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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Jessica M. Blomfield, Ashlea C. Troth and Peter J. Jordan

Sustainability is an emotional issue. It is also an issue that is gaining prominence in organizational agendas. In this chapter, we outline a model to explain how…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability is an emotional issue. It is also an issue that is gaining prominence in organizational agendas. In this chapter, we outline a model to explain how employees perceive change agents working to implement sustainability initiatives in organizations. Using this model, we argue that organizational support for sustainability can influence how employees respond to sustainability messages. We further argue that the intensity of emotions that change agents display, and how appropriate those emotions are within the organizational context, will influence how employees perceive those individuals and the success of their efforts to influence green outcomes.

Research implications

We extend the Dual Threshold Model of emotions (DTM: Geddes & Callister, 2007) to assess the impact of displays of emotional intensity on achieving sustainability goals. Our model links emotional propriety to change agent success. By exploring variations of the DTM in terms of contextual factors and emotional intensity, our model elaborates on the dynamic nature of emotional thresholds.

Practical implications

Using our framework, change agents may be able to improve their influence by matching the emotional intensity of their messages to the relevant display rules for that organization. That is, change agents who are perceived to express emotion within the thresholds of propriety can enhance their success in implementing green outcomes.

Originality/value

This chapter examines sustainability initiatives at the interpersonal behavior level. We combine aspects of organizational behavior, emotion in organizations, and organizations and the natural environment to create a new model for understanding change agent success in corporate sustainability.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Badri Munir Sukoco, Zuyyinna Choirunnisa, Mohammad Fakhruddin Mudzakkir, Ely Susanto, Reza Ashari Nasution, Sunu Widianto, Anas Miftah Fauzi and Wann-Yih Wu

Members' behaviour to support change is a critical factor in organisational change. Building on social cognitive theory, this research investigates how empowering…

Abstract

Purpose

Members' behaviour to support change is a critical factor in organisational change. Building on social cognitive theory, this research investigates how empowering leadership (EL) contributes to behavioural support for change in higher education. The paper argues that the relationship between EL and behavioural support for change is moderated by diversity climate.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, 107 colleges from the highest-ranking 11 universities in Indonesia, consisting of 1,634 faculties, participated in this study.

Findings

Members would experience higher support for change with EL. Furthermore, the positive relationship between EL and behavioural support for change was stronger in members who perceived a more diverse climate.

Originality/value

This study empirically tested how behaviour to support change was determined by leaders' empowering behaviour based on social cognitive theory in a high-power distance culture. In terms of its methodological contributions, this study used a multi-level analysis in order to test EL. Finally, the research on behavioural support for change has been expanded upon through a unit-level analysis.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Elodie Arnéguy, Marc Ohana and Florence Stinglhamber

Although justice perceptions have been proven to be a critical determinant of readiness for change (RFC), research is still needed to investigate which source(s) of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although justice perceptions have been proven to be a critical determinant of readiness for change (RFC), research is still needed to investigate which source(s) of justice fosters employee's preparedness to face change within his/her organization. The aim of this study is to examine the simultaneous influence of three sources of justice, namely the organization, the supervisor and the coworkers, on RFC through perceived organizational support, perceived supervisor support and perceived coworker support, respectively.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different sets of data were collected from employees in the United States and in Europe. Path analyses were performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that perceived organizational support mediates the relationship between organizational justice and RFC. Conversely, however, the effect of supervisory justice and coworkers justice on RFC was not mediated by perceived supervisor support and perceived coworker support.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the simultaneous influence of organizational, supervisory and coworkers justice on RFC. In doing so, it highlights the need to consider justice stemming from the organization as a priority when considering implementing an organizational change, as opposed to justice emanating from the supervisor and coworkers. In addition, this study responds to long-standing calls for the simultaneous examination of multiple sources of justice and the exploration of the largely neglected role of justice stemming from coworkers.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Rajiv R. Thakur and Shalini Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment in bridging the gap between resistance and readiness…

4009

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment in bridging the gap between resistance and readiness to change.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model including five constructs is developed. The questionnaire survey using the study variables readiness to change, trust, perceived organizational support, emotional attachment, and resistance to change was used in this study. Descriptive statistics and mediation regression analysis are used to test all hypotheses using the survey data of 276 middle-level managers.

