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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Esther Ahenkorah, Ebenezer Afum, Essel Dacosta and Zhongxing Tian

This study primarily explores the influence of green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics on supply chain sustainability and economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This study primarily explores the influence of green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics on supply chain sustainability and economic performance. The study further examines the mediating role of supply chain sustainability between economic performance and green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative research approach where survey data are collected from 200 managers of manufacturing companies in Ghana. The dataset is analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling software (PLS-SEM) SmartPLS 3.

Findings

The results show that green warehousing and logistics optimization negatively influence economic performance but improves economic performance through supply chain sustainability. It is further discovered that social values and ethics have a positive influence on supply chain sustainability and economic performance.

Originality/value

This paper proposes and tests a theoretical model that explores the relationships between green warehousing, supply chain sustainability, economic performance, logistics optimization and social values and ethics through the resource dependency theory (RDT) in the manufacturing firms in Ghana.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Göran Svensson

The objective is to describe a conceptual framework and empirical illustrations of the transparency of SCM ethics in supply chains as a whole.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective is to describe a conceptual framework and empirical illustrations of the transparency of SCM ethics in supply chains as a whole.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on two Scandinavian‐based companies in the telecom and fashion clothing industries, namely: Sony Ericsson and H&M. These two companies are of interest due to their recent involvement in ethical dilemmas and ambiguities that arose on account of their links with questionable and inappropriate corporate actions and behaviour, not by the companies themselves, but by other companies within their supply chains.

Findings

Companies present in the worldwide marketplace and society, such as Sony Ericsson and H&M, do not always appear to be dedicated to ethical concerns and commitments within their supply chains as a whole. They tend to create some convenient restrictions in their statements and promises of corporate social responsibility (e.g. codes of ethics).

Research limitations/implications

The transparency of SCM ethics complements recent additions to ethics in SCM. It opens up a different aspect of the theory generation that may support further research of ethical aspects in supply chains.

Practical implications

The paper provides managerial propositions and guidelines regarding the corporate depth of ethical concerns and commitments in corporate actions and behaviour in supply chains. The framework of transparency in SCM ethics highlights those corporate actions and behaviour that may be obscured by the lack of visibility across supply chain levels. In addition, it may reveal potential weaknesses and forthcoming threats in corporate actions and behaviour in ongoing business operations.

Originality/value

One contribution is the ethical consideration in corporate actions and behaviour across different levels in supply chains. Another is that the corporate social responsibility in terms of SCM ethics should also comprise indirect business relationships. The transparency of SCM ethics opens up challenging opportunities for further research of great value to the theory generation and best practices of SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Byoung-Chun Ha and Hyunjeong Nam

The purpose of this study is to empirically analyze managers’ ethical judgments in supply chain management. It investigated the influence of those judgments on trust and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically analyze managers’ ethical judgments in supply chain management. It investigated the influence of those judgments on trust and collaboration in relationships with suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based method was applied to measure managers’ ethical judgments using a sample of 341 data sets collected via survey. Structural equation modeling was utilized to test the proposed hypotheses associating ethical judgments with trust and collaboration in supply chains.

Findings

This study illustrates that managers’ ethical judgments in bidding/contracting, information management and inventory management significantly increase trust, which in turn increases supply chain collaboration.

Originality/value

The study extends our understanding of ethical judgments in the supply chain management context. Its findings on the causality among ethical judgment, trust and supply chain collaboration provide an effective approach to the management of supplier relationships.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Philipp Bagus, Frank Daumann and Florian Follert

In response to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights from 2011, several governments are enacting laws against exploitation in global supply chains. Such a…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights from 2011, several governments are enacting laws against exploitation in global supply chains. Such a legislative proposal is problematic in several respects. The authors aim to discuss these problems from an ethical perspective to provide a theoretical basis for law-setting and management decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper studies the question based on an ethical framework with a libertarian focus.

Findings

From the perspective of a property rights-based ethics such a proposal prohibits voluntary exchanges and, thereby, a fundamental human right. From a utilitarian perspective it diminishes the utility of the parties of a potential exchange, because they cannot engage an exchange that they want to make. Moreover, it does not only shift an original state task to companies, but also tries to enforce specific values which are not shared all over the world, in third countries. In addition, it creates considerable restrictions on foreign procurement markets for domestic companies, which counteract the actual objective of the law.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides managers with a moral compass regarding their supply chain decisions based on property rights ethics and utilitarian considerations. Based on that, they can weigh the arguments and make an informed decision. The paper is limited to these approaches that are often neglected in the public debate.

