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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Sanjay Mishra, Surendra N. Singh, Xiang Fang and Bingqing Yin

Co-branding is popular with partnerships between well-known and new brands. In a laboratory study, this paper aims to examine the effects of a single ally and multiple…

Abstract

Purpose

Co-branding is popular with partnerships between well-known and new brands. In a laboratory study, this paper aims to examine the effects of a single ally and multiple allies on quality perception of a brand. The results suggest that the quality perception of the new brand depends on the co-branding strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

For dual-brand alliances, a single-factor design was used, with secondary brand quality level (high, medium and low) as the independent variable. Three advertisements were created by manipulating quality levels of the single partner. For multiple-brand alliances, a 2 × 3 between-subjects factorial design was used in the experiment. The two factors were diversification (homogeneous vs heterogeneous) and quality levels of the alliance (high-end, mixed and low-end).

Findings

The results suggest that the number of brand partners significantly affected the perceived quality of the primary brand. For both dual- and multi-brand alliances, the quality level of the secondary brand positively influenced the perceived quality of the primary brand. For multiple-brand alliances, even though the highest quality perceptions of the primary brand are in the heterogeneous conditions, the heterogeneity of partners (partners across different product categories) did not affect the quality perception of the primary brand.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the current study is that it only addresses one type of brand alliance: co-promotion. The generalization of these findings to other forms of brand alliances (e.g. ingredient branding: Intel with IBM, Dell and HP) merits further investigation. Also, in this study, respondents processed the information in a relatively low-involvement condition (note that the target ad was presented along with filler ads). They were more likely to use brand names as heuristic cues to form their judgments. Because an alliance partner also assumes risks, future research should consider the effect of the alliances on the secondary brand.

Practical implications

Understanding brand alliances (especially multiple-brand alliances) is critical for new product managers and marketers. Introducing a new brand has higher risk and failure rates. Companies may lower these risks by co-branding with established brands. However, they should carefully consider the diversification and quality level of the partners. If brand managers position their product as “high quality (luxury)” or “low quality (budget)”, they should choose high- (or low-) quality partners from different product categories (heterogeneous high-end or low-end alliances) because diversification strengthens the primary brand. For a single-partner alliance, the secondary brand should be of high quality.

Originality/value

This paper extends the brand alliance literature beyond single-partner to multiple-partner alliances. With multiple partners, one can explore several critical aspects of an alliance, e.g. quality variance and product class diversity across the partners.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

D. Todd Donavan, Xiang Fang, Neeli Bendapudi and Surendra N. Singh

Modern interactionism asserts that both the P (person) and the E (environment or situation) should be considered simultaneously in predicting attitudes and behaviors. In…

Abstract

Modern interactionism asserts that both the P (person) and the E (environment or situation) should be considered simultaneously in predicting attitudes and behaviors. In this paper, we apply the interactionist view to salesforce research. Specifically, we use salesforce socialization as an example to illustrate how interactionist concepts from psychology can be effectively applied in salesforce research. The role of qualitative research in this context is explored.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Mohammed Ismail El‐Adly

The main objective of this study is to identify the determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy avoiders in greater Cairo. To achieve the study…

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to identify the determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy avoiders in greater Cairo. To achieve the study objective, five hypotheses have been developed and tested by such statistical techniques as discriminant analysis, t‐tests, MannWhitney tests, and Chi Square tests. A questionnaire has been designed to collect data from a systematic random sample of adults in social clubs and shopping centers in greater Cairo. The number of usable questionnaires in data analysis was 364. The study findings show that all respondents except 3 were doing one or more of TV ads avoiding behavior. Cognitive avoiding represents the most frequently used avoiding behavior by light and heavy TV ads avoiders. The results also demonstrate that perceptions, attitudes toward advertising, and some motives were determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior. On the other hand, it was found that all demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, except types of channels, were not determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy TV ads avoiders. The study concludes with a number of academic and practical recommendations.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Surendra Singh Rajpurohit and Rajesh Sharma

This paper not only aims to validate the environment Kuznets curve concerning five Asian economies but also attempts to analyze the impact of some additional factors like…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper not only aims to validate the environment Kuznets curve concerning five Asian economies but also attempts to analyze the impact of some additional factors like financial development, energy consumption and foreign direct investment (FDI) on carbon emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies pooled mean group approach on the variables of a panel of five Asian economies namely India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Malaysia for a period of 35 years from 1980 to 2014.

