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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Rui Jiang and Xinqi Lin

Moral leadership is a common leadership style in Chinese society and is of great significance to Chinese organizations. Unethical employee behavior also widely exists in…

Abstract

Purpose

Moral leadership is a common leadership style in Chinese society and is of great significance to Chinese organizations. Unethical employee behavior also widely exists in all kinds of social organizations and brings great harm. The research on the relationship between moral leadership and unethical employee behavior has not been involved yet, but it is important. This paper studies how moral manager (senior leader) leadership trickles down to unethical employee behavior through moral supervisor (employee direct supervisor) leadership, and discusses the moderating effect of LMX and ethical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the questionnaire survey of 406 pairs of leaders and employees, and use multilevel path analysis, we test the hypothesis in this paper.

Findings

The research results show that (1) Moral manager leadership is negatively related to unethical employee behavior. (2) Moral supervisor leadership mediates the relationship between moral manager leadership and unethical employee behavior. (3) LMX positively moderates the relationship between moral manager leadership and moral supervisor leadership, and moderates the mediating effect of moral supervisor leadership. (4) Ethical climate positively moderates the relationship between moral supervisor leadership and unethical employee behavior, and moderates the mediating effect of moral supervisor leadership.

Originality/value

First, this study further proves that moral leadership is a popular positive leadership among the three dimensions of paternalistic leadership that extends its influence to unethical employee behavior. Second, this study traces the source of the moral leadership of employees' supervisors and reveals the action mechanism of how moral manager leadership affects unethical employee behavior. Finally, LMX provides the organizational context of the trickle-down effect and the occurrence of unethical employee behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2016

Cynthia L. Gramm and John F. Schnell

We investigate the effects of management-employee similarity on mistreated employees’ propensities to engage in legal and organizational claiming, to quit, and to not seek…

Abstract

Purpose

We investigate the effects of management-employee similarity on mistreated employees’ propensities to engage in legal and organizational claiming, to quit, and to not seek a remedy in ongoing employment relationships.

Methodology/approach

We test hypotheses generated by the similarity-attraction and similarity-betrayal paradigms using Tobit regression and data from vignette-based employee surveys.

Findings

Mistreated employees with same-sex supervisors are more likely to initiate legal claims and to quit than those with opposite-sex supervisors, but less likely to initiate legal claims and to quit when they have a same-race supervisor than when they have a different-race supervisor. The effects of management-employee similarity on mistreated employees’ remedy-seeking responses exhibit asymmetries by gender and by race. The presence of same-race supervisors or other managers appears to diminish the greater reluctance of nonwhite employees, compared to white employees, to use organizational claiming mechanisms.

Originality/value

We know of no prior published research that has investigated the determinants of employees’ propensities to engage in multiple forms of remedy seeking, as well as the propensity to not seek a remedy, in response to plausibly illegal mistreatment not involving dismissal.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Arash Mashhady

Supervisors play an important role in the implementation of organizational policies and practices. This study aims to examine the role of supervisors as both recipients…

Abstract

Purpose

Supervisors play an important role in the implementation of organizational policies and practices. This study aims to examine the role of supervisors as both recipients and main implementers of organizational change by investigating how supervisors’ relationship with organization would affect their attitude toward change (ATC) and how employeessupervisor relationship, as perceived by employees, would influence their reaction to change.

Design/methodology/approach

The influence of participation, perceived organizational support (POS) and mutual expectation clarity (MEC) on supervisors’ ATC was examined, along with the influence of leader–member exchange, perception of supervisor’s expressed ATC and also supervisors’ organizational status on employees’ ATC. Two studies were conducted in a chain hospital in India.

Findings

The findings suggest that supervisors’ ATC improved by higher participation, POS and MEC. Also, while employees’ change attitude was predicted by how they perceived their supervisors’ status, expressed reaction toward change and perception of employeesupervisor relationship, for employees who either perceived highly negative change attitude of their supervisors or believed that their supervisors had low organizational status, the employeesupervisor relationship had almost no effect on improving employees’ attitude.

Originality/value

Considering that supervisors often tend to engage in professional relationships with their subordinate employees, little is investigated on how, through the lens of relationships, supervisors may affect employees’ ATC. This paper attempts to make a difference by conducting two connected studies in a chain hospital to examine how supervisors – as recipients and implementers of organizational policies and practices – could influence employees’ ATC. The findings suggest managerial implications that could inform practitioners toward improvement of employee buy-ins for change programs.