Practical implications

The authors’ comprehensive discussion from the perspective of libertarian ethics can be helpful for managers in their decision-making.

Social implications

Supply chain acts have important social implications for people in developing countries as well as companies and consumers in Western countries. This study offers a comprehensive discussion from the perspective of libertarian ethics and can be helpful for entrepreneurs and managers in their decision-making.

Originality/value

The paper intends to encourage researchers from different disciplines to discuss the ethics of supply chain acts and to reflect governmental plans to transform the UN Guiding Principles in national law. It provides managers with a moral compass regarding their supply chain decisions based on property rights ethics and utilitarian considerations. Based on that, they can weigh the arguments and make an informed decision.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Göran Svensson and Hans Bååth

The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework of Supply Chain Management Ethics (SCM‐ethics).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework of Supply Chain Management Ethics (SCM‐ethics).

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based upon a qualitative approach using a series of semi‐structured interviews. Multiple perspectives and respondents have been applied in the data collection process. The study is limited to the Swedish vehicle industry.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that the corporate focus of SCM‐ethics is in part narrow in the Swedish vehicle industry. The partial focus may endanger the corporate ethical performance in the long run, while the immediate one may not be affected.

Research limitations/implications

The approach undertaken and thereof empirical limitations restrict the generality of findings. However, a structure of operationalisation of SCM‐ethics is introduced. It is based upon four orientations and nine areas of questions, all of which serve as a fundament for further research.

Practical implications

The article explores the common grounds, and provides initial insights into the complex and multifaceted field, of SCM‐ethics. It may be used for teaching, training and analytical purposes. It may also be used for further managerial exploration and replication of SCM‐ethics in business.

Originality/value

The principal contributions are a conceptual framework based upon four distinctive orientations and a set of summarized interview series in the context of SCM‐ethics, all of which may be of interest to both practitioners and scholars.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Anthony Alexander, Helen Walker and Mohamed Naim

– This study aims to aid theory building, the use of decision theory (DT) concepts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) research is examined.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to aid theory building, the use of decision theory (DT) concepts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) research is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

An abductive approach considers two DT concepts, Snowden’s Cynefin framework for sense-making and Keeney’s value-focussed decision analysis, in a systematic literature review of 160 peer-reviewed papers in English.

Findings

Around 60 per cent of the papers on decision-making in SSCM come from operational research (OR), which makes explicit use of DT. These are almost all normative and rationalist and focussed on structured decision contexts. Some exceptions seek to address unstructured decision contexts via Complex Adaptive Systems or Soft Systems Methodology. Meanwhile, a second set, around 16 per cent, comes from business ethics and are empirical, behavioural decision research. Although this set does not explicitly refer to DT, the empirical evidence here supports Keeney’s value-focussed analysis.

Research limitations/implications

There is potential for theory building in SSCM using DT, but the research only addresses SSCM research (including corporate responsibility and ethics) and not DT in SCM or wider sustainable development research.

Practical implications

Use of particular decision analysis methods for SSCM may be improved by better understanding different decision contexts.

Social implications

The research shows potential synthesis with ethical DT absent from DT and SCM research.

Originality/value

Empirical behavioural decision analysis for SSCM is considered alongside normative, rational analysis for the first time. Value-focussed DT appears useful for unstructured decision contexts found in SSCM.

Originality/value

Empirical, behavioural decision analysis for SSCM is considered alongside normative rational analysis for the first time. Value-focussed DT appears useful for unstructured decision contexts found in SSCM.

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Ravindra Baliga, Rakesh Raut and Sachin Kamble

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) that integrates the antecedents, practices and performance measures of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) that integrates the antecedents, practices and performance measures of sustainability. It also examines if lean management (LM) and supply management (SM) are antecedents of SSCM.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of literature was undertaken across multiple streams, including operations management, SCM, sustainability, business ethics and performance management. Articles relevant to SSCM published over a span of 31 years (1988–2018) were searched using keywords and specific selection criteria.

Findings

From the literature, three dependent constructs – motivators of sustainability, LM and SM – and three independent constructs – environmental practices in SCM, social practices in SCM and SSCM performance – are identified and defined. Linkages between these constructs are hypothesized to develop a theoretical framework called the “integrated lean/supply management with sustainability motivators, practices and performance model.”

