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Case study
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

To understand social entrepreneurship and a social entrepreneur; to identify a social problem and develop a business idea; to understand the theory of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

To understand social entrepreneurship and a social entrepreneur; to identify a social problem and develop a business idea; to understand the theory of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition; and to understand microfinance and its impact in the lives of the poor.

Case overview/synopsis

The case traces the journey of its founder Chandra Shekhar Ghosh from being a small time entrepreneur in microfinance to being the owner of a universal bank named Bandhan. Bandhan bank started its operations on August 23, 2015 with 501 branches, 2022 service center and 50 ATMs across 24 states. It had 14.3 million accounts, around 105 billion loan book and 19,500 employees. The founder of Bandhan bank, Chandra Shekhar Ghosh, an Ashoka fellow had won numerous awards such as Entrepreneur with Social Impact Award by Forbes (2014), Entrepreneur of the Year by Economic Times (2014), Skoch Financial Inclusion Award (2011), Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2014) by AIMA to name a few. In 2014, Bandhan was also recognized as Global Growth Company by World Economic Forum.

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for analysis in a MBA level course on social entrepreneurship.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to understand a business model canvas.

Case overview/synopsis

Baromeeter (BOM), was a Delhi-based startup founded in the year 2016 by Rishabh Vyas, a 26-year-old MBA graduate. Currently, BOM has operations in Delhi-NCR with 50,000 monthly website visitors and 200-plus partner restaurants and cafes in Delhi-NCR with brands such as Imperfecto, Junkyard Café, Garam Dharam, Out of the Box, Boombox, Jungle Jamboree and many more. BOM also receives over 1,000 deal bookings and 200 plus party bookings monthly. Going forward, Rishabh has plans to expand to other cities such as Mumbai, Hyderabad, Pune and Bangalore. However, there are certain challenges. So far, the startup has raised funds from friends and families. He was confident that he had a compelling product. However, he knew he had to look for fresh investments to scale up. The existing funds may sustain the operations of the company for another six months. Rishabh was considering a number of options. However, whom to approach? Would banks be interested in lending money? How about participating in angel investor’s meet?

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for a course in graduate and an undergraduate course in entrepreneurship. The case can be used to understand the business model canvas and to understand the funding options available for startups.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Santanu Mandal, Rathin Sarathy, Venkateshwar Rao Korasiga, Sourabh Bhattacharya and Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inter-relationship among dominant supply chain capabilities of collaboration, flexibility, velocity and visibility and how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inter-relationship among dominant supply chain capabilities of collaboration, flexibility, velocity and visibility and how the same influence supply chain resilience (SCRES) and supply chain performance. Further, the aim is to explore the relationship between integrated logistics capabilities and supply chain capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested with survey data collected from 339 supply chain professionals. The collected data were then analyzed with confirmatory factor analysis, and the proposed relationships were tested with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Integrated logistics capabilities were found to positively influence supply chain collaboration and supply chain visibility. There is a positive influence of each of collaboration, flexibility, visibility and velocity on SCRES. Further, each of these supply chain capabilities positively influences each other to a greater extent. Further, SCRES was found to have a positive influence on supply chain performance.

Research limitations/implications

Like many other cross sectional studies, this study also suffers from data collected from single respondent per firm.

Originality/value

The study is significant and holds immense importance for managers and supply chain practitioners because it has suggested them to focus on core supply chain capabilities, for example, collaboration, flexibility, visibility and visibility for developing SCRES. Along with this, it undersigned the growing importance and empirical influence of integrated logistics capabilities in developing these supply chain capabilities and also the positive influence of resilience on supply chain performance.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 19 November 2013

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar and Srividya Raghavan

Marketing, strategy, and integrated marketing communication.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, strategy, and integrated marketing communication.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for analysis in an MBA level marketing communication course where the theories of hierarchy of effects (HoE) models, push vs pull strategies as well as positioning strategies can be introduced. The case is suitable for analysis in an MBA level marketing course for the module on marketing communications/advertising and promotions.

Case overview

Sanjay, the regional head of PepsiCo India (eastern region), had been tasked with the preparation of a support plan for a new communication campaign of Mountain Dew, a yellow-coloured drink in PepsiCo's soft-drink portfolio. He had attended a meeting at the headquarters where he had been briefed on the new national campaign roll-out for Mountain Dew – for the first time with celebrity association. While Mountain Dew had been growing its market share in other regions of the Indian market, the Eastern region had been unresponsive to the mass media image building campaigns. During the meeting, the various aspects of Mountain Dew's performance were discussed and Sanjay was asked to prepare a support plan for the national campaign that will help to increase revenues and market share of the brand in the Eastern region.

