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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Fatemeh Taheri

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which family-supportive organizational environment is associated with lower levels of turnover intention through higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which family-supportive organizational environment is associated with lower levels of turnover intention through higher levels of work-family enrichment and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 300 employees, the bootstrap procedure for estimating indirect correlations in multiple mediator models was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that employees experiencing high levels of family-supportive organizational environment are likely to report lower intention to leave their profession by virtue of their higher levels of job satisfaction and work-life enrichment.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to public organization and sample size. Further research is needed to make comparison between large/state-owned and small/private organizations.

Practical implications

In the Iran context, work-family enrichment and job satisfaction are effective in reducing the employees' turnover intention. Organizations should show concerns for the employees' work-life enrichment and job satisfaction to reduce their turnover intention.

Social implications

Turnover is one of the problems of organizations in many countries throughout the world including Iran, which has negative consequences through increasing the cost of organizations. The results of this study suggest ways in which staff retention could be improved.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to supportive organizational environment literature by addressing the relationship between family-supportive organizational environment and employee-related outcomes. Given some commonalities between Iran and other developing countries, the findings might be of potential interest in comparative studies dealing with the employees' turnover issue.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Takawira Munyaradzi Ndofirepi

This study aims to examine how spatial contexts, institutions and entrepreneurial self-identity affected the formation of entrepreneurial intentions of a sample of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how spatial contexts, institutions and entrepreneurial self-identity affected the formation of entrepreneurial intentions of a sample of students in Zimbabwe.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 284 students enrolled in two vocational education institutions located in Midlands Province of Zimbabwe. To select the respondents, convenience sampling was used. The sample size was determined by the total number of students agreeing to participate in the research. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling (maximum likelihood estimation method).

Findings

Social approval, supportive cultural environment and entrepreneurial self-identity had positive statistically significant direct effects on entrepreneurial intentions. Also, entrepreneurial self-identity partially mediated the effects of social approval and supportive cultural environment on entrepreneurial intentions. The total effect of supportive higher education institutions on entrepreneurial intentions was statistically significant, despite the direct and indirect effects being non-significant.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need to cultivate supportive social contexts and higher education institutions for nurturing entrepreneurial self-identity and entrepreneurial intentions, factors that are integral to the development of future entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The study examined the validity of a novel conceptual model based on the contribution of entrepreneurial self-identity, spatial context and institutional variables in shaping entrepreneurial intentions of selected college students in the global south.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Isabel Ma Prieto and Ma Pilar Pérez-Santana

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of high-involvement human resource practices in the innovative work behavior of employees, with the mediation of supportive

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11135

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of high-involvement human resource practices in the innovative work behavior of employees, with the mediation of supportive work environment conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses regression analysis to test the hypotheses in a sample of 198 Spanish firms.

Findings

The results indicate that ability-enhancing and opportunity-enhancing human resource practices are positively related to innovative work behaviors with the mediation of two work environment variables: management support and coworkers support. This study discusses results and highlights limitations and future research directions.

Originality/value

Previous researchers have identified employees as important sources of innovation, but systemic empirical research has not been fully applied to examine the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and employees' innovative work behavior.

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Publication date: 25 November 2021

Vanessa Kurdi, Mireille Joussemet and Geneviève A. Mageau

This chapter explores how self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017), an empirical theory about human motivation and personality, aligns with principles and…

Abstract

This chapter explores how self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017), an empirical theory about human motivation and personality, aligns with principles and practices of social and emotional learning (SEL) within the school context. Through its emphasis on basic psychological needs (BPN) for autonomy, competence, and relatedness, SDT proposes a broad perspective on how the social context can facilitate the development of social and emotional skills, which complements SEL programs. Research anchored in SDT has indeed established that students' academic, social, and emotional skills are determined at least partly by the extent to which their BPN are fulfilled in their learning environment. SDT also brings attention to the motivation and goals underlying the teaching and learning of social and emotional skills. Although SDT-based interventions mainly target the school or the classroom climate rather than students' skills, they can also foster the development of the five core social and emotional competencies defined by CASEL (2005). Implications and future directions for practices and research integrating SDT-based principles and interventions within SEL programs and practices are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2019

Brian Wright

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between supportive campus measures and student learning outcomes for first-generation students and non-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between supportive campus measures and student learning outcomes for first-generation students and non-first generation students to determine if variances are present. A lack of social capital of first generation when compare to non-first-generation students is theorized to be a contributing factor driving differences between the two groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Research survey design using penalized regression methods to quantify differences between groups. The analysis used 10 years of student engagement data.

