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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Ronan de Kervenoael, Catherine Canning, Mark Palmer and Alan Hallsworth

In the UK, while fashion apparel purchasing is available to the majority of consumers, the main supermarkets seem – rather against the odds and market conventions – to…

3760

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, while fashion apparel purchasing is available to the majority of consumers, the main supermarkets seem – rather against the odds and market conventions – to have created a new, socially‐acceptable and legitimate, apparel market offer for young children. This study aims to explore parental purchasing decisions on apparel for young children (below ten years old) focusing on supermarket diversification into apparel and consumer resistance against other traditional brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection adopted a qualitative research mode: using semi‐structured interviews in two locations (Cornwall Please correct and check againand Glasgow), each with a Tesco and ASDA located outside towns. A total of 59 parents participated in the study. Interviews took place in the stores, with parents seen buying children fashion apparel.

Findings

The findings suggest that decisions are based not only on functionality (e.g. convenience, value for money, refund policy), but also on intuitive factors (e.g. style, image, quality) as well as broader processes of consumption from parental boundary setting (e.g. curbing premature adultness). Positive consumer resistance is leading to a re‐drawing of the cultural boundaries of fashion. In some cases, concerns are expressed regarding items that seem too adult‐like or otherwise not as children's apparel should be.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the increasing importance of browsing as a modern choice practice (e.g. planned impulse buying, sanctuary of social activity). Particular attention is given to explaining why consumers positively resist buying from traditional label providers and voluntarily choose supermarket clothing ranges without any concerns over their children wearing such garments.

Originality/value

The paper shows that supermarket shopping for children's apparel is now firmly part of UK consumption habits and choice. The findings provide theoretical insights into the significance of challenging market conventions, parental cultural boundary setting and positive resistance behaviour.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Arunima Rana and Ravi Shankar

The case is written using secondary data sources (namely, research documents, press information, journal articles and published interviews). Publicly declared company…

Abstract

Research methodology

The case is written using secondary data sources (namely, research documents, press information, journal articles and published interviews). Publicly declared company information has further been leveraged to augment case facts. All information sources have been duly acknowledged in the reference section.

Case overview/synopsis

The case is written in the backdrop of COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on the Indian retail industry, revolving around scenarios in which a multinational retailer has to decide on its long- and short-term strategy in such an economic crisis. The case story has been developed around Marks and Spencer’s retail venture in the Indian market. With the COVID-19 pandemic impacting business at various levels, with countries moving to lock down and economies shrinking to recessionary levels, one of the worst affected sectors is retail. The teaching case builds upon Mark and Spencer’s initial decision of not entering and extending its food/grocery business in India. While it remained a dominant player in Indian fashion retail for almost two decades, it needs to re-think its decision of entering food retail owing to a pandemic situation affecting its offline sales/store footfall and increasing competition from global fashion brands such as Zara and H&M that had flooded the Indian fashion retail sector. The case provides a context for students to perform environmental factor and competitor analysis for a sector, with special focus on decision making in a changing crisis scenario.

Complexity academic level

This case could be used in undergraduate and MBA classroom programme, across subjects such as retail management, marketing management, international business, international business environment and strategic business management. This case fits while discussing topics such as business environmental factors, competitor analysis, decision-making under crisis, market entry decision, omnichannel retail strategy, consumer behaviour and brand management.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Roy Larke

The Japanese retail environment is of interest to businessmen,politicians and academics. Different observers tend to base their viewson their own vested interests and…

Abstract

The Japanese retail environment is of interest to businessmen, politicians and academics. Different observers tend to base their views on their own vested interests and national expectations, Japanese observers included. There is a need for more objective, unbiased research into Japanese retailing, consumer behaviour and marketing. Presents an overview of Japanese retailing employing predominantly Japanese language sources. Outlines briefly the general structure of the retail industry, emphasizing the large number of outlets overall. Considers the independent retail sector, notably the existence of street associations, and the corporate retail sector, putting emphasis on the latter owing to the lack of information available in English. Considers three forms of corporate retailing in detail, namely department stores, general merchandise stores and groups, and speciality shopping centres – commonly known as “fashion buildings”. In conclusion, notes that there is great scope for further research into Japanese retailing, and three general sectors are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Harold J. Carlson

The modern shopping centre developed in the suburbs of the UnitedStates following the Second World War as returning veterans sought homesfor themselves and their families…

Abstract

The modern shopping centre developed in the suburbs of the United States following the Second World War as returning veterans sought homes for themselves and their families. These suburban shopping centres were the product of two demographic events – the move to suburbia and the impact of the baby boom. Retailers of all types found the suburban shopping centre an ideal place for their goods and developers built centres of all types and sizes throughout the US in response to the need and demand during the 1970s. Today, there are over 37,000 shopping centres accounting for over 56 per cent of total retail sales excluding automotive and petrol service stations. The current overabundance of retail space coupled with a recession has created special problems for this industry.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Gerard Prendergast, Norman Marr and Brent Jarratt

Presents research which explores tenant‐manager relationships in managed shopping centres. In order to address this issue a sample of 16 shopping centre managers and 45…

