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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Unnikammu Moideenkutty and Stuart Schmidt

The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationship among liking, social exchange and supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationship among liking, social exchange and supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Employees and their supervisors were surveyed to obtain data from 202 subordinates and 33 supervisors.

Findings

Results indicated that liking is positively related to social exchange and supervisor-directed OCB. Contrary to expectations, social exchange did not partially mediate the relationship between liking and citizenship.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that it was correlational. The lack of support for mediating effect of social exchange suggests the need for further research with data collected from different sources.

Practical implications

Liking has positive effects on both social exchange relationship and supervisor-directed OCB. Trust is an important element of social exchange. Liking may be an independent source of influence on supervisor-directed OCB.

Social implications

Liking, an affective variable, may be an important influence in organizational behavior. It represents positive organizational behavior which is currently generating significant scholarly attention.

Originality/value

This study was conducted in the Sultanate of Oman, an Arabian Gulf country. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first such study done in the region. In this study, the authors include trust as a representative of the quality of relationship between supervisor and subordinates. Unlike leader–member exchange (LMX), trust has rarely been related to liking in previous studies. Study tests for social exchange (including supervisory trust) as a mediator of the relationship between liking and supervisor-directed OCB.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Fenika Wulani, Tarsisius Hani Handoko and Bernardinus Maria Purwanto

This study investigates the effect of supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on leader–member exchange (LMX), the moderating role of impression…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the effect of supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on leader–member exchange (LMX), the moderating role of impression management motives on this relationship, the effect of LMX on organizational and interpersonal deviance and the mediating effect of LMX on the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and deviant behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey questionnaire to collect data. Respondents were 342 nonmanagerial employees working in Surabaya Raya, Indonesia. Hypothesis testing is done using Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results show that supervisor-directed OCB is positively related to LMX, and LMX is negatively related to organizational deviance but not significantly related to interpersonal deviance. The study also finds that impression management motives moderate the positive relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and LMX. Furthermore, LMX mediates the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and organizational deviance, but not interpersonal deviance.

Practical implications

This study suggests the importance of human resource management (HRM) activities and managers being aware of subordinate OCB motives and the impact of LMX on interpersonal and organizational deviance, as well as what supervisors need to do to reduce these negative effects.

Originality/value

Few studies examined the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and workplace deviance behaviors (WDBs). This study provides a mechanism of their relationship by considering LMX as a mediator. Also, heretofore the existing studies tend to focus more on LMX as an antecedent of OCB. This study provides an understanding of OCB as an antecedent of LMX with the moderating effect of impression management motives.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Alexandre J.S. Morin, Christian Vandenberghe, Jean‐Sébastien Boudrias, Isabelle Madore, Julien Morizot and Michel Tremblay

This paper seeks to examine the relationships between affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) across four foci: organizations, supervisors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the relationships between affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) across four foci: organizations, supervisors, coworkers, and customers. Further, it aims to determine whether relationships among commitments and OCBs involve mediated linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on matched employee‐supervisor data (n=216). The relative fit of different models representing relationships among commitments and OCBs was examined using structural equations modeling.

Findings

Results revealed that commitments to coworkers, customers and supervisors displayed positive relationships with OCBs directed at parallel foci. In addition, commitment to the global organization partially and negatively mediated the relationship of commitments to coworkers and customers to parallel OCBs dimensions. Results also revealed cross‐foci relationships between local commitments and OCBs. Finally, no commitment target was significantly associated with organization‐directed OCBs but the latter were positively related to local OCBs.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that multiple commitments and OCBs are involved in a complex net of relationships among which local foci play a critical, and positive, role.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Ali Ahmad Bodla, Ningyu Tang, Rolf Van Dick and Usman Riaz Mir

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between authoritarian leadership, organizational citizenship behavior toward one’s supervisor (OCBS) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between authoritarian leadership, organizational citizenship behavior toward one’s supervisor (OCBS) and organizational deviance. The authors hypothesized curvilinear relationships between authoritarian leadership and OCBS, and between authoritarian leadership and organizational deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed two-source survey data of 240 employee–supervisor dyads collected from seven organizations in Pakistan.

Findings

Employees exhibited most OCBS and least organizational deviance at intermediate levels of authoritarian leadership. Employees’ perception of a benevolent climate at work moderated the curvilinear relations.

Research limitations/implications

The authors cannot draw causal inferences because of cross-sectional data. Furthermore, the authors’ results may be limited to cultures with high collectivism and high power distance.

Practical implications

This study envisions and illuminates a new avenue of curvilinear relationships among authoritarian leadership, OCBS and organizational deviance.

Originality/value

The two sources (employee–supervisor dyads) data collected from seven organizations supported a unique curvilinear relationship between authoritarian leadership, OCBS and organizational deviance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Ghulam Ali Arain, Zeeshan Ahmed Bhatti, Imran Hameed and Yu-Hui Fang

This paper aims to examine the consequences for innovative work behavior (IWB) of top-down knowledge hiding – that is, supervisors’ knowledge hiding from supervisees…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the consequences for innovative work behavior (IWB) of top-down knowledge hiding – that is, supervisors’ knowledge hiding from supervisees (SKHS). Drawing on social learning theory, the authors test the three-way moderated-mediation model in which the direct effect of SKHS on IWB is first mediated by self-efficacy and then further moderated by supervisor and supervisee nationality (locals versus foreigners).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected multi-sourced data from 446 matched supervisor-supervisee pairs working in a diverse range of organizations operating in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After initial data screening, confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to test for the factorial validity of the used measures with AMOS. The hypothesized relationships were tested in regression analysis with SPSS.

