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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Abbas Foroughi

The purpose of this research was to address the critical need for supply chain workforce training to empower employees to use new digital technologies and to identify and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to address the critical need for supply chain workforce training to empower employees to use new digital technologies and to identify and evaluate current sources of supply chain training.

Design/methodology/approach

An online search was performed to locate training that is available for supply chain employees. Training providers who met the online delivery criterion were identified and evaluated on: (1) amount of supply chain content and/or digital technology content, (2) flexibility, (3) customizable and (4) credentials offered.

Findings

Several sources of supply chain training were identified—supply chain professional organizations, consultants, MOOC courses and MicroMasters programs at colleges and universities.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are limited by the fact that the number of supply chain training providers identified is not exhaustive and because the study examined training opportunities available at a particular point in time. Course offerings will change over time; certification requirements will be updated, and new providers will appear.

Practical implications

By identifying sources of supply chain training that are currently available to help bridge this serious skill shortage, the results can serve as a guide to enterprises moving toward supply chain digitalization.

Social implications

To succeed in the current environment of digital transformation, employees need opportunities to build digital skills that are demanded by corporations around the world. This is especially important at a time when unemployment is at an alarming rate.

Originality/value

An earlier version of the paper was presented at the 2019 Meeting of the Decision Sciences Institute, November 23–25, 2019, in New Orleans, LA.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Robert E. Overstreet, Joseph B. Skipper, Joseph R. Huscroft, Matt J. Cherry and Andrew L. Cooper

The purpose of this study is to empirically evaluate the relationship between learning culture, workforce level, human capital and operational performance in two diverse…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically evaluate the relationship between learning culture, workforce level, human capital and operational performance in two diverse supply chain populations, aircraft maintenance and logistics readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon competence-based view of the firm and human capital theory, this paper analyzes data from two studies.

Findings

The results provide support for the hypothesized model. Workforce level moderates the relationship between learning culture and human capital, and human capital partially mediates the relationship between learning culture and operational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have implications for behavioral supply chain management research and implications for educating and training the supply chain management workforce. While the populations represent a diverse set of logistics functions and responsibilities, the participants are all military members, which may limit generalizability.

Practical implications

This study should help leaders understand the importance of learning culture and the perceived differences in its effect on human capital based upon workforce level.

Originality/value

This research is among the first to investigate the role of workforce level and answers a multitude of calls for research into the human side of supply chain management.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Michael J. Maloni, Stacy M. Campbell, David M. Gligor, Christina R. Scherrer and Elizabeth M. Boyd

Despite a pervasive workforce shortage, existing research has provided limited guidance about job satisfaction and commitment of the supply chain workforce. Moreover, few…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite a pervasive workforce shortage, existing research has provided limited guidance about job satisfaction and commitment of the supply chain workforce. Moreover, few studies explore the effects of workforce level on such satisfaction and commitment. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this gap, the authors apply person-organization fit theory to study the critical work value drivers of supply chain job satisfaction and industry commitment across workforce levels through structural modeling of practitioner survey data.

Findings

Job satisfaction and industry commitment are impacted differently across workforce levels, particularly for executives, suggesting the potential for conflicts in the workplace and that a “one size fits all” approach for recruitment and retention will be ineffective.

Practical implications

The results reveal how proactive organizations can not only hire and retain the best people but also help employees at different workforce levels understand one another’s motivations, empowering these organizations to become employers of choice.

Originality/value

This study is among the first empirical papers to directly address the labor shortage in supply chain. It also strikes new ground by assessing differences in work values across workforce levels.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Rose Opengart, Peter M. Ralston and Steve LeMay

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of myopia and introduce the concept of labor market myopia (LMM), as well as the role that human resources management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of myopia and introduce the concept of labor market myopia (LMM), as well as the role that human resources management (HRM) plays in its prevention and resolution. LMM, a more specific form of factor market myopia (FMM), is a myopic view of labor needs. LMM is only going to increase as human capital becomes increasingly scarce due to labor shortages.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual review focuses on research on factor market rivalry (FMR) in the supply chain. Using three sample job categories, the concept of myopia is applied toward the human resources context to propose a new term describing a failure to consider future labor needs.

Findings

The authors position HRM/talent management as critical in preventing and addressing LMM at both firm and industry levels and the critical role of labor markets in FMR. HR strategies are suggested to prevent LMM include: expansion of the available workforce; increasing current workforce productivity, economic remedies like paying higher wages and proactively assessing and forecasting the current and future human resource capacity and needs.

Practical implications

Labor needs to be considered as a factor in the same realm of importance as other resources. The HR strategies discussed are key to preventing LMM and improving organizational performance and effectiveness.

Originality/value

The authors argue that organizations not only compete for resources downstream (i.e. customers and markets) but also upstream, such as with human resources. The authors introduced a new concept/term to frame the effect on organizations when supply chain planning and HR strategy do not take labor into consideration. This was accomplished by first narrowing the concept of marketing myopia to FMM, and in this conceptual paper, it was subsequently narrowed to introduce the term LMM.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Andrea Stefano Patrucco, Liliana Rivera, Christopher Mejía-Argueta and Yossi Sheffi

In line with the knowledge-based view of organizations, this paper aims to analyze how supply chain (SC) employees contribute to the creation of competitive advantage…

Abstract

Purpose

In line with the knowledge-based view of organizations, this paper aims to analyze how supply chain (SC) employees contribute to the creation of competitive advantage through knowledge acquisition and utilization activities. The authors consider SC employees' skills and competencies, their external network of relationships, their job satisfaction and company investments in training and test how they relate to SC-level outcomes (i.e. SC growth).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors design a research model including the aforementioned variables, and the authors apply structural equation modeling (SEM) to survey data collected from 246 SC professionals in Latin America. The authors also use multi-group analysis to evaluate how the relationships between these variables change with different levels of company investment in training.

