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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

K.L. Choy and W.B. Lee

The rapid globalization in markets for manufactured goods and the growth of information technology has led to the demand for delivering superior value to international…

Abstract

The rapid globalization in markets for manufactured goods and the growth of information technology has led to the demand for delivering superior value to international customers. Knowledge‐based systems, such as the case‐based reasoning (CBR) technique, have the potential to play a significant role in managing customer and supplier relationships under the dispersed network production systems model. The characteristic of the CBR technique in case retrieval, reuse, revision and retaining was used in solving a purchasing problem. However, there is a lack of literature in using a case‐based tool when comparing supplier bidding for the same order on a global basis. Proposes a case‐based supplier management tool (CBSMT) using the CBR technique in the areas of intelligent supplier selection and management that will enhance performance as compared to using the traditional approach. This CBSMT was first proposed as a task allocation tool, it was also used as a tool in a multi‐agent based virtual enterprise architecture. Describes an overview of the foundational issues related to CBR which provides some methodological approaches and exemplifies the current state through supplier management. Then defines a general supplier selection workflow, followed by the application of the case‐based technique to manage the problem of supplier selection. Finally, discusses an application case study of applying this supplier management tool to Honeywell Consumer Products (Hong Kong) Limited to help the selection of suppliers in their daily operations.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2020

Ayotunde Adesanya, Biao Yang, Farok Wanes Bin Iqdara and Ying Yang

The purpose of this study is to explore how tobacco manufacturing companies can improve their sustainability performance via effective supplier relationship management (SRM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how tobacco manufacturing companies can improve their sustainability performance via effective supplier relationship management (SRM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study has adopted a single case study of an international tobacco company. The primary data involved semi-structured interviews with participants from the case company who are familiar with sustainable SRM in the tobacco industry and are engaging in various techniques to improve sustainability performance.

Findings

The drivers for sustainable SRM commonly identified in literature are observable within the case company. There is also clear evidence of integrating sustainability in its SRM processes. However, the perception of sustainability as a requirement to meet stringent regulations limits its scope and drive in pursuing sustainable SRM. It has also limited supplier sustainability evaluation and performance metrics. Furthermore, the findings of this paper reinforce the importance of a procurement team’s ability to work with other functional teams in implementing sustainable SRM. The findings also contribute to the emerging literature on the impact of sustainability on supplier segmentation and multi-tier supplier management.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insight into the varying SRM methods used in the tobacco industry to ensure compliance and improve sustainability performance. However, further research is required to explore the generalisability of the findings of this study derived from a single case study.

Originality/value

The tobacco industry is an under-researched industry, particularly in terms of sustainable operations and supply chain management practices. The findings of this study seem to be relevant to those comparable industries with stringent regulations as well.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Vishal Singh Patyal, Sudhir Ambekar, Anand Prakash, Dipayan Roy and Amit Hiray

The present study proposes a model to examine the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers for establishing synergies in their processes and practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study proposes a model to examine the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers for establishing synergies in their processes and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study assessed buyers' culture through the Competing Values Framework and used Quality Management Practices Model as a proxy to assess suppliers' culture. The data from 262 paired respondents were used for this analysis. This survey was administered in India, using linear snowball-sampling technique. This study applied 3SLS regression for each culture group separately.

Findings

This study has instituted the cultural fit between the buyers' and suppliers' culture. It is observed that for getting synergies between cultures, buyers need to choose a set of suppliers which have similar cultural traits.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents empirical findings based on data from Indian manufacturing firms. These findings need testing in other developing countries and other sectors.

Practical implications

Organizations can formulate right policies for supplier selection based on the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers.

Originality/value

With increasing role of suppliers in the value chain, organizations around the world need to work with the right suppliers for gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Selection of the right suppliers depends on the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers that, in turn, depends on the selection of the right suppliers based on the prevailing culture.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2010

Chunguang Bai, Joseph Sarkis and Xiaopeng Wei

This paper aims to introduce relatively novel multi‐supply chain activity overview rough set theoretic applications to aid management decision making with an especial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce relatively novel multi‐supply chain activity overview rough set theoretic applications to aid management decision making with an especial focus on green and sustainable supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a review of recent literature with extensions around rough set or neighborhood rough set methodologies for supply chain management. An overview of how the techniques can be applied to various stages of green supply chain management, selection, evaluation, development is presented in various sections.

Findings

The paper finds that rough set methodology is flexible enough to be applied as a selection tool, performance measurement evaluation tool, and a development program evaluation tool. Its application to green supply chain management topics is warranted and valuable.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the approach provide additional avenues for further research. One major limitation of the research is that a real‐world application to validate the approaches is necessary. Extensions and integration with other tools can also provide avenues for improvement.

Practical implications

A three‐staged ecological green supplier management process may help to get a broader corporate social responsibility and general sustainability perspective on the supply chain. Management can use these tools for planning, decision making, and maintenance of green supply chain activities.

Social implications

The application of sustainability and environmental issues for supply chain management has significant social impact.

