Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Hadi Balouei Jamkhaneh and Abdol Hamid Safaei Ghadikolaei

The aim of this study is to develop a framework for measuring of service supply chain (SSC) maturity process.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to develop a framework for measuring of service supply chain (SSC) maturity process.

Design/methodology/approach

The main framework of the SSC maturity was developed by reviewing the concepts and models of SSC, business excellence, maturity and supply chain performance evaluation. Then, the maturity level of each excellence criterion was defined in the proposed model by using the excellence criteria for SSC and the concept of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PDCA) cycle in combination with the process survey tools maturity model. Based on the excellence criteria and their maturity levels, a questionnaire was designed to practically measure the proposed framework.

Findings

The concepts and features of maturity levels defined for each of the excellence criteria were used to implement and operationalize the proposed framework and evaluate the SSC processes.

Practical implications

Through the assessment of the existing status of SSC processes, the findings allow managers to reach a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of such processes. Then, some opportunities are provided for improving each excellence criterion to enhance the performance of each process.

Originality/value

In fact, this study provides guidelines for organizations to measure their progress and performance and improve their management systems. The main advantages of the proposed SSC measurement framework include self-assessment facilitation, calculation of criteria scores and development of uses. The proposed model, like quality and productivity awards, can pave the way for increased competitiveness of the service industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Heriberto Garcia Reyes and Ronald Giachetti

This research aims to develop a supply chain maturity model so that Mexican firms can evaluate their current supply chain operations and develop an improvement road‐map.

Downloads
3099

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to develop a supply chain maturity model so that Mexican firms can evaluate their current supply chain operations and develop an improvement road‐map.

Design/methodology/approach

The Delphi Method was used with 80 experts in Mexico. The Delphi Method gathers multiple perspectives on supply chain operations and delineates a path to reach a group consensus. The results lead to the specification of a supply chain maturity model S(CM)2. S(CM)2 is validated through experimentation and a pilot test to verify the ability of the model to help managers assess the supply chain processes of a firm by identifying their maturity level in each model viewpoint. A pilot test with a Mexican firm demonstrates the practical implementation of the model.

Findings

The research results in a meta‐model, called the supply chain maturity model S(CM)2, that describes supply chain maturity at five levels across multiple competency areas, and provides guidance to specify an improvement plan.

Research limitations/implications

The meta‐model was developed in Mexico and may not apply to the operations of supply chains in other countries. Additionally, the large scope of the meta‐model calls for further testing and refinement.

Practical implications

The research provides a means for firms to evaluate their supply chain operations and develop improvement plans.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by integrating the ideas of reference frameworks, capability maturity models, and improvement processes and demonstrates how a holistic meta‐model can be developed to evaluate supply chain operations.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Kevin McCormack, Marcelo Bronzo Ladeira and Marcos Paulo Valadares de Oliveira

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the relationship between supply chain maturity and performance, with specific references both to the business process…

Downloads
5758

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the relationship between supply chain maturity and performance, with specific references both to the business process orientation maturity model and to the supply chain operation reference model.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative, survey based research was carried out with 478 Brazilian companies. Statistical analysis combined the use of descriptive statistics and structural equation modeling.

Findings

Empirical results indicate a strong and positive statistical relationship between supply chain maturity and performance. The results also suggest that the deliver process maturity has a higher impact on overall performance than the other supply chain processes.

Research limitations/implications

Quantifying supply chain maturity and performance is an opportunity for a company to align its performance measurements and process improvement actions with its broader policies and strategies. The use of this approach has been validated in several previous research studies in organizational self‐assessment and business management.

Practical implications

Maturity models are valuable frameworks for corporate leadership. This study provides solid statistical evidence that a company that has achieved a higher maturity level and implemented the maturity factors also has achieved superior performance. It also validates the application of these specific maturity factors in South America, specifically Brazil.