Findings

The findings reflect how readiness to change reduces the impact of resistance to change during organizational change. Furthermore it also finds that how trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment mediates the relationship between resistance and readiness and reduces the gap between the two.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in the study have made significant contribution to the literature especially on middle-level managers in the Indian context. There was a paucity of research done on the study variables. The mediating effects of the study variable have never been explored earlier and therefore make an immense contribution to the field of knowledge for practitioners and academicians.

Practical implications

The research results have many practical implications. It could be established that trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment have a strong and positive association with the management of change. Linking of study variables during change is helpful for the top managers for better understanding during a major organizational change. Supporting the employees through human touch during change will lead to easier transition. Understanding of various dimensions that influence employee to readiness for organizational change is an important endeavor for organizational change.

Social implications

The research is of utmost significance for the top management as it can provide a better insight to understand and keep in mind the key aspects during organizational change in such a way that chances of resistance reduces to minimal. If the employees are contented by receiving support from their bosses, if there exists a mutual trust which increases emotional attachment, introducing change in the organization will be much easier for the management.

Originality/value

This research attempts to investigate how during times of turbulent change in an organization trust between the employees and their supervisor, perceived social support, and emotional attachment with the organization positively impact the change management process. The findings provide valuable insights for the top management to understand the psyche of its employees and provide them a human touch during the time of organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Sarah Kovoor‐Misra and Marlene A. Smith

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which individuals' identification with a changed organizational artifact is associated with their cognitive, behavioral, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which individuals' identification with a changed organizational artifact is associated with their cognitive, behavioral, and affective support for change in the later stages of a change effort, and the role of contextual variables in mediating these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Primarily quantitative with some qualitative data from an online organization that had acquired the non‐personnel assets of its competitor.

Findings

The paper finds that: artifacts can be an important part of employees' perceptions of their organizations; artifact identification is associated with cognitive and behavioral support in the later stages of a change effort; a positive perception of the change mediates between identification and cognitive and behavioral support, and also facilitates affective support; emotional exhaustion is a marginal mediator; and trust towards top managers does not play a mediating role.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could study the factors that influence artifact identification. Studies of support for change must address its various dimensions to more accurately assess support.

Practical implications

During the later stages of change, managers can foster artifact identification, highlight the positives, and reduce emotional exhaustion to ensure support.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the relationship between artifact identification and support for change in the later stages of a change effort, and the mediating role of contextual factors. In addition, it investigates the multi‐dimensional aspects of support for change, an area that has received limited empirical research attention.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Zhao Pan, Yaobin Lu, Sumeet Gupta and Qian Hu

The intense competitive and dynamic environment in mobile social-media market forces service providers to introduce incremental technological changes to achieve…

Abstract

Purpose

The intense competitive and dynamic environment in mobile social-media market forces service providers to introduce incremental technological changes to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what and how the user attitude to change influences members' behavioral support for incremental technological change in mobile social media service.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the tripartite model of attitude, this study examines the influence of the cognitive aspect (empowerment with change), affective aspect (arousal with change) and behavioral aspect (habit to change) of attitude toward change on members' behavioral support for incremental technological change. Drawing on the commitment to change theory, we assessed the underlying mechanism by which attitudes toward change influences behavioral support for incremental technological change through the two components of commitment to change (i.e. affective and normative commitment to change). We tested the model using structural equation modeling on the data collected from the popular mobile social media services in China.

Findings

Our results indicate that the effect of empowerment with change, arousal with change and habit to change varies with different dimensions of commitment to change and significant influence of commitment to change on members' behavioral support for incremental technological change.

Practical implications

The findings of this study contribute to better insights for services providers for implementing incremental technological change strategies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theory of incremental technological changes by empirical examination of the impacts of users' attitudes toward change on members' behavioral support for incremental technological change in mobile social media. The paper extends the commitment to change theory with the discussion of the mediating effect of commitment to change in the continuing members' behavioral support for incremental technological change in mobile social media.

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Sarich Chotipanich and Bev Nutt

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be…

3048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be positioned and repositioned to meet the needs and expectations of an organisation, its staff and customers, as priorities shift and business circumstances change?