Originality/value

Methodologically, this is the first time that neighborhood rough set has been comprehensively evaluated as a tool for managing green suppliers. A comprehensive overview of the green supplier management process considering the sustainability factors helps researchers to identify many opportunities for further investigation.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

PohLean Chuah, Wai Peng Wong, T. Ramayah and M. Jantan

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier management practices are economics transactional practices and high involvement work practices (HIWP); while power asymmetry and competition intensity are considered within the organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on a multinational semiconductor company. A two‐phase statistical analysis, which comprised phase one (reliability and factor analysis), and phase two (hierarchical multiple regression analysis), was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study provides empirical evidence to support the conceptual and prescriptive statements in the literature regarding the impact of supplier management practices and the dynamics between organizational context and supplier management towards supplier performance. The results show that high involvement work practices (HIWP) mediate the impact of competition intensity on suppliers' quality performance and partially mediate the effect of competition intensity on suppliers' flexibility. The limitation of this study is that it does not use longitudinal data, which would be more useful to examine changes in variables that affect performance; nevertheless, as this study was conducted in‐house, it was able to control the extraneous factors.

Originality/value

The study provides important insights for managers to understand the disposition of the firm to better leverage organizational context by exploiting relationships with suppliers. The paper has extended organizational theory and marketing theory into a supply chain context. Moreover, it is among the first empirical work that specifically investigates the relationship between organizational context and supplier management practices; thus the paper fills an important gap in the supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Surajit Bag, Shivam Gupta and Arnesh Telukdarie

The alignment of procurement strategy with overall business strategy is important for superior firm performance. It is also essential for firms’ purchasing structure to…

Abstract

Purpose

The alignment of procurement strategy with overall business strategy is important for superior firm performance. It is also essential for firms’ purchasing structure to fit the purchasing strategy whether it is cost reduction; value analysis and/or improving delivery and increasing flexibility for achieving superior purchasing performance. The purpose of this paper is to scientifically examine the influence of organization culture (OC), green supplier development (GSD), supplier relationship management, flexibility and innovation on sustainability in supply network (SSN) under the moderation effect of institutional pressures and resources availability.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is grounded by integrating institutional theory (IT) and resource-based view (RBV) theory. The study empirically tests the conceptual model through survey data gathered from 175 respondents in the KwaZulu-Natal province of Southern Africa using structural equation modeling which is a multivariate data analysis technique that permits to simultaneously examine many relationships among manifest and latent variables.

Findings

It was found that OC plays a crucial role in shaping the workforce behavior and responsible for enhancing GSDs and building good relationship with suppliers which ultimately results into increased flexibility and innovativeness. Coercive pressures (CPs) play a moderating role between the causal relationship of innovation and SSN. Therefore, CPs have got the ability to amplify or reverse the effect between innovation and SSNs.

Research limitations/implications

The study suffers from few limitations. First, the study is restricted to one particular province in South Africa. Second, cross-sectional data were used for testing of model in the research study.

Practical implications

The findings are of great importance for both the researchers and supply chain practitioners. Supply chain practitioners may use this knowledge for benchmarking the supply network configuration process and continuously improve the process. The tested model actually shows the mechanism for enhancing SSNs. In today’s dynamic and uncertain business environment, all firms in the supply network aims to minimize risks and maximize profitability. The findings show that CPs play a moderating effect on the relationship between innovation and SSN. Whenever government authorities and institutions pressurize firms for minimizing pollution levels, we see a trend of increased innovations in the form of new product developments, usage of eco-friendly raw material and application of eco-friendly technology which ultimately minimizes the carbon footprint. Through such initiatives steel and engineering firms conform to the government norms and regulations. However, innovations are possible through collaboration with specialist suppliers and sub-suppliers by adopting a common standard across the supply network. Through this overall process of innovation, the focal firm and sub-suppliers linked in the network will benefit and ultimately achieve a competitive edge. Therefore, firms can experience multiple benefits in terms of lower development costs, lower project cycle completion time, improvement in design for re-manufacturability, low downtime, low supply risks, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and, ultimately, sustainable development.

Originality/value

The study is unique from dual perspective – both in terms of scope and contribution to supply chain management literature. First, the study integrates flexibility and innovation to study the impact on SSNs. Second, it integrates both IT and RBV theory of firm to test the moderation effect and the findings further opens up window for future research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Sudhir Ambekar, Rohit Kapoor, Anand Prakash and Vishal Singh Patyal

This paper aims to attempt to examine pressures, incentives, processes and practices used for sustainable sourcing. Further, it also proposes a framework to provide a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to attempt to examine pressures, incentives, processes and practices used for sustainable sourcing. Further, it also proposes a framework to provide a composite method for monitoring and controlling the sustainability aspects of supply management. This would enable suppliers to consider buyers’ requirements, translate these into suitable strategies, assess suppliers’ capabilities and also judge the impact of these strategies on suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study opts for literature review as a method. In total, 150 research papers in peer-reviewed English language journals were reviewed to examine the pressures, incentives, processes and practices used for sustainable sourcing.