Expected learning outcomes

To understand the complexities of differential impact of integrated nation-wide communications on various segments of the market due to cultural variations, to understand the role of push strategy vs pull strategy in marketing communications, to understand the role of consistency in image between the trade and consumers perception, to understand the impact of celebrity endorsements, an introduction to the HoE communication models and their applications, to understand limitations of the HoE and Think-Feel-Do models in objective setting and understanding the uses of alternative models, to build a communication plan based on pull vs push strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Case study
Publication date: 22 June 2015

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar and Rahul Thakurta

The case can be introduced in the information technology (IT) strategy course. The case can also fit well in courses like emergent technologies where the case forms the…

Abstract

Subject area

The case can be introduced in the information technology (IT) strategy course. The case can also fit well in courses like emergent technologies where the case forms the vehicle to show how cloud-based solutions can provide leverage to an organization.

Study level/applicability

The case is aligned more for management participants, for example, students who are enrolled in master's or executive program in management. Considering the master's program in management, the case can be introduced in the IT strategy course. The case can also fit well in courses like emergent technologies where the case forms the vehicle to show how cloud-based solutions can provide leverage to an organization. Assignment questions addressed below are designed from the perspective of teaching this case to a business student audience. The case could certainly be adjusted to fit the needs of students in more technical disciplines.

Case overview

Set in March 2009, Charan Padmaraju, the CTO of redBus was grappling with his companies IT infrastructure and scalability issues. He was considering cloud computing as a solution to all his worries. redBus was founded in August 2006 as a bus ticketing company in India. From INR 50 lakhs of gross bookings in their first financial year 2006-07 to an estimated INR 300 million in gross bookings in the financial year ending 2008-09, redBus had registered phenomenal growth. From selling 10 tickets a day, it now sold more than 4,000 tickets a day for more than 5,000 routes across 15 states in India. However, the IT infrastructure of redBus could not match up with their business needs and required frequent upgrades. Charan thought “The procurement of new servers, upgrading existing servers and most of the developer's time went into circumventing scaling issues which were not adding values to our core business.” He wondered “Can cloud computing be an answer to all my worries? “But what exactly is cloud computing? Will it solve my existing scalability issues? How reliable it is? Is it expensive? What is the time for deployment?”

Expected learning outcomes

To understand what is a business model; to appreciate the technical issues related to business expansion decisions; to explain the concepts behind cloud based solutions; and to demonstrate how adoption of the cloud solution can enable an organization to achieve competitive advantage.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar, Rahul Thakurta and Anusha Sreeram

The case deals with the Bullwhip phenomena that can be observed in a supply chain.

Abstract

Subject area

The case deals with the Bullwhip phenomena that can be observed in a supply chain.

Study level/applicability

This case is suitable for all levels of students, undergraduate MBA to Executive MBA classes and practitioners. Assignment questions are designed from the perspective of teaching this case to a business student audience. The case is ideally suited for a supply chain management course and can be introduced to demonstrate the bullwhip effect in an operations management course.

Case overview

Set in May 2011, the case presents the discussions in the meeting summoned by Mr Srinivas, the director (technical) of Health Pharma (not the name of a real organization) in response to the huge losses faced by the organization in the last financial year. The discussions point to the inability of the organization to appropriately forecast demand across the different echelons and also absence of information transparency, leading to the loss. The catastrophe indicated the need to adopt an ERP solution, which was earlier overlooked by Health Pharma management.

Expected learning outcomes

These are an introduction to the concepts of the bullwhip effect and the case presents a managerial solution to the supply chain problem demonstrated.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for facilitating the instructor to present and discuss the case in a classroom setting.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 18 February 2014

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar, Sindhuja Menon and Arundhati Dutta

Power and politics.

Abstract

Subject area

Power and politics.

Study level/applicability

This case is suitable for all levels of students, undergraduate MBA to Executive MBA classes and practitioners. Assignment questions are designed from the perspective of teaching this case to a business student audience.

Case overview

A raging dispute between Kerala and Tamil Nadu over the 116-year-old Mullaperiyar Dam was in the national spotlight after mild tremors shook nearby areas. The Mullaperiyar Dam was located in Idukki district of Kerala in India. The dam was filled to its maximum permissible level of 136 ft. Tamil Nadu wanted the storage capacity to be increased by raising the dam height from 136 ft (41.5 m) to 142 ft (43 m) as per a 2006 Supreme Court directive to meet the growing irrigation needs of the state. The dam was vital for people living in the drought-prone districts of Theni, Dindigul, Madurai, Sivagangai and Ramanathapuram of Tamil Nadu. It irrigated about 220,000 acres and supplied drinking water to Madurai city and several towns. Kerala on the other hand wants a new dam as it feared that a strong earthquake might damage the existing dam. Chief Minister of Kerala, Oommen Chandy said: “I strongly believe that only a new dam can provide safety to the people of Kerala. We are only concerned about the safety of the people. But, unfortunately, there is a feeling in Tamil Nadu that the situation of panic here is a created one. That is not at all correct”. However, Tamil Nadu Government said the dam was safe as it had undergone periodic repairs during 1980-1994 with Kerala Government's approval. With the Kerala Government screaming loud over the danger that could be caused by the alleged obsolete 116 year old Mullaperiyar Dam on safety grounds of people who live downstream, why is Tamil Nadu defiant on any debate that cites the decommission of the controversial dam? Is the Tamil Nadu Government overlooking the issue for its personal benefits by putting the lives of 3 million people at stake?

