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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mark Bannan and Lynn Watson

A partnership of agencies in South West England commissioned a review of supported housing, with the primary aim of linking supported housing (and the Supporting People…

Abstract

A partnership of agencies in South West England commissioned a review of supported housing, with the primary aim of linking supported housing (and the Supporting People programme) with other regional strategies and initiatives such as housing, health, crime reduction and community safety. The review produced a new conceptual framework for the planning and management of housing and support services, with a strong emphasis on aims and outcomes. It also brought together data on current services across the region and identified key trends and issues to be addressed. Many of the recommendations and proposals have been incorporated into the draft Regional Housing Strategy, due to be finalised in May 2005.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Peter Molyneux

The National Housing Federation's initiative, In Business for Neighbourhoods, urges all housing associations to ensure that they focus on users, to diversify funding and…

Abstract

The National Housing Federation's initiative, In Business for Neighbourhoods, urges all housing associations to ensure that they focus on users, to diversify funding and manage costs, while working in partnerships with others to serve the whole population of a community or neighbourhood. General‐needs housing providers can't be ‘in business for neighbourhoods’ without meeting the needs of frail older people, care leavers, people recently released from prison or women fleeing domestic violence. Providers of supported housing hold in their hands many of the tools to enable this engagement.Supported housing is the only part of the housing association sector with a clear and untainted focus on users, the only part with a rigorous focus on costs and efficiency and the only part developed through partnership, owing everything to partnership. In their report, In Business to Support People ‐ the Future of Supported Housing, Julia Unwin and Peter Molyneux argue that supported housing agencies must be allowed to find ways to grow as organisations and to cope with a highly unstable market if they are to respond effectively to the challenges posed by increasing demand for citizenship and choice.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Kate Davies and Chris Kelly

This article is a study of how Nottinghamshire Drug and Alcohol Action Team used Drug Intervention Programme monies to support partnership working in Nottinghamshire to…

Abstract

This article is a study of how Nottinghamshire Drug and Alcohol Action Team used Drug Intervention Programme monies to support partnership working in Nottinghamshire to secure supported housing for drug‐using offenders who were fast‐tracked into treatment by their involvement with the Criminal Justice System. The article identifies lessons learnt in relation to partnership engagement, community involvement and the importance of involving wrap‐around services in holistic delivery of supported housing and treatment. It also identifies the ongoing challenges of meeting the needs of service users alongside those of housing providers, and looks at very quick wins in relation to housing for substance misusers from bond schemes and use of established debt advisors who can support individuals in their resettlement needs.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Lynn Vickery and Veronica Mole

The shared housing model has been used widely for many years in association with supported housing. It is the subject of debate among providers and commissioners, who may…

Abstract

The shared housing model has been used widely for many years in association with supported housing. It is the subject of debate among providers and commissioners, who may regard it as old‐fashioned and not conducive to independent living, but for some clients and organisations it continues to offer a positive option in helping alleviate loneliness and isolation. Current growth in the work of social landlords and their agents includes a wider range of client groups with a variety of aspirations and support needs. Shared housing may offer new opportunities to these groups. With the new emphasis on neighbourhoods and inclusion, does the shared housing model possess attributes that commend it to communities in new ways, or is it a model of the past? The article offers suggestions to enable shared housing to be evaluated as part of housing associations' business plans while keeping a focus on residents' views, as reflected in 25 case study locations.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Jonathan Hobson, Kenneth Lynch and Alex Lodge

The purpose of this paper is to examine how residualisation is experienced across a supported housing provider in an English county. The analysis is in three parts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how residualisation is experienced across a supported housing provider in an English county. The analysis is in three parts: firstly, it focuses on organisational provision, including impacts of change on decisions on market entry and exit; secondly, it reviews evidence on service provision and the adaptations services are making to reflect the changing pressures of the sector; finally, it considers the impacts on service delivery and the experiences of those that rely on the provision.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis uses interview data across the organisation, together with material from the UK Government department consultation (2017) and a UK Parliamentary Select Committee inquiry (2017) to examine the impacts across the different tiers of service, including the day-to-day experience of residualised services for those that deliver and receive that support.

Findings

The paper concludes that residualisation is a direct outcome of the neoliberalisation of welfare states, introducing limits to state involvement and funding, a greater emphasis on quasi-market involvement in the sector and a shifting of responsibility from government to individuals.