Findings

This study attempts to answer the “why”-, “what”- and “how”-related questions about sustainable sourcing. It is observed that research in sustainable sourcing is multileveled and involves various functional departments in a firm. It is diverse and fragmented and is more concentrated on certain geographic areas, industries and methodologies.

Practical implications

This study can be helpful to both researchers and practicing managers. It provides a snapshot of the work done on sustainable sourcing, which can be used as a base for research addressing specific aspects of sustainable sourcing or for building strategies related to sustainable sourcing.

Originality/value

This study takes the present reviews available in the literature forward and provides a generic view of sustainable sourcing and proposes a composite method for monitoring and controlling the sustainability aspects of supply management. It attempts to consolidate the diverse literature presently available on sustainable sourcing.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nelson Oly Ndubisi, Muhamad Jantan, Loo Cha Hing and Mat Salleh Ayub

It is a general belief that using the right strategy for supplier selection and management will ensure the right suppliers who will adequately support the manufacturer to…

Abstract

Purpose

It is a general belief that using the right strategy for supplier selection and management will ensure the right suppliers who will adequately support the manufacturer to be flexible enough to meet customers' needs are engaged. Yet, there is little empirical evidence to support this view, especially in Malaysia. This paper attempts to fill this need by examining the impact of supplier selection and management strategies on manufacturing flexibility (such as product flexibility, launch flexibility, and volume flexibility).

Design/methodology/approach

The population for this study consists of manufacturing firms in the semi‐conductor industry in Malaysia listed in the Penang Development Corporation's directory. Questionnaire was used and each of the 120 companies listed in the sampling frame was sent a copy, out of which 100 copies were collected back. However, only 92 copies were usable. Data were analysed using the multiple regression model.

Findings

It was found that the selection of supplier based on technology is important for the manufacturer whose focus is on product and launch flexibility. However, quality becomes strategically important when the manufacturer is focusing on volume flexibility. Inventory management and technology roadmap are very important supplier management strategies with robust influence on all three forms of manufacturing flexibilities, namely product flexibility, launch flexibility, and volume flexibility. In sum, the manufacturer needs to understand clearly which flexibility of its operation is required, and then adopt a working supplier selection and management strategy.

Originality/value

This research is new and beneficial to manufacturers and suppliers in the semi‐conductor sector.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Douglas M. Lambert and Matthew A. Schwieterman

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means of achieving superior financial performance. This paper seeks to describe a macro level cross‐functional view of SRM and to provide a structure for managing business‐to‐business relationships to co‐create value and increase shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify the sub‐processes of SRM at the strategic and operational levels as well as the activities that comprise each sub‐process, focus group sessions were conducted with executives from a range of industries. The focus groups were supplemented with visits to companies identified in the focus groups as having the most advanced SRM practices.

Findings

The research resulted in a framework that managers can use to implement a cross‐functional, cross‐firm, SRM process in business‐to‐business relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on focus groups with executives in 15 companies representing nine industries and multiple positions in the supply chain, including retailers, distributors, manufacturers and suppliers. While all companies had global operations, only one was based outside of the USA. Nevertheless, the framework has been presented in executive seminars in North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia with very positive feedback.

Practical implications

The framework can be used by managers and has been successfully implemented in large corporations. The view of SRM presented involves all business functions, which extends the current thinking.

Originality/value

The framework includes all business functions and was developed with input from executives representing major corporations with global operations.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Harald Biong and Ragnhild Silkoset

Employees often expect an emphasis on financial aspects to be predominant when their employers choose a fund management company for the investment of employees’ pension…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees often expect an emphasis on financial aspects to be predominant when their employers choose a fund management company for the investment of employees’ pension fund deposits. By contrast, in an attempt to appear as socially responsible company managers may emphasize social responsibility (SR) in pension fund choices. The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent managers for small- and medium-sized companies emphasize SR vs expected returns when choosing investment managers for their employees’ pension funds.

Design/methodology/approach

A conjoint experiment among 276 Norwegian SMEs’ decision makers examines their trade-offs between social and financial goals in their choice of employees’ pension management. Furthermore, the study examines how the companies’ decision makers’ characteristics influence their pension fund management choices.

Findings

The findings show that the employers placed the greatest weight to suppliers providing funds adhering to socially responsible investment (SRI) practices, followed by the suppliers’ corporate brand credibility, the funds’ expected return, and the suppliersmanagement fees. Second, employers with investment expertise emphasized expected returns and downplayed SR in their choice, whereas employers with stated CSR-strategies downplayed expected return and emphasized SR.

Originality/value

Choice of supplier to manage employees’ pension funds relates to a general discussion on whether companies should do well – maximizing value, or do good, – maximizing corporate SR. In this study, doing well means maximizing expected returns and minimizing costs of the pension investments, whereas doing good means emphasizing SRI in this choice. Unfortunately, the employees might pay a price for their companies’ ethicality as moral considerations may conflict with maximizing the employees’ pension fund value.

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