Findings

Results showed that SKHS had both direct and mediation effects, via the self-efficacy mediator, on supervisee IWB. The mediation effect was further moderated by supervisor and supervisee nationality (local versus foreigners), which highlighted that the effect was stronger for supervisor–supervisee pairs that were local-local or foreigner-foreigner than for pairs that were local-foreigner or foreigner-local.

Originality/value

This study contributes to both knowledge hiding and IWB literature and discusses the useful theoretical and practical implications of the findings.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Ying‐Wen Liang

The purpose of this research is to identify that both work values and burnout are important predictors for promoting organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). Moreover…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify that both work values and burnout are important predictors for promoting organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). Moreover, this research also seeks to investigate the moderating impact of burnout on the relationships between work values and OCBs.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 310 employee‐supervisor dyads of hotel front‐line service employees in Taiwan were selected as the research participants. The employees were asked to provide information on the items about work values and burnout, and their supervisors were asked to complete items concerning the OCBs of their subordinates. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to investigate measurement reliability and validity. All hypothesized relationships and moderating effects were tested using hierarchical regression equations.

Findings

It was found that both work values and burnout are important factors to consider for promoting OCBs. In addition, the study also proves that burnout as a moderator can decrease the predictions of the relationship between work values and OCBs.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the context culture and data collection process.

Practical implications

This research argues that an employee having higher work values may extend his/her upward striving from in‐role behavior to extra‐role behavior. However, a diminished sense of personal accomplishment signifies that this job may no longer offer a personal interest to the point that an employee is unwilling to display OCBs.

Originality/value

Findings of the present study suggest that not only both work values and burnout are important factors in influencing OCBs, but also their interaction effect is a key factor in influencing OCBs.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jaclyn M. Nowakowski and Donald E. Conlon

We provide a brief review of how the concept of justice has evolved over time from a single construct (distributive justice) to one represented by four constructs…

Abstract

We provide a brief review of how the concept of justice has evolved over time from a single construct (distributive justice) to one represented by four constructs (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice). We then compare and contrast two recent meta‐analytic views of organizational justice, focusing on the relationships each documents between justice constructs and organizational outcomes. We conclude by arguing that the justice literature needs to focus on identifying moderators of the justice‐outcome relations noted in the meta‐analyses.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Erich C. Fein, Aharon Tziner, Liat Lusky and Ortal Palachy

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical climate and organizational justice perceptions on the quality of manager‐employee relationships via…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical climate and organizational justice perceptions on the quality of manager‐employee relationships via leader‐member exchange (LMX). It also aims to explore differences between distributive justice, procedural justice, and interactional justice perceptions as related to LMX. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relative strength of connections between ethical climate, these three types of justice perceptions, and LMX.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted via survey administration of questionnaires. The sample consisted of 105 working adults in an Israeli telecommunications company.

Findings

It was found that there was a significant positive relationship between perceived interactional justice and levels of LMX. No significant relationships were present between LMX and the other types of justice perceptions. Furthermore, it was discovered that there was a significant positive relationship between ethical climate and LMX. As an important, unexpected finding the study discovered a significant negative relationship between ethical climate and procedural justice.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to examine the effects of justice perceptions together with ethical climate perceptions on LMX. As such, these findings offer guidance in the development and implementation of further studies to examine the linkages between these constructs. In particular, it suggests that these findings provide a framework for examining the potential moderating role of ethical climate in the relationship between interactional justice perceptions and LMX.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Paul W. Thurston and Laurel McNall

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying structure of employees' justice perceptions in the context of their organizations' performance appraisal practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying structure of employees' justice perceptions in the context of their organizations' performance appraisal practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten multi‐item scales were designed to measure the perceived fairness of performance appraisal practices. A nested confirmatory factor analysis of employee responses (n=188) compared the four justice dimensions (i.e. procedural, distributive, interpersonal, informational) to five plausible alternatives. Construct validity was demonstrated through a structural equation model of matched employee and supervisor responses (n=117).

Findings

The confirmatory factor analysis showed evidence of four distinct but highly correlated justice constructs. Results supported hypothesized relationships between procedural justice and helpful behaviors toward the organization via appraisal system satisfaction; distributive justice with appraisal satisfaction; and interpersonal and informational justice and helpful behaviors toward the supervisor via supervisor satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study underscores the importance of fostering perceptions of justice in the context of performance appraisal. The scales developed in this study could be used to isolate potential problems with an organization's performance appraisal practices. Originality/value – The paper integrates prior research concerning the positive effects of procedural, distributive, interpersonal, and informational justice on affective and behavioral responses towards performance appraisals.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Dan S. Chiaburu and Sophia V. Marinova

To investigate the antecedents and contingencies of employee role enlargement.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the antecedents and contingencies of employee role enlargement.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analysis on data obtained by surveying 186 line and administrative employees.

Findings

Results indicate that leader‐ and organization‐directed trust are positively related to employees' role enlargement toward individual‐ and organization‐directed citizenship behaviors (OCBOs). In addition, organizational justice moderated the above direct relationships. Specifically, interpersonal justice moderated the relationship between leader‐directed trust and role enlargement toward individual‐directed citizenship behaviors. Furthermore, procedural justice and distributive justice moderated the relationship between organization‐directed trust and role enlargement toward OCBOs, respectively.

Practical implications

Practitioners interested in interventions to enlarge the role perception of their employees can use organizational development interventions beyond the enhancement of social exchange factors such as leader‐ and organization‐directed trust. Depending on the desired individual or organizational focus of role enlargement, proper care should be given to fairness‐related components such as interpersonal, distributive and procedural justice.

Originality/value

The findings are valuable for those engaged in theory building and testing and for practitioners. From a theoretical perspective, the paper provides support for the interaction between trust and organizational justice and their impact on role enlargement. Practitioners can use these ideas to design organizational development interventions.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33