Originality/value

This paper confirms and expands upon earlier research suggesting higher levels of process maturity were related to superior performance. This paper also examines the evolution of performance measurement systems, moving from a traditional approach to a more process oriented perspective by reporting on the origins of maturity models and presenting the main empirical contributions through the use of the business process maturity model and supply chain operation reference model.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Emmelie Gustafsson, Patrik Jonsson and Jan Holmström

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer…

Downloads
1034

Abstract

Purpose

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer physically fitting products. Digital product fitting is an emerging operational practice in retail that uses digital models of products and customers to match product supply to customer requirements. This paper aims to explore potential supply chain outcomes of digitalizing the operational practice of product fitting. The purpose is to explore and propose the potential of the practice to improve responsiveness to customer requirements and the utilization of existing variety in mass-produced products.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model of product fitting is developed to specify three levels of digitalization and potential outcomes for each level. Potential outcomes are developed based on empirical data from a case survey of three technology-developing companies, 13 retail cases and a review of academic literature.

Findings

With increasing maturity of digital product fitting, the practice can be used for more purposes. Besides matching product supply to customer demand, the practice can improve material flows, customer relationship management, assortment planning and product development. The practice of digital product fitting is most relevant for products where the final product configuration is difficult to make to order, product and customer attributes are easily measurable and tacit knowledge of customers and products can be formalized using digital modeling.

Research limitations/implications

Potential outcomes are conceptualized and proposed. Further research is needed to observe actual outcomes and understand the mechanisms for both proposed and surprising outcomes in specific contexts.

Practical implications

The maturity model helps companies assess how their operations can benefit from digital product fitting and the efforts required to achieve beneficial outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to describe the potential outcomes of introducing digital product fitting in retail supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Diego León Peña Orozco, Jesus Gonzalez-Feliu, Leonardo Rivera and Camilo Andres Mejía Ramirez

The purpose of this research is to determine the convenience of using a contract model as an integration mechanism for decision-making in a decentralized supply chain of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine the convenience of using a contract model as an integration mechanism for decision-making in a decentralized supply chain of small agricultural producers in a developing country, taking as hypothesis coordinated chain achieves better management. The analysis is based on information obtained by direct inquiry to 99 small producers in the region, about planning, production, marketing and distribution in the chain, supplemented with secondary information sources.

Design/methodology/approach

As a methodology an analysis of maturity in the chain based on the Capability Maturity Model Integration is done, whose evaluation is later analyzed as a fuzzy logic model, with the support of the fuzzy logic of the MATLAB toolbox, to study the convenience of the use of the contract against the other mechanisms, and to establish an approximation to the level of readiness of the chain toward integration.

Findings

Results obtained show that the small farmer supply chain studied, from a maturity perspective, has a strong disposition for the use of contracts as an integration mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

The supply chain for small producers presents a high dispersion, little consolidated offer capacity and lack of coordination. Limitations in terms of information and criteria unification are a challenge for future research. Results have socioeconomic implications for small producers and can serve as a guide to formulate policies by the governments in Latin American countries.

Practical implications

As practical implications, it can be stated that the use of supply contracts is a real mechanism that can be implemented in this type of chain, to break the mistrust between the echelons and improve the supply chain performance. This research will allow to establish support programs from local governments for the sustainability and improving income of small producers. In addition, contracts will allow to formalize the linkage of small producers to a sustainable commercial network.

Social implications

Small agricultural producers in developing countries live in unfavorable conditions, with socioeconomic limitations. This work offers an alternative for their productive activity development that will allow them access to marketing chains in a safe way and improve their living conditions.

Originality/value

Previous studies related to the maturity toward the chain integration and fuzzy logic as a hybrid methodology, were not found in the literature, and less even applied to a chain of small agricultural products.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Ingrid Saiala Cavalcante de Souza Feitosa, Luiz Cesar Ribeiro Carpinetti and Adiel Teixeira de Almeida-Filho

The purpose of this paper is to propose a supply chain risk management (SCRM) maturity model combined with a fuzzy TOPSIS classification method to evaluate and sort an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a supply chain risk management (SCRM) maturity model combined with a fuzzy TOPSIS classification method to evaluate and sort an organization into a pre-defined maturity level.