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were undertaken to investigate the precise nature and reasons for change to FM support arrangements, across a variety of organisational types and sectors. Data were collected through document searches, semi‐structured interviews, direct observations and supplementary questionnaires and follow‐up discussions. Field trials of this prototype framework were conducted to obtain expert opinions, comments, criticisms and suggestions for improvement, employing a methodology similar to that used in clinical trials for new medical procedures.

Findings

The main findings from the investigations cover the nature and purpose of change in FM and the key factors that were involved. A number of major opportunities for innovative developments in the facility management field were uncovered, together with five key areas for further research, through which to advance the role and remit of facility management generally.

Originality/value

The research here has produced a generic decision framework for positioning and repositioning FM support arrangements. This framework will enable facility managers to adopt a more secure approach for collecting essential information, identifying key issues and options, and should encourage a more rigorous and critical examination of alternative FM arrangements prior to implementation.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Gechinti Bede Onyeneke and Tomokazu Abe

The purpose of this paper is to examine how change leadership activities help bring about employee support for planned organizational change.

2826

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how change leadership activities help bring about employee support for planned organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a non-experimental quantitative research design, and a self-administered Likert-type questionnaire survey, the study sourced data from employees in an organization undergoing significant change. Data analysis was by structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

Change leadership behaviors bearing on; visioning, communication, participation, support and concern for change participants' interests were found to be of significant importance in ensuring employee buy-in and support for planned change efforts. Although change leadership had no direct effect on employees' behavioral intentions to support change, it was strongly related to employee cognitive appraisal of change. The relationship between change leadership and employee behavioral intentions to support planned change was serially mediated by employee cognitive appraisal and emotional response toward the planned change event.

Practical implications

In appraising planned organizational change efforts, managers tend to focus on employee behaviors toward the change instead of conditions that drive such behaviors. This study underscores the need to focus on employee attitudes as precursors to desired behavior toward change.

Originality/value

Prior research suggests that change leadership behaviors affect employee attitudinal reactions to change but yet lacked empirical validation. By applying a multidimensional approach to attitude and investigating its hierarchy of effects, this study enhanced our accuracy in explaining the influence change leadership has on employee attitudinal support for change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Leslie T. Szamosi and Linda Duxbury

Discusses the use of the act frequency approach methodology to develop and validate a measure of organizational support of revolutionary change. A total of nine unique…

8765

Abstract

Discusses the use of the act frequency approach methodology to develop and validate a measure of organizational support of revolutionary change. A total of nine unique behaviors, describing three constructs, were viewed by employees as supportive of revolutionary change; and 12 unique behaviors, describing two constructs, were perceived as being non‐supportive of revolutionary change. The measures developed were found to have high internal reliability. The measures were also found to be highly correlated with relevant individual and organizational outcome measures. These results provide empirical support for the idea that how an organization supports revolutionary change can have an impact on both the organization and its employees and that contextual variable may not influence perceptions.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Steven M. Elias and Rakesh Mittal

Although organizations change on a regular basis, much of what we know about the impacts of organizational change can best be described as macro‐level information. Only…

2959

Abstract

Purpose

Although organizations change on a regular basis, much of what we know about the impacts of organizational change can best be described as macro‐level information. Only recently have scholars begun to examine the impact of organizational change at the level of the individual employee (i.e. micro level). The purpose of this paper is to assess the importance of a supervisor's support for a change initiative in relation to employee job satisfaction and job involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This research made use of archival data. Police officers (n=88) were randomly selected from across the USA to complete phone interviews meant to assess, in part, supervisor support for a change from traditional policing to community policing, job satisfaction, and job involvement.

Findings

While supervisor support for the change initiative was found to be related to job satisfaction and job involvement, job satisfaction mediated the supervisor support‐job involvement relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of this study is its small sample, which precluded the use of more advanced statistical techniques (i.e. structural equation modeling). The major implication is that both employees and the organization stand to benefit during a change initiative if the supervisor demonstrates his or her support for the initiative.

Originality/value

This research is of value given the prevalence of organizational change and the need for more research examining the impact of change on micro‐level issues.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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