Research limitations/implications

It not only demonstrates the impacts of reducing state support on the supported housing sector but also emphasises the importance of residualisation as a conceptual framework applicable to the wider implications of austerity and neoliberal ideology.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the way that the burden of responsibility is being shifted away from the public provision of support and onto the individuals. This can be problematic for the individuals who are vulnerable as a result of their economic medical or social circumstances.

Social implications

The retreat of the state from supported housing is both a political change and an austerity-led change. This article provides insight from a single-supported housing provider. In so doing, it illustrates the pressure such an organisation is under.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique insight from the perspective of all levels of a supported housing service provider, combined with the analysis of government consultation and parliamentary inquiry.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jenny Pannell

Housing and support are essential if people misusing drugs and alcohol are to address their substance misuse and their other physical, mental and emotional health needs…

Abstract

Housing and support are essential if people misusing drugs and alcohol are to address their substance misuse and their other physical, mental and emotional health needs. If their housing and related support needs are not addressed at each stage of the treatment journey, they are much less likely to enter or remain in treatment. This article outlines the policy context, discusses barriers in service development, explores the role of housing with support for substance users and gives examples of imaginative commissioning and provision. It is based on recent work for the Department of Health Care Services Improvement Partnership.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Linda Nesse, Marianne Thorsen Gonzalez, Geir Aamodt and Ruth Kjærsti Raanaas

Recovery for residents who experience co-occurring problems and live in supported housing takes place in everyday contexts. This study aims to explore residents…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery for residents who experience co-occurring problems and live in supported housing takes place in everyday contexts. This study aims to explore residents’ self-reported recovery and quality of life and examine the relationships between these factors and issues in supported housing.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted at 21 supported housing sites in six cities across Norway. A total of 104 residents (76 men and 28 women) responded to measures of recovery (Recovery Assessment Scale – Revised), life satisfaction (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life), affect (single items), staff support (Brief INSPIRE) and sense of home (single items).

Findings

Linear regression analyses indicated associations between recovery and staff support (B = 0.01, 95% CI = 0.01-0.02, ß = 0.39), housing satisfaction (B = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.07-0.22, ß = 0.38), sense of home (B = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.14-0.32, ß = 0.49) and satisfaction with personal economy (B = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.05-0.17, ß = 0.33). Similarly, associations were found between life satisfaction and staff support (B = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.02-0.04, ß = 0.46), housing satisfaction (B = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.46-0.80, ß = 0.60), sense of home (B = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.42-0.87, ß = 0.51) and satisfaction with personal economy (B = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.19-0.50, ß = 0.39).

Originality/value

The findings imply that core issues in supported housing, namely, staff support, housing satisfaction, sense of home and satisfaction with personal economy, are associated with recovery and quality of life.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2010

Paul Sandford and Jim Shepherd

This paper considers the funding of supported housing schemes. These are schemes that house vulnerable people with special needs in the community. The paper looks at why…

Abstract

This paper considers the funding of supported housing schemes. These are schemes that house vulnerable people with special needs in the community. The paper looks at why the future of these schemes has been threatened by a series of legal decisions interpreting the housing benefit regulations.The paper analyses the relevant regulations and looks at how they apply to supported housing schemes. It then sifts through the details of the case law and concludes by looking at the lessons that may be learned in the future.

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Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Robin Johnson

Social inclusion means ensuring that all individuals, despite any particular perceived ‘differentness’ (Sayce, 2000; Harrison & Davis, 2001) or disadvantage in life, may…

Abstract

Social inclusion means ensuring that all individuals, despite any particular perceived ‘differentness’ (Sayce, 2000; Harrison & Davis, 2001) or disadvantage in life, may nevertheless feel at home in the world and find a sense of belonging in their local community. But the most important place to feel at home is at home.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Derek Kettlewell

The provision of supported housing is vital to the work of the National Probation Service as it seeks to reduce re‐offending and protect the public. Supporting People…

Abstract

The provision of supported housing is vital to the work of the National Probation Service as it seeks to reduce re‐offending and protect the public. Supporting People offers an opportunity for Probation to play a key role in developing supported housing services locally. Probation's experience in contracting for supported housing services for offenders means it is well placed to contribute to the work of the Supporting People team. There remain many issues to be resolved. Only recognition of the legitimacy of offender needs within Supporting People and in wider housing allocation and management policies will make Probation's investment in the process pay off.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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