourists traveling to sacred destinations in the Himalayas. The study also finds that motives of religious tourists have shifted from purely religious to secular touristic motives.

Practical implications

The results of the study reinforce the value of HOLSAT model as a potential tool to measure and enhance the satisfaction of religious tourists, indicating the attributes that can contribute positively toward tourist satisfaction.

Originality/value

Measuring the expectations and experience for the same set of respondents is a unique contribution of this study. The study attempts to overcome limitations of the HOLSAT model as discussed by Tribe and Snaith.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 31 March 2018

Anand Kumar Jaiswal and Suresh Malodia

It was mid-March 2014, and GE's John F. Welch Technology Centre in Bangalore, India was brimming with activity. GE had developed an advanced, scalable positron emission…

Abstract

It was mid-March 2014, and GE's John F. Welch Technology Centre in Bangalore, India was brimming with activity. GE had developed an advanced, scalable positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner as part of its global Healthymagination initiative to provide better healthcare for more people at a lower cost. Munesh Makhija, Managing Director, GE India Technology Centre and Chief Technology Officer (CTO), GE South Asia, was thumbing through a report prepared by the PET/CT product development team and GE's healthcare market research team. In another office, Suresh Kumar R.(Kumar), General Manager of the Essential PET Segment, was putting the finishing touches on a presentation outlining a commercialisation strategy for the new PET/CT product, Discovery IQ (Exhibit 1).

Discovery IQ was a revolutionary product that would be useful for staging, treatment planning and post-treatment planning assessment. Early reviews from nuclear physicians had been positive. However, the product was still too costly for the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) market. Kumar and his team were scheduled to meet with Makhija the following morning to discuss a “go-to-market strategy”. Kumar knew that Makhija would want to talk about their segmentation strategy and the underlying needs of various customer types. He also expected Makhija to focus on return on investment (ROI) projections because diagnostic centres in India first looked at various financial return measures before investing in any new equipment. Kumar wanted to present a commercialisation strategy for Discovery IQ, which required a significant commitment of resources to tackle supply and distribution challenges across tier II and tier III citiesa in India.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Case study
Publication date: 7 January 2015

Suresh Malodia and Anand Kumar Jaiswal

GE Healthcare was on a continuous lookout for investing into new and innovative super value products for the Bottom of the Pyramid markets in India. After launching its…

Abstract

GE Healthcare was on a continuous lookout for investing into new and innovative super value products for the Bottom of the Pyramid markets in India. After launching its first successful super value ECG machine Mac 400, GE had recently launched its twenty-fifth super value product a PET CT machine. Serving the BOP markets has its own unique challenges that may be different for each product that is placed in the market. However, GE has so far successfully sailed through all the challenges and developed a steep learning curve about BOP markets. However, it is now facing the challenge of ensuring sustainability of product pipeline. The company is also keen to exploit the opportunities for reverse innovation that super value products have provided. The company also wants to assess the disruptive impact of these products in domestic medical device markets as well as markets outside India.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Kishore Thomas John and Ajith Kumar Kamala Raghavan

Participants will learn to analyze the basis of consumer segmentation in management education. It will specifically highlight the importance of positioning in influencing…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Participants will learn to analyze the basis of consumer segmentation in management education. It will specifically highlight the importance of positioning in influencing the marketing strategy of a firm and discuss the importance of a differentiated-low cost strategy to gain competitive advantage. The case will familiarize students with the business environment of rural India, and the applicability of the 4A’s and the 5D’s framework. Finally, the case will help participants understand the difference between a rural market and a Bottom-of-Pyramid (BoP) market.

Case overview/synopsis

A rural MBA institute for BoP students is grappling with the problem of low admissions, leading to an existential crisis. Two divergent options are presented to the protagonist. The first is to close down the B-school and use the infrastructure and facilities for a well-funded government skill development program which is vocational and intended for creating blue-collar workers. The second is to find ways to bolster the B-school to ensure that it gets adequate student enrollment, thereby leading to profitability.

Complexity academic level

This case is suitable for an undergraduate or MBA course in marketing management, rural marketing in India, South-Asian marketing or strategic marketing.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or e-mail support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. There is an accompanying spreadsheet with the case for studying the market. It contains relevant market data that would support analysis of the case. Comments are added for easy understanding. Instructors can access the separate spreadsheet that works out the break-even calculations for the fee structure of the institute. Instructions on calculations as well as comments are added for easy understanding.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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