Design/methodology/approach

An axiomatic and prescriptive research method guided this study. Therefore, it proposes a prescriptive approach of maturity classification based on a theoretical SCRM maturity model combined with a multi-criteria decision technique.

Findings

The results of a pilot application indicated a consistent classification and the value of the model for diagnosing flaws and pointing directions for improving operational and disruption risk management. Its comprehensiveness allows applying it to supply chains of several industry sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model does not include all possible risks and could be revised in further developments. Also, adjustment of the maturity profiles of the multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) model requires a learning process from practical applications.

Practical implications

The adoption of the risk management maturity grid by practitioners may bring the benefit of a more objective and comprehensive evaluation of risk management processes in the supply chain context.

Social implications

An immediate social implication derives from the improvement actions that may result from the diagnosis of risk management vulnerabilities identified in the pilot application. In general, the proposed model has the potential to reduce risks, improve results and contribute to economic sustainability.

Originality/value

The maturity grid and decision model integrate overall aspects of risk management, bringing together managerial concepts to deal with a variety of supply chain operational risks. The combined multi-criteria classification procedure to sort the maturity level of an organization is also a novelty.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Archie Lockamy and Kevin McCormack

The concept of process maturity proposes that a process has a lifecycle that is assessed by the extent to which the process is explicitly defined, managed, measured and…

Downloads
15152

Abstract

The concept of process maturity proposes that a process has a lifecycle that is assessed by the extent to which the process is explicitly defined, managed, measured and controlled. A maturity model assumes that progress towards goal achievement comes in stages. The supply chain maturity model presented in this paper is based on concepts developed by researchers over the past two decades. The Software Engineering Institute has also applied the concept of process maturity to the software development process in the form of the capability maturity model. This paper examines the relationship between supply chain management process maturity and performance, and provides a supply chain management process maturity model for enhanced supply chain performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Inêz Manuele dos Santos, Caroline Maria de Miranda Mota and Luciana Hazin Alencar

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be useful in diagnosing and developing the capabilities of SC business processes (BPs) to meet SC's strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework was based on an SC strategy framework, in which a maturity model was added in order to diagnose and identify SC process capabilities that need to be developed, per maturity level, according to the type of SC strategy and the competitive strategy. A grid was proposed to analyze the relationship between them. An exploratory case study (multiple cases) was applied to verify the applicability of the model.

Findings

Findings indicate that a maturity model can delimit and align, as far as the company needs to reach, the SC strategic interests with the company's competitive objectives. However, some barriers and facilitating factors implicit can impact on this alignment. It is also noted that the maximum level of SC management (SCM) maturity may not be in the strategic interest of the company.

Originality/value

Due to the few empirical studies on the value of maturity models, this research contributes to the understanding of the usefulness of an SC process maturity model for the SC strategy. Moreover, the framework can show how a maturity model can serve as a parameter and guide to develop the capabilities of processes, resources and activities to meet the SC strategy and the reach of the competitive strategy.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Wouter Beelaerts van Blokland, Sebastiaan van de Koppel, Gabriel Lodewijks and Wouter Breen

Today, most of the car manufacturers world-wide have embraced the principles of lean manufacturing on strategic and operational level. On strategic level car companies…

