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Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Umar Iqbal Siddiqi, Jin Sun and Naeem Akhtar

The study aims to examine the effects of ulterior motives in peer and expert supplementary online hotel reviews on consumers' perceived deception, dissatisfaction, and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the effects of ulterior motives in peer and expert supplementary online hotel reviews on consumers' perceived deception, dissatisfaction, and its downstream effects on altruistic response and repurchase intentions. The research also examines the moderating role of hotel attribute performance on perceived deception and its consequents.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used convenient non-probability sampling and collected data from 448 inbound tourists in China. It used partial least square structural equation modeling technique and SmartPLS 3.0 for analyzing the main and moderating effects of the variables.

Findings

The ulterior motives in peer and expert supplementary reviews significantly affect perceived deception, further leading to consumers' dissatisfaction and engagement in altruistic response. Noticeably, consumers' dissatisfaction is positively associated with repeat purchase intentions. Hotel attribute performance significantly moderates the relationship between the ulterior motives in supplementary reviews and consumers' perceived deception.

Originality/value

The study examines the key issue in online hotel reviews using the expectancy disconfirmation theory and identifies consumers' altruistic behavior because of their dissatisfaction, contributing to ethics and consumer behavior literature. Moreover, the research offers prolific implications for hotel and travel websites and hoteliers in the study context.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Ángel Borrego and Francesc Garcia

This study seeks to analyse the policies of library and information science (LIS) journals regarding the publication of supplementary materials, the number of journals and…

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621

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to analyse the policies of library and information science (LIS) journals regarding the publication of supplementary materials, the number of journals and articles that include this feature, the kind of supplementary materials published with regard to their function in the article, the formats employed and the access provided to readers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analysed the instructions for authors of LIS journals indexed in the ISI Journal Citation Reports, as well as the supplementary materials attached to the articles published in their 2011 online volumes.

Findings

Large publishers are more likely to have a policy regarding the publication of supplementary materials, and policies are usually homogeneous across all the journals of a given publisher. Most policies state the acceptance of supplementary materials, and even journals without a policy also publish supplementary materials. The majority of supplementary materials provided in LIS articles are extended methodological explanations and additional results in the form of textual information in PDF or Word files. Some toll-access journals provide open access to any reader to these files.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the characteristics of supplementary materials in LIS journals. The results may be used by journal publishers to establish a policy on the publication of supplementary materials and, more broadly, to develop data sharing initiatives in academic settings.

Details

Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2009

Daniel Mulino, Richard Scheelings, Robert Brooks and Robert Faff

An aspect of prospect theory posits that decision‐makers, when making decisions in the face of risk, make their decisions with respect to a pre‐existing reference point or…

Abstract

An aspect of prospect theory posits that decision‐makers, when making decisions in the face of risk, make their decisions with respect to a pre‐existing reference point or ‘frame’ (the statusquo bias). We utilize data from the Australian version of the TV game show, Deal or No Deal, to explore whether risk aversion varies with a change in reference point in a context where stakes are real and high.We achieve this by exploiting a special and unique Australian feature of the Deal or No Deal lottery‐choice setting, namely, the existence of the Chance or the SuperCase rounds (supplementary rounds). These rounds reverse the decision‐frame that was obtained in earlier (normal) rounds. We fit and estimate a complete dynamic decision‐making model to our dataset and find that the risk aversion estimate of contestants who participated in both the normal and the supplementary rounds indeed differs depending on the nature of the round, a result consistent with the operation of the existence of a framing effect.

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Review of Behavioural Finance, vol. 1 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Naeem Akhtar, Umar Iqbal Siddiqi, Muhammad Nadeem Akhtar, Muhammad Usman and Wasim Ahmad

This study aims to offer a conceptual framework that elaborates on how tourists’ perception of contradictory features in reviews’ factuality and comprehension – within a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer a conceptual framework that elaborates on how tourists’ perception of contradictory features in reviews’ factuality and comprehension – within a single hotel review and across multiple hotel reviews – trigger attitude ambivalence and psychological discomfort, which determine their behaviors – choice deferral and hotel booking intentions. It also investigates the moderating role of anticipated conflicting reactions (ACRs) through contradictory features on consumers’ attitude ambivalence.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a Chinese setting, researchers collected data from 524 inbound tourists who were the consumers of hotels in Beijing. The study used IBM Amos 23.0 to test measurement and structural models for the proposed relationships. It also used PROCESS macro 3.4 for the moderation analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal a positive association between contradictory features in reviews and the resulting ambivalence that affects consumers’ discomfort and leads to the decision to defer the choice of hotel. Conversely, consumers’ discomfort has a positive impact on the hotel booking intentions. ACRs have positive moderating effects on the associations between contradictory features and consumers’ attitude ambivalence.

Originality/value

By investigating the contradictory features in hotel reviews, this study extends the body of research on dual information processing (i.e. the heuristic–systematic model) and the literature on service management, psychological behaviors, travel intermediaries and hotel firms. Future research directions are recommended for tourism and hospitality researchers.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Qian Wang and Eric W.T. Ngai

This study aims to provide an objective analysis of the state-of-the-art and intellectual development of publications related to event study methodology in business research.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide an objective analysis of the state-of-the-art and intellectual development of publications related to event study methodology in business research.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 1,219 papers related to event study methodology, covering all business disciplines and spanning 34 years from 1983 to 2016.

