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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Minelle E. Silva, Michele M.O. Pereira and Linda Caroline Hendry

This article investigates how micro-foundations of sustainability can build supply chain resilience (SCRes). Specifically, by defining supply chains as social-ecological…

Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates how micro-foundations of sustainability can build supply chain resilience (SCRes). Specifically, by defining supply chains as social-ecological systems, this article explores how sustainability as a supplier capability leads to the transformative development of SCRes capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal multi-case studies were developed over the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 52 interviews were conducted with managers and employees of 12 global supplier firms as well as associated local cooperative and consultancy managers. Secondary data were also used for triangulation. An inductive approach was used for data analysis to elaborate theory through a metaphor.

Findings

Nine micro-foundations of sustainability were identified and categorised using the dynamic capabilities steps: sensing, seizing and reconfiguring. They were found to move together with the preparing, responding and transforming steps of SCRes, respectively, and thus to perform as dance partners using our dance performance metaphor. Moreover, ten supplier cases were found to be adopting a transformative social-ecological perspective as they performed all key stages of our dance performance metaphor. The transformations all resulted from either institutional or social sustainability, and the associated micro-foundations generated six main SCRes capabilities, most commonly linking visibility and organisation with institutional and social sustainability respectively.

Practical implications

A deeper understanding of sustainability micro-foundations is provided for supply chain managers to enhance the development of SCRes strategies in preparation for future sustainability-related crises.

Originality/value

Unlike previous research, this article explores an intertwined understanding of SCRes and sustainability during a crisis. Through the micro-foundations of sustainability we explain how sustainability capability builds transformative SCRes using a supplier perspective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Hua Liu and Shaobo Wei

Building on the information processing perspective, the authors propose that both internal and external supply chain risk management (SCRM) practices play essential roles…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the information processing perspective, the authors propose that both internal and external supply chain risk management (SCRM) practices play essential roles in mediating supply chain disruption orientation (SCDO) to exercise an influence on resilience. The authors also put forward analytics capability as an important moderator in the above-mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected 170 match-paired questionnaires from Chinese firms to test our model. The authors further interviewed some managers to supplement key quantitative results.

Findings

First, SCDO positively affects resilience via internal and external SCRM practices. Second, the mediating effects of internal and external SCRM practices are stronger when analytics capability is higher. Third, analytics capability positively moderates the positive effect of SCDO on SCRM practices. Meanwhile, it does not moderate the positive effect of SCRM practices on resilience.

Research limitations/implications

Our study contributes to SCRM-related and IT-related literature by considering the content, mediating mechanisms (i.e. internal and external SCRM practices) and boundary conditions (i.e. data analytic capability) of SCDO in shaping resilience in the digital supply chain.

Practical implications

Our study helps remind managers that firms build disruption orientation, develop different SCRM practices and leverage analytics capability to improve resilience amid unexpected and unplanned disruptions.

Originality/value

Our study sheds light on the roles of both internal and external SCRM practices. Furthermore, this research helps explain how SCDO motivates resilience through SCRM practices, particularly for those firms that have higher analytics capability.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2022

Lixu Li, Yeming Gong, Zhiqiang Wang and Shan Liu

Although big data may enhance the visibility, transparency, and responsiveness of supply chains, whether it is effective for improving supply chain performance in a…

Abstract

Purpose

Although big data may enhance the visibility, transparency, and responsiveness of supply chains, whether it is effective for improving supply chain performance in a turbulent environment, especially in mitigating the impact of COVID-19, is unclear. The research question the authors addressed is: How do logistics firms improve the supply chain performance in COVID-19 through big data and supply chain integration (SCI)?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a mixed-method approach with four rounds of data collection. A three-round survey of 323 logistics firms in 26 countries in Europe, America, and Asia was first conducted. The authors then conducted in-depth interviews with 55 logistics firms.

Findings

In the first quantitative study, the authors find mediational mechanisms through which big data analytics technology capability (BDATC) and SCI influence supply chain performance. In particular, BDATC and SCI are two second-order capabilities that help firms develop three first-order capabilities (i.e. proactive capabilities, reactive capabilities, and resource reconfiguration) and eventually lead to innovation capability and disaster immunity that allow firms to survive in COVID-19 and improve supply chain performance. The results of the follow-up qualitative analysis not only confirm the inferences from the quantitative analysis but also provide complementary insights into organizational culture and the institutional environment.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to supply chain risk management by developing a three-level hierarchy of capabilities framework and finding a mechanism with the links between big data and big disaster. The authors also provide managerial implications for logistics firms to address the new management challenges posed by COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Tisha Meriam Cherian, Deepak Mathivathanan, C. Joe Arun SJ, M. Ramasubramaniam and Sreejith Alathur

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic has been severely felt by India's construction industry, which contributes heavily to economic growth and employment. An analysis of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic has been severely felt by India's construction industry, which contributes heavily to economic growth and employment. An analysis of the impact of supply chain agility, supply chain resilience and information technology capability on the construction supply chain cost and delivery performance is presented in this study in an Indian scenario post-COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of moment structures-confirmatory factor analysis-based structural equation modeling is applied to a structured questionnaire received from 220 construction companies located in Southern India.