Research limitations/implications

Built on the principles-practices-outcomes framework proposed earlier, this model is comprehensive in its coverage of sustainability antecedents, practices and performance. Further, it covers the SCM triad – the supplier, the focal firm and the customers – as well as the roles they play in sustainability performance.

Originality/value

By identifying LM and SM as additional antecedents of SSCM, this study suggests that sustainability may be realized through LM and SM principles. Further, the proposed model presents a novel integration of literature from diverse domains.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Elliot Simangunsong, Linda C. Hendry and Mark Stevenson

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate effective management strategies for 14 sources of supply chain uncertainty, with a particular emphasis on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate effective management strategies for 14 sources of supply chain uncertainty, with a particular emphasis on uncertainties or strategies that involve ethical issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Manufacturing strategy theory, underpinned by alignment and contingency theory, is used as the theoretical foundation. Multi-case study data are collected from 12 companies in the Indonesian food industry, including four focal manufacturers, four first-tier suppliers, and four first-tier customers (retailers).

Findings

Within the context of appropriately aligned management strategies to address 14 sources of uncertainty, three ethical issues are empirically identified: first, collusion amongst suppliers to ration supplies and increase prices; second, unethical influences on government policy; and third, “abuse” of power by large retailers at the expense of smaller competitors. Joint purchasing is argued to be a key strategy for combatting the first of these ethical issues.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the Indonesian food industry, and so further research is needed in other cultures/contexts.

Practical implications

Management strategies that aim to reduce an uncertainty at its source lead to better overall supply chain performance than strategies that merely cope with uncertainty, which only have an impact on firm-level performance.

Social implications

The ethical issues identified have implications for fair negotiations between customers and suppliers.

Originality/value

This study is unique in its in-depth case study-based empirical investigation of the management of multiple supply chain uncertainties; and in its discussion of ethical issues in this context.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Sanjana Mondal and Kaushik Samaddar

The paper aims to explore the various dimensions of human factor relevant for integrating data-driven supply chain quality management practices (DDSCQMPs) with…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the various dimensions of human factor relevant for integrating data-driven supply chain quality management practices (DDSCQMPs) with organizational performance. Keeping the transition phase from “Industry 4.0” to “Industry 5.0” in mind, the paper reinforces the role of the human factor and critically discusses the issues and challenges in the present organizational setup.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the grounded theory approach, the study arranged in-depth interviews and focus group sessions with industry experts from various service-oriented firms in India. Dimensions of human factor identified from there were grouped together through a morphological analysis (MA), and interlinkages between them were explored through a cross-consistency matrix.

Findings

This research work identified 20 critical dimensions of human factor and have grouped them under five important categories, namely, cohesive force, motivating force, regulating force, supporting force and functional force that drive quality performance in the supply chain domain.

Originality/value

In line with the requirements of the present “Industry 4.0” and the forthcoming “Industry 5.0”, where the need to collaborate human factor with smart system gets priority, the paper made a novel attempt in presenting the critical human factors and categorizing them under important driving forces. The research also contributed in linking DDSCQMPs with organizational performance. The proposed framework can guide the future researchers in expanding the theoretical constructs through initiating further cross-cultural studies across industries.

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Henry L. Petersen and Fred Lemke

– The purpose of this paper is to explore reputational risk that are borne in the supply chain and contribute to this contemporary but growing research stream.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore reputational risk that are borne in the supply chain and contribute to this contemporary but growing research stream.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a theoretical framework is provided to help in the characterisation of reputational risks and how they impact supply chain members that may be multiple tiers away from the manufacturer. Then, semi-structured interviews were conducted with practitioners who were familiar with reputational risks and who were engaging in varying mitigating techniques. Cognitive modelling was utilised to report the findings.

Findings

The practitioners in this paper were very familiar with the risks and were active in varying mitigating practices as budgets and resource constraints would allow. The brevity of the risks identified and the significance of specific risks with how they impact a reputation was revealed. Mitigation is an ongoing and haphazard process with very little information available as would be expected with a typical risk management approach.

Research limitations/implications

This paper serves to provide practitioners insight into the varying methods used by firms with supply chain members that number in hundreds. Based on our findings, a recommendation was made that utilise corporate social responsibility as a foundation that is proposed to address a number of risks including those related to price, availability and quality. The limits of this work are that it is specific to a select group of practitioners specialised in this area. Although the information is rich, it is not generalisable.

Originality/value

This paper makes a significant contribution to the literature by providing insight into the perceptions of practitioners who make decisions on mitigating reputational risks. The results suggest that this is a very new area of management that is striving to find a way to minimise their exposure.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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