Findings

The results show that a broad professional network of relationships contributes to increasing the skills and competencies of SC professionals, which, in turn, impact job satisfaction and SC performance. This reinforces the value of investing in skilled human talent, who can contribute to knowledge acquisition, utilization, and, ultimately, to SC competitiveness. Companies that invest more in training to develop their SC employees benefit from stronger SC outcomes.

Originality/value

This study contributes to broadening the understanding of the impact of human resource management (HRM) on supply chain management (SCM). One of the added original foci of this research is the emphasis on developing countries where these HRM-to-SCM performance relationships have not been studied before.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

Rosanna Cole, Noor Al-Ma'aitah and Rima Al Hasan

This paper presents an empirical study of a Syrian refugee workforce in textile export from Jordan. The purpose of this study is to determine the challenges of integrating…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an empirical study of a Syrian refugee workforce in textile export from Jordan. The purpose of this study is to determine the challenges of integrating Syrian refugees into the local workforce and to consider the implications of these challenges for the global supply chain aiming to create stable trade.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via three face-to-face focus group interviews with refugee workers and managers at a clothing factory site in Al-Duleil, Zarqa. Data were analysed using the Gioia methodology.

Findings

Worker attitudes, factory environment, and government support are important factors for refugees' workforce participation. The success of integrating Syrian refugees into the Jordanian workforce was largely a matter of their attitudes, commitment and motivations for taking up manufacturing work. Misconceptions about the roles refugees will undertake were identified, which results in fewer people becoming self-sufficient through employment.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to understanding refugees' long-term integration in the host country by investigating refugee workers' and their managers' perspectives. Considering the views of multiple stakeholders enrichs the literature on refugees' integration.

Social implications

Understanding refugees' perspectives facilitates their integration in the host country which leads to improvement in their wellbeing and quality of life. More broadly, Jordan's approach to integrating refugees into the economy is seen as a development opportunity rather than a crisis to be handled.

Originality/value

Rather than focus on the procedures of integrating refugees in the host country, this study provides the voices of refugee migrant workers themselves, thereby offering a more complete picture of those factors shaping refugees' (dis)integration in local communities.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Roger Ayimbillah Atinga, Samuel Dery, Simon Peter Katongole and Moses Aikins

The study drew on capacity framework around the individual, organisational, health system and wider context to explore gaps in health supply chain (HSC) workers capacity…

Abstract

Purpose

The study drew on capacity framework around the individual, organisational, health system and wider context to explore gaps in health supply chain (HSC) workers capacity and competency to perform supply chain (SC) functions and the lessons for workforce development.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method study was conducted across the Northern Region of Ghana. Qualitative data were collected from in-depth interviews with 34 key SC managers at the regional, district and facility levels. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered through the RedCap mobile app to 233 core HSC workers and non-core workers (clinicians with additional responsibilities in SC). Data were managed and analysed inductively and deductively for themes.

Findings

Weak knowledge and competency in SC functions attributed to poor training exposure and organisational support for capacity building, undermined the capacity to perform basic SC functions, especially by the non-core category. The policy and regulatory environment of the HSC marketplace were described as fluid and with complexity of demands. Both worker categories, therefore, requested functional, technical, managerial and customer care competencies to anticipate and manage complexities. Structural characteristics of the health system giving narrow decision space to HSC workers cascaded the capacity for innovation and initiative and promoted frustrations among mid-level managers. Infrastructural deficits and shortfalls in operational resources scaled back the capacity to efficiently manage inventory and ensure that commodities reach clients in good quality.

Originality/value

Finding suggest that capacity building of HSC workers, strengthening of health institutions structural and resource capacity, and leveraging on technology will enable optimal performance of HSC functions.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Niall Piercy and Nick Rich

The adoption of lean operational practices and independently the uptake of business practices related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility continues to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The adoption of lean operational practices and independently the uptake of business practices related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility continues to grow. Past research has hinted at relationships between these two areas – suggesting that “lean is green” (e.g. Florida, 1996). The lean mantra of waste reduction and “doing more with less” is immediately apparent as delivering environmental benefits and has formed the basis of past research (e.g. Hughes, 2012). Almost all research linking lean operations or lean supply chains to sustainability issues have focused exclusively on environmental impact. The purpose of this paper is to explore the broader sustainability benefits of lean operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a longitudinal multi-year (up to four years observation), multi-case analysis (n=5).

Findings

The paper reports that lean operations meet a wide range of sustainability outcomes beyond environmental benefits (including supply monitoring, transparency, workforce treatment, and community engagement). The paper specifies the internal and external policies, procedures, tools, and strategies for implementation of lean and sustainable operations management (OM). This is encapsulated in the development of a stage-based theoretical model of lean-sustainability. Further, it is proposed that lean implementation and sustainability performance are in fact interlinked.

Originality/value

Past research on the role of lean operations in improving sustainably has focused almost exclusively on environmental benefits accruing from toolkit/workplace level waste reduction. This paper demonstrates that lean provides more than a toolkit (a philosophy and strategic direction) and that this meets a wide range of sustainable outcomes. This finding makes major contributions to conceptualising how lean operations influence sustainability outcomes. The paper develops the first integrative stage-based model of lean and sustainable OM.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

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Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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