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Jiang Rui and Lin Xinqi

Conducting research on the relationship between benevolent leadership and unethical employee behavior can help us find solutions to reduce unethical employee behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

Conducting research on the relationship between benevolent leadership and unethical employee behavior can help us find solutions to reduce unethical employee behavior. This paper also discusses how the benevolent manager leadership can be transmitted to the employee's unethical behavior through the benevolent supervisor leadership and the moderating effect of LMX and ethical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a questionnaire survey of 406 pairs of leaders, supervisor and employees, the authors use data aggregation test, confirmatory factor analysis, descriptive statistics and multilevel model (HLM) to test our hypothesis.

Findings

(1) Manager supervisor leadership is negatively related to unethical employee behavior, (2) benevolent supervisor leadership mediates the relationship between benevolent manager leadership and unethical employee behavior, (3) LMX positively moderates the relationship between benevolent manager leadership and benevolent supervisor leadership and moderates the mediating effect of benevolent supervisor leadership, and (4) ethical climate positively moderates the relationship between benevolent supervisor leadership and unethical employee behavior and moderates the mediating effect of benevolent supervisor leadership.

Originality/value

First, based on previous studies, this study further proves that benevolent leadership is a popular positive leadership among the three dimensions of paternalistic leadership that extends its influence to unethical employee behavior. Second, the study traces the source of the benevolent leadership of employees' supervisors and reveals the action mechanism of how benevolent manager leadership affects unethical employee behavior (trickle-down effect). LMX and the ethical climate provide the organizational context of the trickle-down effect and the occurrence of unethical employee behavior.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Aysin Pasamehmetoglu, Priyanko Guchait, J.B. Tracey, Christopher J.L. Cunningham and Puiwa Lei

The purpose of this paper is to amend and extend the emerging research that has utilized an employee-focused approach to examining the service recovery process. In doing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to amend and extend the emerging research that has utilized an employee-focused approach to examining the service recovery process. In doing so, the authors examine the influences of supervisor and coworker support for error management on two measures of employee service performance: service recovery performance and helping behaviors during service failure and recoveries. Specifically, this study examines the linear and non-linear interaction effects of supervisor and coworker support for error management on the outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the proposed relationships, the authors conducted a field study that utilized survey data from a sample of 243 restaurant employees and their immediate supervisors. Employee ratings of supervisor and coworker support for error management were matched with the data gathered for the two dependent variables (i.e. supervisory ratings of service recovery performance and helping behaviors). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the linear interaction effects on the outcome variables. To examine the non-linear interaction effects on the outcome variables the authors utilized polynomial regression and response surface modeling.

Findings

The results showed that the interaction effects of supervisor and coworker support for error management was significantly positively related to both service recovery performance and helping behaviors. In addition, an alternative analysis of the shape of the interaction effects using polynomial regression and response surface modeling showed that the moderating effects may be better conceptualized as non-linear.

Originality/value

These findings offer new insights about the roles and impact of various forms of support in the service recovery process. First, the current study focuses specifically on supervisor and coworker support for error management and the impact on employees’ service recovery performance and helping behaviors. Second, this research investigates the interaction effects of these two forms of support on service recovery performance and helping behaviors. Third, along with linear interaction effects, the current work examines non-linear interaction effects. These relationships examined in this study have not been tested before. Thus, the findings of this research make a unique contribution to research in service management. The findings of this study provide more prescriptive insights about the means to prevent and respond effectively to service errors.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Ghada El‐Kot and Mike Leat

The aim of this paper is to explore the supervision facets from the employees' perception in Egypt. Another aim is to explore the relationships between the supervisors'…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the supervision facets from the employees' perception in Egypt. Another aim is to explore the relationships between the supervisors' facets and their satisfaction level.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the aims of this research, the researchers collected data from different employees in deterrent organizations in Egypt (n=272). Validity and reliability tests were computed for the measures used in the research. Descriptive statistics, inter‐correlations were computed for the variables used in this research to test the research hypothesis.

Findings

The similarities with the non‐western contest were found in some facets of supervisors, while others are not. Significant relationships were found between supervisors' facets and employees' satisfaction from their supervisors.

Practical implications

Some practical conclusions which would lead to effective and successful organizations in the Egyptian context are: creating a positive environment by focusing on the social relationships between employees and their supervisors and developing a clear job description to help employees understand what they have to do, along with allowing some real participation by the employees in making decisions.