Findings

Final analysis showed that first-generation student outcomes had little to no significant connection with the administrative focused aspects of the campus environment as compared to non-first-generation that represented highly significant relationships. This results supports the theory that first-generation students may simply be unaware of how to leverage these resources do to social capital disadvantages.

Practical Implications

The result suggests that universities should reconsider first-generation programs to ensure that they have the capability to address first-generation students’ lack of social capital. The primary method by which social capital is generated is through networking or peer groups expansion. Consequently, first-generation students might benefit greatly from student mentors that are not first-generation students to help aid in the transition to college as compared to participating in programs that group and isolate first-generation students together.

Originality/value

Very few studies have attempted to use social capital as a theoretical framework to explain differences in how first-generation and non-first-generation student learning outcomes relate to campus engagement variables. Moreover, no studies have used both penalized regression and bootstrap validation in addressing this issue, making the study original in design and analysis.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Sheryl Chummar, Parbudyal Singh and Souha R. Ezzedeen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of work passion on life satisfaction and job performance through a work–life conflict path and a work–life enrichment…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of work passion on life satisfaction and job performance through a work–life conflict path and a work–life enrichment path. The authors also consider individual and contextual factors under which these relationships are affected. Implications for researchers and HR practitioners are highlighted.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual paper draws mainly on conservation of resources theory to explore the differential impact of work passion on the work–life interface and, consequently, on life satisfaction and job performance.

Findings

The authors theorize how two types of passion – harmonious and obsessive – relate to both work–family conflict and work–family enrichment. Given the emphasis on resources in these relationships, the authors also consider the moderating effects of psychological detachment and a supportive work–family organizational culture. Finally, the authors demonstrate the significant impact of studying the passion/work–family relationship by illustrating its effects on two important outcomes for individuals and organizations, namely life satisfaction and job performance.

Originality/value

Although the study of work passion is gaining attention from management scholars, little research has examined its influence on job performance and the work–life interface. This paper advances the authors’ knowledge in these areas. Furthermore, the authors argue the importance of considering both the individual and organizational contexts wherein the experience of work passion plays out.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Marcello Russo

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which diversity in goal orientation is associated with decreased team performance by virtue of reduced group information…

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5403

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which diversity in goal orientation is associated with decreased team performance by virtue of reduced group information elaboration. In addition, the model considers the moderating role of internal team environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an empirical research in which the hypothesized relationships are investigated using hierarchical multiple‐regression analyses.

Findings

The findings show that teams high in diversity in goal orientation report lower levels of performance because of the lower group information elaboration. However, in the presence of a supportive team environment the negative relationship of diversity in goal orientation on group information elaboration are reduced.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a cross‐sectional design.

Practical implications

The paper suggests management should consider goal orientation in team building, and provide interventions to improve team environment.

Social implications

Diversity has relevant consequences on interpersonal relations, decision‐making processes, and team performance. The results of the present study suggest ways in which teams might leverage the benefits of diversity and reduce coordination problems associated with it.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the diversity team literature by expanding Nederveen‐Pieterse and colleagues' research on diversity in goal orientation by emphasizing the role of internal team environment as moderator in the relationship between diversity in goal orientation and group information elaboration.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Samina M. Saifuddin, Lorraine S. Dyke and Maria Rasouli

The goals of this study were to examine the utility of social cognitive career theory in a South Asian context, extend SCCT beyond its individualistic roots to include…

Abstract

Purpose

The goals of this study were to examine the utility of social cognitive career theory in a South Asian context, extend SCCT beyond its individualistic roots to include social and contextual variables, and explore the possible differential validity of SCCT predictors for men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved an in‐class survey of Bangladeshi undergraduate engineering students including 209 women and 640 men.