Findings

According to the results, supply chain agility, supply chain resilience and information technology capability are essential capabilities for post-COVID-19 supply chain performance. Furthermore, these factors are observed to have a positive impact on improving cost and delivery performance in construction supply chains focused on building sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study can be used by other industries to ensure robustness and sustainability of business operations during post-COVID periods. Improving supply chain agility and information technology capabilities along with building resilience results in improving cost and delivery performance against disruptive scenarios.

Originality/value

Despite previous studies addressing the effects of COVID-19 on supply chain performance, information technology capability, agility and resilience are not addressed in construction industry research. The current study examines the simultaneous effects of resilience, agility, and information technology capability on the cost and delivery performance of Indian construction projects.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Trevor Cadden, Ronan McIvor, Guangming Cao, Raymond Treacy, Ying Yang, Manjul Gupta and George Onofrei

Increasingly, studies are reporting supply chain analytical capabilities as a key enabler of supply chain agility (SCAG) and supply chain performance (SCP). This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, studies are reporting supply chain analytical capabilities as a key enabler of supply chain agility (SCAG) and supply chain performance (SCP). This study investigates the impact of environmental dynamism and competitive pressures in a supply chain analytics setting, and how intangible supply chain analytical capabilities (ISCAC) moderate the relationship between big data characteristics (BDC's) and SCAG in support of enhanced SCP.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on the literature on big data, supply chain analytical capabilities, and dynamic capability theory to empirically develop and test a supply chain analytical capabilities model in support of SCAG and SCP. ISCAC was the moderated construct and was tested using two sub-dimensions, supply chain organisational learning and supply chain data driven culture.

Findings

The results show that whilst environmental dynamism has a significant relationship on the three key BDC's, only the volume and velocity dimensions are significant in relation to competitive pressures. Furthermore, only the velocity element of BDC's has a significant positive impact on SCAG. In terms of moderation, the supply chain organisational learning dimension of ISCAC was shown to only moderate the velocity aspect of BDC's on SCAG, whereas for the supply chain data driven culture dimension of ISCAC, only the variety aspect was shown to moderate of BDC on SCAG. SCAG had a significant impact on SCP.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing knowledge in the supply chain analytical capabilities domain by presenting a nuanced moderation model that includes external factors (environmental dynamism and competitive pressures), their relationships with BDC's and how ISCAC (namely, supply chain organisational learning and supply chain data driven culture) moderates and strengthens aspects of BDC's in support of SCAG and enhanced SCP.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Emmanuel Sawyerr and Christian Harrison

The purpose of this explorative research is to analyse the resilience of the United Kingdom's (UK) healthcare supply chains from a customer’s perspective in the light of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this explorative research is to analyse the resilience of the United Kingdom's (UK) healthcare supply chains from a customer’s perspective in the light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the capabilities of preparedness, robustness, recovery and adaptability as the foundational percept for supply chain resilience, 22 healthcare professionals in 17 of the UK's National Health Scheme (NHS) Trusts were interviewed to explore their personal and organisational approaches adopted relative to the provision of eye protection, gloves, gowns, aprons, masks and respirators. The Dynamic Capabilities View is mapped to the resilience capabilities and used to analyse the data from a transformational supply chain research perspective.

Findings

The supply chains were largely unprepared, which was not particularly surprising even though the availability of gloves was significantly better compared to the other personal protective equipment (PPE). Techniques adopted to ensure robustness and recovery revealed the use of unsanctioned methods such as extended use of PPE beyond recommended use, redefinition of guidelines, protocols and procedures by infection control and the use of expired PPE – all of which compromised customer well-being.

Research limitations/implications

As the paper views resilience through the lens of customers, it does not provide the perspectives of the supply chain practitioners as to the reasons for the findings and the challenges within these supply chains.

Practical implications

The compromise of the well-being of healthcare workers due to the vulnerabilities of healthcare supply chains is highlighted to managers and prescriptions for post-disruption adaptability are made.