Originality/value

Investigating such concepts will provide the basic information needed to develop a clear understanding for supervisory‐employees relationships in a non‐Western context, which is not available currently.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Peter BeomCheol Kim and Kevin D. Carlson

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether agreement between frontline employee self-ratings and supervisory ratings of service performance functions as an indicator…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether agreement between frontline employee self-ratings and supervisory ratings of service performance functions as an indicator of healthy supervisor-subordination relationships above and beyond what might be indicated simply by either supervisory ratings or self-ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses were tested using a sample of 220 matched pairs of frontline service workers and their immediate supervisors from nine full service hotels in the USA.

Findings

The results show that higher levels of agreement in service performance ratings between employees and supervisors is associated with higher levels of leader-member exchange (LMX) and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

Senior managers can refer to the level of performance rating agreement between customer service employees and their supervisors in assessing supervisors’ competency to manage their work relationship with their subordinates.

Originality/value

This study examined rating agreement in a service performance context and found rating agreement between subordinates and their supervisor may have a unique effect on service worker effectiveness, producing a unique incremental effect on LMX and organizational commitment. This is important given that few attempts have been made to examine service performance from both subordinates’ and supervisors’ perspectives and the implication that rating agreement may have for improving employee service performance.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Rhonda S. Klieman, Julie A. Quinn and Karen L. Harris

Examines the merits of job breadth as a construct reflecting discretionary work behavior, and the influence that a supervisor is likely to have on an employee’s developing…

Abstract

Examines the merits of job breadth as a construct reflecting discretionary work behavior, and the influence that a supervisor is likely to have on an employee’s developing job breadth. Surveys were completed by employees from long‐term care facilities in the mid‐western USA. Results indicated that job breadth was most strongly, and positively, related to the quality of employeesupervisor relationship. Further, evidence suggested that a worker and supervisor do not necessarily perceive the boundaries of a job in an identical manner.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Pedro Neves and Robert Eisenberger

The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of perceived organizational support (POS) for employee risk-taking through its association with greater trust among…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of perceived organizational support (POS) for employee risk-taking through its association with greater trust among supervisors and subordinates that the organization will take into account the individual's intent to be helpful in the case of failure (failure-related trust).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 346 employee-supervisor dyads from diverse organizations. Employees and supervisors described their POS and failure-related trust. Supervisors also rated employee's risk-taking behaviors.

Findings

Perceived organizational support (POS) was positively related to failure-related trust among subordinates and supervisors which, in turn, was related to subordinates' risk taking. Additionally, supervisors' failure-related trust moderated the relationship between subordinates' POS and failure-related trust, such that when supervisors strongly believed the organization was trustworthy in risk situations, employees' POS had a stronger relationship with failure-related trust, which in turn, was related to risk-taking.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding employee risk-taking has both theoretical, practical, and social implications. It advances our theoretical understanding of employee risk-taking and it shows the role played by managers in the promotion of subordinates' risk-taking behaviors.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine the antecedents of employee risk-taking behaviors in the workplace. Additionally, it provides evidence for the key role played by supervisors in modeling subordinate's risk taking through social information processing. Another strength concerns the use of data from dyads (subordinates and supervisors), which helps us to overcome problems related to common method bias.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Karin Sanders and Birgit Schyns

This study focuses on the relationship between cohesion, consensus in the perception of leadership style of the supervisor within teams and solidarity behaviour of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on the relationship between cohesion, consensus in the perception of leadership style of the supervisor within teams and solidarity behaviour of employees towards their supervisor (vertical solidarity behaviour) and towards other team members (horizontal solidarity behaviour).

Design/methodology/approach

According to the self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates on the social identity theory, hypotheses for the relationship between consensus in perception within teams, cohesiveness within the teams and vertical and horizontal solidarity behaviour of employees were formulated. The hypotheses were tested in a study with 193 employees within 35 teams in a Dutch Ministry.

Findings

As expected, consensus in leaders' perception and cohesiveness within the team were positively related for transformational leadership style. Results from multi‐level analyses showed, as expected, a positive relationship between cohesiveness and horizontal solidarity behaviour. For vertical solidarity behaviour an interaction effect was found: the relationship between cohesiveness and vertical solidarity behaviour is positive if employees perceive their supervisor as high transformational, but is slightly negative if employees perceive their supervisor as low transformational.

Research limitations/implications

The finding that consensus in transformational leader's perception within teams is related to the cohesiveness of a team support the self‐categorization theory. On the other hand cohesiveness is only related to vertical solidarity behaviour when the supervisor is perceived as high transformational.

Originality/value

The different results mean that it make sense to distinguish between horizontal and vertical solidarity behaviour. In addition, they show the impact of consensus in the perception of leadership style on cohesion.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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