Findings

Despite stronger relationships between persistence and two predictors – social aspirations and self‐efficacy – for men, self‐efficacy, the core construct of SCCT, was the most important predictor of persistence for both women and men thus supporting the applicability of SCCT in non‐Western contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Several new measures were developed for this study which provide a basis for future research but will require further validation. The results demonstrated the applicability of SCCT in a non‐Western context but the amount of variance explained was modest. Thus, additional research into context‐specific factors affecting persistence is warranted.

Practical implications

The results suggest that interventions intended to enhance the participation of women in non‐traditional fields such as engineering should focus on enhancing self‐efficacy, potentially through creating a more supportive learning environment.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the first to assess the applicability of SCCT in a non‐Western context and to examine the differential validity of SCCT predictors for women and men.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Torill Larsen, Aurelie Van Hoye, Hege Eikeland Tjomsland, Ingrid Holsen, Bente Wold, Jean-Philippe Heuzé, Oddrun Samdal and Philippe Sarrazin

The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is…

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2009

Abstract

Purpose

The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at optimizing their experiences in youth sport, namely the Empowering Coaching™ training program, based on self-determination theory (SDT) and achievement goal theory (AGT). It compares French and Norwegian coaches to suggest whether the principles of the Empowering Coaching™ training program can be applied successfully in the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The Empowering Coaching™ training program is a six hour workshop and was delivered at the beginning of the 2011 football season. At the end of the season, the grassroots coaches’ reflections on their coaching practices were examined through a qualitative approach with in-depth interviews of 18 coaches in France and Norway, applying a hybrid analyses and comparing country-wise.

Findings

All coaches expressed the intention to embrace the philosophy of the program, and to apply several of the strategies they had learnt during the workshop. The coaches perceived that the program supported their efforts to develop and implement strategies to stimulate intrinsic motivation, enjoyment and long-term participation among the players. There were some differences between coaches from France and Norway (e.g. rules and involvement), but the similarities were more evident, supporting the universality of applying SDT in the youth sport setting.

Social implications

The findings are encouraging for sport as a health promoting setting and for the development of the personal skills in grassroot coaches, as they imply that coaches who feel competent in how to structure practices and matches that provide the players with positive sport experiences are likely to enable players to feel supported and motivated.

Originality/value

This study explores qualitatively the impact of an intervention based on SDT and AGT, focussing on football coaches’ reflections on their coaching practices.

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Anjni Anand and Veena Vohra

The study aims at exploring the constructive role that organizations can play in enabling their employees move from work-family conflict (WFC) to a more integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims at exploring the constructive role that organizations can play in enabling their employees move from work-family conflict (WFC) to a more integrated work–life solution.

Design/methodology/approach

Being socially and culturally contextual by nature, a qualitative methodology that involved in-depth interviews with the respondents was chosen for the study. This facilitated the respondents to discuss in detail their WFC experiences and the expectations that they hold from their organizations.

Findings

The findings of the study suggested the importance of effective two-way communication between employees and top management, structural and cultural support from the organization and the importance of redesigning and restructuring jobs in an attempt to reduce work-role overload.

Practical implications

Organizations can foster initiatives that can lead to a healthier work–life balance of the employees, which can further result in a more creative, committed, satisfied and diverse workforce for them.

Social implications

A better work environment that facilitates smoother balance between work and non-work responsibilities can lead to better physical and psychological health of the employees and reduced instances of discord in work and family domains.

Originality/value

Most studies on WFC have focused on the adverse impact of WFC; the present study adopts a solution-oriented approach to finding ways in which resourceful entities such as big organizations can take steps in alleviating WFC experiences of their employees.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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