Findings

This study finds that while moderate economic growth as well as moderate financial development increase carbon emissions, accelerated or exponential economic growth as well as exponential financial development eventually reduce the level of carbon emissions. Energy consumption was found to have a direct and significant relationship with carbon emissions. FDI inflows when analyzed on a stand-alone basis were observed to have an inverse relationship with carbon emissions, while FDI inflows when clubbed with financial development were observed to have a direct relationship with carbon emissions.

Practical implications

The findings of this study, which validate the environmental Kuznets curve, suggest striving for higher economic growth, even if it causes increased carbon emissions to begin with, as the effects on carbon emissions would eventually get reversed when the economic growth accelerates at a higher rate. This study also suggests the appropriate routing of FDI through a mature and developed financial sector to leverage its impact on the environment in a positive way.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge of the authors of this paper, there has not been any research carried out so far, which has analyzed the impact of the combination of variables selected for this study concerning the five Asian economies covered in this paper.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Rohit Kumar Singh, Surendra Kansara and Niraj Kumar Vishwakarma

The aim of this paper is to identify the criteria that are used for vendor or supplier rating, prioritize these criteria based on the industry inputs and develop a vendor…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify the criteria that are used for vendor or supplier rating, prioritize these criteria based on the industry inputs and develop a vendor rating model. The data were collected from an Indian start-up working in product development using three-dimensional printing (3DP).

Design/methodology/approach

Factors of importance for vendor rating were identified through industry visits, and interacting with the industry experts from the start-up under consideration, substantiated by extensive review of relevant literature. A questionnaire-based survey was carried out to further narrow down the factors important to the industry, prioritizing them with a pairwise comparison analysis as envisaged in the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) technique along with the calculation of consistency ratios. Technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) methodology was further used for data aggregation.

Findings

This research brought forward the criteria that are useful for rating vendors or suppliers with reference to 3DP sector.

Originality/value

This paper integrates AHP and TOPSIS to solve a multi-criteria vendor rating problem. The attempt was made to make vendor rating process universal so that it can encompass all the vendors of the firm.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Rakesh Raut, Vaibhav Narwane, Sachin Kumar Mangla, Vinay Surendra Yadav, Balkrishna Eknath Narkhede and Sunil Luthra

This study initially aims to identify the barriers to the big data analytics (BDA) initiative and further evaluates the barriers for knowing their interrelations and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study initially aims to identify the barriers to the big data analytics (BDA) initiative and further evaluates the barriers for knowing their interrelations and priority in improving the performance of manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 15 barriers to BDA adoption were identified through literature review and expert opinions. Data were collected from three types of industries: automotive, machine tools and electronics manufacturers in India. The grey-decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method was employed to explore the cause–effect relationship amongst barriers. Further, the barrier's influences were outranked and cross-validated through analytic network process (ANP).

Findings

The results showed that “lack of data storage facility”, “lack of IT infrastructure”, “lack of organisational strategy” and “uncertain about benefits and long terms usage” were most common barriers to adopt BDA practices in all three industries.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can assist service providers, industrial managers and government organisations in understanding the barriers and subsequently evaluating interrelationships and ranks of barriers in the successful adoption of BDA in a manufacturing organisation context.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the initial efforts in evaluating the barriers to BDA in improving the performance of manufacturing firms in India.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 January 2012

Nilamadhab Kar, Surendra P. Singh, Tongeji E. Tungaraza, Susmit Roy, Maxine O'Brien, Debbie Cooper and Shishir Regmi

In many UK mental health services, in-patient psychiatric care is being separated from community care by having dedicated in-patient medical team. We evaluated staff…

Abstract

In many UK mental health services, in-patient psychiatric care is being separated from community care by having dedicated in-patient medical team. We evaluated staff satisfaction in this functionalised in-patient care. A survey was conducted amongst multidiscipli-nary staff from various teams using a questionnaire survey. On an average 14.3% of staff returned a satisfactory response for function-alisation, 57.3% had unsatisfactory response and others were undecided or perceived no change. There was no difference in responses amongst age, gender and professional groups. Mean scores of all groups were within unsatisfactory domain; however community staff compared to in-patient staff and staff with more than 5 years of experience compared to those with 1-5 years of experience returned significantly more unsatisfactory responses regarding functionalisation. Many positive and negative aspects of functionalisation were raised. The results of this evaluation suggest the need for further studies on the effectiveness of in-patient functionalisation. Short and long term clinical outcomes and the satisfaction of the patients should also be studied.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Surendra Kumar Sia and Pravakar Duari

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of agentic work behaviour and decision-making authority (DMA) to thriving at work and, more importantly, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of agentic work behaviour and decision-making authority (DMA) to thriving at work and, more importantly, the moderating role of DMA in the relationship between agentic behaviour and thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has been carried out upon a random sample of 330 employees below supervisory level from manufacturing companies located at Odisha (a state located at the eastern part of India). After verifying the significance of correlation among the study variables through Pearson’s product moment correlation, moderated regression analyses were carried out to examine the independent contribution of agentic work behaviour and DMA to thriving as well as the moderating contribution of DMA towards thriving.