Expected learning outcomes

The case would fit in a course for power and politics. It would also be appropriate for a modular course on regional development planning.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 3 December 2015

Srividya Raghavan and Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

Entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

MBA level – entrepreneurship courses, MA level – women empowerment issues, MBA – thriving in unstructured environments.

Case overview

Saundarya Rajesh, was the founder-president of AVTAR Career Creators (ACC) a talent consulting firm that offered solutions in training, hiring, selection process outsourcing and human resource information studies to over 400 clients. The case describes the progressive journey of Saundarya as an entrepreneur in discovering and exploiting opportunities as they arise at different points of her career. Saundarya did pioneering work for creating flexi-career opportunities that included tools for Flexidizing® and Unbundling® of jobs. She has won many accolades for her work that included Tie Stree Shakti Awards 2011 for excellence in entrepreneurship, Cavinkare's Chinnikrishnan Innovation Award for Outstanding Entrepreneurship 2011 and India Today's Business Wizards of Tamil Nadu, 2011. Saundarya was happy with the fact that there were 23,000 women currently on the AVTAR I-WIN network and there were 13-15 lakh more women whose talent could be harnessed. She dreamt of ensuring that 1.2 million Indian women, who had dropped out of the workforce in the past 10-15 years, could be brought back to contribute productively. While there appeared to be an acceptance of the flexible working concept among the potential employees and employers, several questions about the future potential of such a work-force needed to be answered.

Expected learning outcomes

To understand the factors that constitute entrepreneur's alertness such as personality traits, social networks and prior knowledge. To understand the importance of entrepreneur's alertness for identifying business opportunities. To understand types of entrepreneurial opportunities. To understand the opportunity identification triad: recognition, development and evaluation. To understand how to develop a business model in under-defined contexts.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

The case is suitable for a course on entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

The case is suitable for a course on entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for analysis in a MBA level course on entrepreneurship where the theories of opportunity recognition and exploitation can be introduced.

Case overview

Phanindra Sama, was the founder and CEO of redBus.in, the largest bus ticketing company in India selling around 220 million tickets per year and serving over 10,000 bus routes. The case describes the progressive journey of Phanindra as an entrepreneur in discovering and exploiting opportunities in India's fragmented bus industry. He had won many accolades in this process that included Global Shaper 2011 of the World Economic Forum and Entrepreneur of the year award under IT/ITES category by ETNow in 2011. In February 2012 redBus was listed in the world's top 50 most innovative companies by US business magazine Fast Company along with companies like Apple, Facebook, Google and Starbucks. While Phanindra was happy with the fact that there were 700 bus operators currently on the redBus network, several questions ran across his mind about the future of redBus. Is the current business model scalable? What might be the challenges that emerge in managing growth and scalability of such a business proposition? Is there a potential for a new business opportunity in scaling up?

Expected learning outcomes

To understand the factors that constitutes entrepreneur's alertness such as personality traits, social networks, prior knowledge.

To understand the importance of entrepreneur's alertness for identifying business opportunities.

To understand types of entrepreneurial opportunities.

To understand the opportunity identification triad: recognition, development and evaluation.

To understand how to develop a business idea into a viable business proposition.

Social implications

The case will provide sufficient insights for a budding entrepreneur to identify and exploit opportunities and become a successful entrepreneur.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available, please consult your librarian to access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar and Nitin Kumar Jain

– After 12.

Abstract

Title

After 12.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for analysis in an undergraduate/graduate entry level course on entrepreneurship. It may also be taught in a course for non-business majors who are unfamiliar with basic business concepts.

Case overview

Shrey Gupta and Manoj Agarwal were the co-owners of “After 12”, a food facility in the Dhanakwadi area of Pune, India. In only nine months, their food enterprise had become quite popular among the local college going crowd. They were doing brisk business and sales had picked up quite a bit in the last two months. They both were quite pleased with the progress of their business. However, in spite of increasing sales figures in the last few months they hardly generated any profits. The revenue they generated was completely spent on buying raw materials like vegetables and other food materials and the rest was used in the payment of utility bills and wages of the cook and the helper. They only had enough money to continue for another month or so. Both pondered about what is the way to proceed. What can be done to make it sustainable? How would they arrange the extra money to get them going? Should they close down “After 12”?

Expected learning outcomes

The case will aid students to understand: how small businesses are started and may fail; the importance of researching your business idea; and SWOT analysis.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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