2010

Abstract

Presents research which explores tenant‐manager relationships in managed shopping centres. In order to address this issue a sample of 16 shopping centre managers and 45 clothing retailers within these centres was taken in the lower North Island of New Zealand. Clothing retailers were chosen because of their tendency to locate in centres. Results showed that most managers were located at the centre site ‐ which assists in manager‐tenant communications. Managers tended to set tenant rent based on the area and site to be leased. When it came to shopping centre managers selecting tenants, store credibility and willingness to take part in public relations activities were the most important factors. Once the tenants were selected, managers encouraged most of them to contribute to an in‐house marketing fund. When it came to specific relationship issues, managers tended to have more positive views of their relationship with the tenants than the tenants themselves. Concludes that, although the centres have enjoyed success in New Zealand until now, there is still a need for managers and retailers to strive to work together in order to benefit equally from the relationship they have.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Rozenn Perrigot

This paper aims to review the differences between retailing and services in the particular context of franchised chains in order to highlight the main differences between…

2744

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the differences between retailing and services in the particular context of franchised chains in order to highlight the main differences between retail chains and services chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The existence of such differences is tested in the French context because its franchising sector is the most developed one in Europe as far as the number of chains is concerned. The empirical study deals with 530 chains among which 228 are services and 302 are retail.

Findings

Some significant differences between services and retail chains are underlined in terms of age, plural form, franchising fees, franchising and advertising royalties, and contract length. Additionally to these significant differences, the new trend in franchising seems to consist in developing more services chains than retail chains.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has some limitations. The focus is on only one country: France. A multi‐countries study could be useful to confirm these differences or highlight other ones. Furthermore, a more precise classification about the sectors of activities could underline other differences.

Practical implications

This paper can help the prospective franchisee to better differentiate the services chains and the retail ones, and better understand their particular features. Furthermore, the new franchisor can use these descriptive results to compare his/her practices with the average practices within the sector he/she is in, above all in terms of contract terms: franchising fees, franchising and advertising royalties, and contract duration.

Originality/value

This paper highlights differences between different kinds of franchised chains: retail vs services. These differences have not been underlined in previous research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Gerard Prendergast, Norman Marr and Brent Jarratt

Builds on an article, which looked at tenant‐manager relationships in shopping centres, published by the authors in IJRDM, Vol. 24 No. 9. Using data from the same research…

2579

Abstract

Builds on an article, which looked at tenant‐manager relationships in shopping centres, published by the authors in IJRDM, Vol. 24 No. 9. Using data from the same research project, this article compares the views of shopping centre and non‐shopping centre retailers. Despite many countries having seen a substantial growth in the number of shopping centres, not all retailers choose to locate within a shopping centre, and some retailers actively oppose shopping centres. A survey of clothing retailers in New Zealand showed that retailers in centres tended to have higher sales turnover than those outside centres. Retailers inside centres believed much more strongly that there are opportunities in locating within a centre. The main reasons for retailers not locating in centres were that the levels of rent are too high and the trading hours are too long.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Ruoh‐Nan Yan and Molly Eckman

Lifestyle centres are emerging retail locations and yet have not been included in past studies of shopping centres. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how…

3967

Abstract

Purpose

Lifestyle centres are emerging retail locations and yet have not been included in past studies of shopping centres. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how individual and retail characteristics impact consumers' patronage behaviours at three popular retail locations (i.e. central business districts, lifestyle centres, and traditional enclosed shopping malls) in the USA and understand consumers' perceptions of the three different retail locations.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey was conducted and 410 surveys were returned. Multiple regression analyses and t‐test were conducted to test proposed hypotheses.

Findings

This study revealed that shopping orientation, importance of retail attributes, and beliefs about retail attributes influence patronage behaviour (i.e. shopping frequency) at the three retail locations. Additionally, consumers' responses suggest that they did regard lifestyle centres differently from the central business district and the traditional enclosed shopping mall on many aspects of the retail attributes examined in this research.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that respondents were consumers of a specific geographic area with certain retail locations. Findings may not be generalizeable.

Practical implications

Understanding how consumers evaluate the three retail locations enables practitioners to develop and/or revise their retail strategies in order to be competitive in the current market.

Originality/value

This is the first study investigating consumers' perceptions of three major retail locations by including the newly emerging lifestyle centres in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Pallavi Pandey, Saumya Singh and Pramod Pathak

Research investigating turnover intention among frontline employees in the Indian retail industry is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting…

Abstract

Purpose

Research investigating turnover intention among frontline employees in the Indian retail industry is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting withdrawal cognitions among front-end retail employees in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the factors responsible for developing turnover intentions among the front-end employees. Data were analyzed using the ground theory approach.

Findings

Qualitative investigation revealed nine factors (abusive supervision, favoritism, perceived job image, insufficient pay, work exhaustion, perceived unethical climate, organization culture shock, staff shortage and job dissatisfaction) are responsible for developing turnover intention among front-end employees in the Indian retail industry.

Originality/value

The study uncovers antecedents of turnover intention among front-end employees in the relatively neglected Indian retail sector through a qualitative technique. Theoretical contributions, managerial implications, limitations and direction for future research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

David Rogers

Successful retailing concepts never remain static. When they become popular, competition increases and this inevitably leads to the need for differentiation and a…

Abstract

Successful retailing concepts never remain static. When they become popular, competition increases and this inevitably leads to the need for differentiation and a repositioning of marketing appeal. In America off‐price apparel retailing originated in the early 1970s, selling high quality brand name clothes from relatively spartan stores where the overheads were minimal. It was designed to serve a marketing void that fell between high priced department and speciality store goods and discount operations. Their success and growth has inevitably meant a move up market, however. In the second of an irregular series of articles on American retailing Dr David Rogers describes this experience and muses on whether an equivalent operation could work in the UK.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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