Findings

Through three stages of primary analysis, namely, initial sample, citation and co-citation analyses, the authors identified the publication trends, supplementary techniques, influential publications and intellectual clusters in the area of event study methodology in business.

Research limitations/implications

The findings serve as a benchmark for the extensive literature related to event study methodology in business and may facilitate the transference of the amassed useful techniques among disciplines and the identification of future research directions.

Originality/value

The current study represents as a pioneering effort to review event study-related publications using bibliometric analysis.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Rajshekhar G. (Raj) Javalgi, Bob D. Cutler and William A. Winans

The objective of this paper is to examine the country of origin (COO) research as it applies to services. This stream of research has seemed to focus on products since the…

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3722

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to examine the country of origin (COO) research as it applies to services. This stream of research has seemed to focus on products since the 1960s, but has been applied to services in only a very few areas. This dearth of research is surprising as trade in international services has increased greatly in recent years and continues to grow. This study thoroughly examines the related journal articles and attempts to answer the question: “Does COO research apply to services?” Our investigation found three classes of literature focusing on services, and details the studies in each. The study concludes with recommendations for future research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Bong Hwan Kim

This paper presents the details, circumstances and issues relating to Korea's budgetary responses to COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the details, circumstances and issues relating to Korea's budgetary responses to COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The author analyzes the details and consequences of budget responses to COVID-19 of Korea.

Findings

Korea has implemented two supplementary budgets, worth 50 tn KRW, which were approved by the National Parliament within an average of 13 days. This was an exceptionally quick approval by the Parliament. While these prompt actions help the government provide necessary measures to combat the pandemic, hasty decisions may have long-term consequences on fiscal soundness. Effective handling of COVID-19 in Korea increased the approval rating for the current administration.

Originality/value

This is consistent with the argument by Bartels (2013) who states that ordinary citizens assess politicians and policies primarily on the basis of visible evidence of success or failure. Because evaluations on government projects other than handling crisis is out of people's interests during pandemic, inefficient projects tend to be maintained. For future, it is desirable to have a fiscal rule beforehand to address a crisis.

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Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Gerard Stone and Lee D. Parker

This paper aims to examine and critique the accounting literature's dominant readability formula, the Flesch formula. Furthermore, the paper sets out to propose refinement…

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1030

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and critique the accounting literature's dominant readability formula, the Flesch formula. Furthermore, the paper sets out to propose refinement and augmentation to the formula with a view to expanding its applicability and relevance to researchers' attempts at better understanding and critiquing the effectiveness of accounting communications. This aim extends to setting a more robust foundation for informing policymakers' and practitioners' interest in implementing more effective communications with their target stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers an historically informed methodological critique of the current articulation and application of the Flesch formula, both generally and in accounting research. This critique forms the basis for developing proposed revisions and supplementary measures to augment Flesch's coverage. These are presented with sample empirics.

Findings

Illustrative examples suggest that it is feasible and desirable to apply a revised formula that reduces Flesch's misplaced emphasis on word length by respecifying its sentence length variable, a probable cause of low readability. A reader attribute score further enhances the formula by integrating the considerable impact of readers' attributes on readability and accounting communication effectiveness. Supplementary measures, comprising non‐narrative communications dimensions, are introduced as a foundation for further research.

Originality/value

The paper provides not only critique but also refinement and augmentation of the much used Flesch readability formula for accounting communications research. It offers a first stage approach to encompassing potentially important communication elements such as readers' attributes, tables, graphs and headings, to date critiqued as potentially important but left unattended by accounting researchers. This offers the prospect of extending Flesch's application to contemporary accounting communications issues and questions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Naeem Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem Akhtar, Umar Iqbal Siddiqi, Muhammad Riaz and Weiqing Zhuang

The present study develops a conceptual model that shows how the manipulation attributes of word choice, sentence fluency, convention of meaning, and organization of…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study develops a conceptual model that shows how the manipulation attributes of word choice, sentence fluency, convention of meaning, and organization of sentence structure in online hotel reviews are connected to linguistic errors, such as spelling and grammar and argument errors, how such errors intensify the likelihood that messages will be misunderstood, and how these misunderstandings affect customers' responses.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was employed to collect data from 591 inbound tourists in Beijing, China. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS 25.0 and Amos Graphics 23.0. Descriptive analysis was performed to explain the sociodemographic characteristic of respondents. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Results demonstrate that manipulation attributes increase linguistic errors, and two linguistic errors have profound positive effects on customers' understanding of meaning, which influence their responses in the form of negative online ratings and low purchase intentions.

Originality/value

The study's findings contribute to the literature on hospitality, linguistics, and consumer behavior, and have managerial implications for online review websites, online travel agents, and hotel management. Research limitations lead to suggestions for future research for hospitality scholars.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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