Abstract

Purpose

Today, most of the car manufacturers world-wide have embraced the principles of lean manufacturing on strategic and operational level. On strategic level car companies like Toyota (Womack et al., 1990) shifted 63 per cent of the value of the car towards the first, second and third tier suppliers for the co-production and co-development of cars as an effect of lean implementation. However, lean implementation was also followed by for instance Ford and GM in the USA, the latter company faced a sudden disruption in 2009 due to the break-out of the financial crisis in 2008, while Ford survived. Could this be foreseen? The exclusive use of (classic) financial performance indicators may give a false image of a company’s current and future performance. There is a need for a model to identify “the stars and the laggards’ regarding car companies by taking into account non-financial and intangible dimensions as advocated by Neely et al. (2003) regarding the third generation of business performance measurement systems. The purpose of this paper is therefor to propose a method to measure and benchmark car company performance which includes the non-financial R&D dimension as well as supply chain, value creating and employee dimensions. These dimensions are present in the value leverage model (van Blokland et al., 2012a, 2012b) which can serve as a basis for this method. The aim is to contribute to the third generation business performance measurement systems by further development of the value leverage model towards a maturity model for benchmarking car company performance. The proposed method can provide a big picture and give insight regarding company performance and direction of the performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Value leverage can be measured by a correlation analysis regarding three dimensions, namely, supply chain, R&D and value creation, all relative to the employee or capita which results in the average value leverage (AVL) factor. This AVL factor can be used to compose a combined relative and absolute ranking. The score regarding the AVL results in a relative ranking expressing the level of stability regarding the car companies value chain and system. For the absolute ranking the car companies receive per variable parameter a score according to their absolute performance relative to the other car companies. The relative and absolute ranking are presented on the vertical and horizontal axes forming a matrix. The matrix is the basis for the stability-value leverage maturity model for measuring and benchmarking company performance. With the proposed method, the following main research question can be answered: “How can company performance be measured and benchmarked from a stability-value leverage perspective?”.

Findings

With the proposed method, stability-value leverage performance can be measured. The relative ranking on the vertical axis and the absolute ranking form together a matrix which is presented by a scatterplot. A matrix with four maturity levels emerged from the analysis by introducing the average score of all the car companies together in the data set crossing the matrix vertical and horizontal. The four levels are as follows: Level I, low stability – low value leverage; Level II, low stability – high value leverage; Level III, high stability – low value leverage; and Level IV, high stability – high value leverage. Stability-value leverage performance of car companies can be measured over time which makes it possible to observe to which direction the car company migrates for instance from Level I to Level III, before and after the financial crises in 2008. The car companies BMW, Daimler, Audi, Ford and Honda are the best performing companies in stability-value leverage over the period 2000-2014, as they are situated at Level IV. With the findings, the main research question can be answered. The value leverage indicators can be used for measuring and benchmarking company performance regarding four maturity levels of stability and value leverage. The direction of performance can be observed as well.

Research/limitations/implications

This research is limited to the car industry. Further research is devised to test the indicators for instance on the truck manufacturing industry. Further research towards new variables is part of the ongoing research.

Practical/implications

With the value leverage maturity model, it is possible to inform stakeholders about stability, value leverage and value creation capability of car companies. Weak performing companies can be identified in an early stage with this method to anticipate for instance on possible discontinuation of a car company effecting in merger an acquisition processes.

Social/implications

With the method stakeholders such as employees, users of cars and investors can be informed about how and why car companies perform in an unstable or stable manner.

Originality/value

This research towards ranking and classification of car companies aligns with theories regarding lean manufacturing and maturity models, as these models are used to compare companies on their level of perfection or excellence.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Yung-Yun Huang and Robert B Handfield

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of implementing enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and the selection of ERP vendors on supply management…

Downloads
7399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of implementing enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and the selection of ERP vendors on supply management performance for Fortune 500.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts the supply chain maturity model adopted by Gupta and Handfield (2011) and used publicly available information such as articles, research report, newspapers to develop objective maturity ratings for four key indicators – strategic sourcing, category management, and supplier relationship management.

Findings

The analysis results suggest ERP users are more mature than non-ERP users in three key indicators: strategic sourcing, category management, and supplier relationship management. Moreover, SAP ERP users are more mature than non-ERP users in strategic sourcing, category management, and supplier relationship management.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not account for the longitudinal performance of ERP systems, nor does it account for differences between organizational scope of ERP deployment, global reach, or implementation duration. The authors also did not include other measures of supply chain performance outside of the procurement area. These factors could provide further insights to supply chain performance, and will be an interesting topic for future research.

Practical implications

This study provides an extensive analysis of how the deployment of ERP systems and the selection of ERP vendors can benefit a company’s supply chain performance. This information is valuable for companies that are considering adapting an ERP system.

Originality/value

This paper uses innovative an maturity assessment rating approach with publicly available resources to measure supply management performance across different companies. This method is novel and provides valuable insights to how ERP systems and their vendors’ impact supply chain management performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000