Findings

Results reveal that the three dimensions of agentic work behaviour, namely, task focus, exploration and heedful relation, have a direct positive contribution towards thriving at workplace. As far as the moderation is concerned, it is observed that the thriving level is higher for the employees having high DMA irrespective of the level of agentic work behaviour at each dimension.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply for designing interventions to enhance task focus, super-ordinate relationship and interest for learning. In addition, the organisations should provide autonomy to employees for decision making.

Originality/value

The study is first of its kind in the Indian context upon employee thriving. In this study, the authors have not only investigated the separate independent contribution of agentic behaviour and DMA, but also their interacting contribution to employee thriving.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Surendra Kumar Sia and Alphonsa Jose

The purpose of this paper is to combine the theory of planned behavior variables with norm activation model to predict the behavioral intention to build eco-friendly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine the theory of planned behavior variables with norm activation model to predict the behavioral intention to build eco-friendly houses among adult house owners of Kerala. It was hypothesized that the moral obligation will mediate the relationship of both attitude and subjective norm toward the intention to build eco-friendly houses.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 269 adult house owners from Kerala with the help of structured questionnaires. Attitude toward eco-friendly houses was measured using semantic differential scale, subjective norm was measured using items adapted from Ajzen and Jansson and Dorrepaal, personal norm was measured using 7 items adapted from Jansson and Dorrepaal and behavioral intention to build eco-friendly house was measured using 14-item measures which probed the various characteristics of eco-friendly buildings. Data were analyzed using mediation analysis with the help of PROCESS macro plug-in of IBM SPSS.

Findings

The study revealed that the relationship between subjective norm and behavioral intention to construct eco-friendly houses was fully mediated by personal norm, and the relationship between attitude and behavioral intention was partially mediated by personal norm.

Research limitations/implications

Eco-friendly houses or sustainable architecture is the requirement of the time. Psychology can play a major role in increasing the choice to opt an eco-friendly alternative. The present study tries to develop a green marketing strategy by understanding the influential psychological variables. The study points to the importance of personal moral obligation of the people in the choice of the eco-friendly houses. The study is limited in itself because it failed to consider any situational factors that may be influential in the intention to build an eco-friendly house.

Originality/value

Considering the immediacy and potency of global climate change and the role green architecture can play to reduce the impact of the blow, eco-friendly architecture is inevitable. Many psychological studies have been instrumental in shaping and changing individual behaviors. Considering these facts the present study aims to identify the role of psychological variables in determining the intention to build eco-friendly houses. This study will help in identifying the relevant personal variables that can promote eco-friendly construction.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Harshita Harshita, Shveta Singh and Surendra S. Yadav

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the monthly seasonality in the Indian stock market after taking into consideration the market features of leptokurtosis…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the monthly seasonality in the Indian stock market after taking into consideration the market features of leptokurtosis, volatility clustering and the leverage effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Augmented Dickey-Fuller, Phillips-Perron and Kwaitkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin tests are deployed to check stationarity of the series. Autocorrelation function, partial autocorrelation function and Ljung-Box statistics are employed to check the applicability of volatility models. An exponential generalized auto regressive conditionally heteroskedastic model is deployed to test the seasonality, where the conditional mean equation is a switching model with dummy variables for each month of the year.

Findings

Though the financial year in India stretches from April to March, the stock market exhibits a November effect (returns in November are the highest). Cultural factors, misattribution bias and liquidity hypothesis seem to explain the phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

The paper endeavors to provide a review of possible explanations behind month-of-the-year effect documented in literature in the past four decades. Further, the unique evidence from the Indian stock market supports the argument in the literature that monthly seasonality, by nature, may not be a consistent/robust phenomenon. Therefore, it needs to be examined from time to time.

Originality/value

As the seasonality in the stock market and resultant anomalies are dynamic phenomena, the paper reports the current seasonality/anomalies prevalent in the Indian market. This would aid investors in designing short-term investment portfolios (based on anomalies present) in order to earn abnormal returns.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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