Originality/value

This paper introduces transformative research to supply chain resilience research by uniquely looking at resilience from the customers' well-being perspective.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Khadija Echefaj, Abdelkabir Charkaoui, Anass Cherrafi, Anil Kumar and Sunil Luthra

The purpose of this study is to identify and prioritize capabilities and practices to ensure a resilient supply chain during an unexpected disruption. In addition, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify and prioritize capabilities and practices to ensure a resilient supply chain during an unexpected disruption. In addition, this study ranks maturity factors that influence the main capabilities identified.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conducted in three stages. First, capabilities and practices are extracted through a literature review. Second, capabilities and practices are ranked using the analytical hierarchical process method. Third, a gray technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution method is used to rank maturity factors influencing capabilities.

Findings

The findings indicate that responsiveness, readiness, flexibility and adaptability are the most important capabilities for supply chain resilience. Also, commitment and communication are the highest maturity factors influencing resilience capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide a hierarchical vision of capabilities and practices for industries to increase resilience. Limitations of the paper are related to capabilities, practices and number of experts consulted.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the importance of high-maturity practices in resilience capability adoption. The findings of this study will encourage decisions-makers to increase maturity practices to build resilience against disruption.

Originality/value

The paper reveals that developing powerful capabilities, good practices and a high level of maturity improve supply chain resilience.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Jie Zhou, Lingyu Hu, Yubing Yu, Justin Zuopeng Zhang and Leven J. Zheng

Building supply chain resilience is increasingly recognized as an effective strategy to deal with supply chain challenges, risks and disruptions. Nevertheless, it remains…

Abstract

Purpose

Building supply chain resilience is increasingly recognized as an effective strategy to deal with supply chain challenges, risks and disruptions. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how to build supply chain resilience and whether supply chain resilience could achieve a competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

By analyzing the data collected from 216 firms in China, the current study empirically examines how information technology (IT) capability and supply chain collaboration affect different forms of supply chain resilience (external resilience and internal resilience) and examines the performance implications of these two forms of supply chain resilience.

Findings

Results show that IT capability is positively related to external resilience, whereas supply chain collaboration is positively related to internal resilience. The combination of IT capability and supply chain collaboration is positively related to external resilience. In addition, internal resilience is positively related to firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study used only cross-sectional data from China for hypothesis testing. Future studies could utilise longitudinal data and research other countries/regions.

Practical implications

The findings systematically assess how IT capability and supply chain collaboration contribute to supply chain resilience and firm performance. The results provide a benchmark of supply chain resilience improvement that can be expected from IT capability and supply chain collaboration.

Originality/value

The study findings advance the understanding of supply chain resilience and provide practical implications for supply chain managers.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Ebenezer Afum, Charles Baah and Dacosta Essel

This study explores the role of external pressure, engagement capability (ENC), alliance capability (ACA), environmental sustainability commitment (ESC), and circular…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the role of external pressure, engagement capability (ENC), alliance capability (ACA), environmental sustainability commitment (ESC), and circular supply chain capability in circular economy performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a cross-sectional survey and data collected from 124 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Ghana, this study employs partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings reveal the following; first, external pressure has a significant impact on ESC. Second, ESC positively impacts ACA, ENC and circular supply chain capability. Third, ACA and ENC mediate the relationship between ESC and circular supply chain capability. Finally, circular supply chain capability has a significant impact on circular economy performance.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in testing a novel model that confirms that SMEs respond to external pressure by enhancing ESC as well as develop engagement and alliance capabilities to improve circular supply chain capability to achieve circular economy performance goals.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

Qasim Ali Nisar, Shahbaz Haider, Irfan Ameer, Muhammad Sajjad Hussain, Sonaina Safi Gill and Awan Usama

Big data analytics capabilities are the driving force and deemed as an operational excellence approach to improving the green supply chain performance in the post COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

Big data analytics capabilities are the driving force and deemed as an operational excellence approach to improving the green supply chain performance in the post COVID-19 situation. Motivated by the COVID-19 epidemic and the problems it poses to the supply chain's long-term viability, this study used dynamic capabilities theory as a foundation to assess the imperative role of big data analytics capabilities (management, talent and technological) toward green supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was quantitative and cross-sectional. Data were collected from 374 executives through a survey questionnaire method by applying an appropriate random sampling technique. The authors employed PLS-SEM to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings revealed that big data analytics capabilities play a significant role in boosting up sustainable supply chain performance. It was found that big data analytics capabilities significantly contributed to supply chain risk management and innovative green product development that ultimately enhanced innovation and learning performance. Moreover, innovation and green learning performance has a significant and positive relationship with sustainable supply chain performance. In the post COVID-19 situation, organizations can enhance their sustainable supply chain performance by giving extra attention to big data analytics capabilities and supply chain risk and innovativeness.

Originality/value

The paper specifically emphasizes on the factors that result in the sustainability in supply chain integrated with the big data analytics. Additionally, it offers the boundary condition for gaining the sustainable supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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