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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Jayant Anand

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to the experience of most developed countries, this study revealed that supermarkets and small retailers can coexist by catering to different income groups and product categories. Consumer choices are driven by the desire to reduce transaction costs in terms of time and money. In striking a balance between the two, consumers look for retail outlets that offer them the best value for their money with the least amount of time spent in shopping trips. Location of the store plays a critical role in buying choices that consumers make. In developing countries, generally, only high-income consumers can afford to own cars and choose to buy most products in supermarkets. Consumers without cars buy frequently purchased goods (foods) in small stores and infrequently purchased goods (consumer durables) in supermarkets.

Details

Economic Development, Integration, and Morality in Asia and the Americas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-542-6

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2022

Richard Kwasi Bannor, Bismark Amfo, Helena Oppong-Kyeremeh and Samuel Kwabena Chaa Kyire

This paper aims to assess the choice of supermarkets for purchasing fresh agricultural products among urban consumers in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the choice of supermarkets for purchasing fresh agricultural products among urban consumers in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Likert scale was used to investigate reasons for purchasing agricultural products from supermarkets, while heteroskedastic probit was used to estimate the determinants. Beta regression was used to examine the determinants of the proportion of food expenditure on raw/unprocessed agricultural products.

Findings

The principal reasons for purchasing agricultural products from supermarkets are convenience, a guarantee of assorted products, high-quality products and food safety, constant supply of products, conducive shopping environment, excellent customer service and social influence. The probability of purchasing agricultural products from supermarkets is high for consumers who are either males, young, educated, high-income earners or salaried workers. Consumers residing closer to supermarkets have a greater probability of shopping for agricultural products from same. The proportion of food expenditure on unprocessed agricultural products increases with age but decreases with education and distance to local markets.

Originality/value

Few prior studies have investigated supermarket’s surge in developing countries and its connection with consumer food-outlet choice. Unfortunately, little is evident in the extant literature on consumers' choice of supermarkets as purchasing outlets for fresh agricultural products. Hence, this study closes the gap on consumers and fresh agricultural product purchases from supermarkets in Ghana. Results from the study will provide grounding evidence to supermarket owners to adjust their services to meet consumers’ needs and provide relevant information to evolving supermarkets or investors who may venture into the supermarket business on the attributes that influence consumers to use supermarkets as a purchasing outlet.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

A. Celil Cakici and Sena Tekeli

This study aims to reveal the impact of consumers’ price sensitivity on their purchase intention within the scope of supermarkets. Besides, the study aims to examine the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal the impact of consumers’ price sensitivity on their purchase intention within the scope of supermarkets. Besides, the study aims to examine the impact of consumers’ price sensitivity on their price perception level and emotions and the impact of consumers’ price level perception and emotions toward supermarkets on their purchase intention. It also aims to detect the mediating effects of consumers’ price level perception and emotions toward supermarkets between their price sensitivity and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The quota sampling method was used to form the study sample. The population was 20–69-year-old consumers. The study sample included 513 consumers, 276 of whom were men, and 237 of whom were women. Data were collected via a questionnaire by the researchers in Mersin’s (Turkey) five central counties. Explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation models were used to analyze data.

Findings

Consumers’ price sensitivity, perception of cheapness, perception of expensiveness and positive emotions toward supermarkets affect their purchase intention. Besides, price sensitivity affects their perception of cheapness while it does not affect their perception of expensiveness. It influences negative emotions, but not on positive emotions. Consumers’ perception of cheapness and perception of expensiveness have impacts on positive emotions toward supermarkets. It was additionally discovered that perception of cheapness and perception of expensiveness affected negative emotions toward supermarkets. A contributed finding was that perception of cheapness had a partial mediating role between price sensitivity and purchase intention.

Practical implications

The study provides managerial implications in terms of understanding consumers’ behavioral changes, developing effective pricing strategies and achieving competitive advantages over the other retailing companies.

Originality/value

The study illustrates that consumer behavior can be explained by a theoretical construct considering the price perception levels and emotions toward supermarkets in examining the effect of consumers’ price sensitivity on their purchase intention. Therefore, it contributes to explain consumers’ behavior by bringing the stimulus–organism–response (SOR) model into a theoretical construct.

研究目的

本研究旨在揭示在超級市場的研究範疇內,消費者的價格敏感度對其購買意圖的影響。此外,本研究亦擬探討消費者的價格敏感度對其價格水平感知及情緒的影響,以及消費者的價格水平感知及對超級市場的情感對其購買意圖的影響。本研究亦旨在檢測在消費者的價格敏感度與購買意圖之間,其價格水平感知及對超級市場的情感兩者的仲介效果。

研究的設計/方法/理念

本研究用了配額抽樣法來建立研究樣本。研究的對象為20嵗至69嵗的消費者。研究樣本包括513名消費者,其中276人為男性,237人為女性。數據由研究人員透過一項問卷調查在梅爾辛省 (土耳其) 的五個中心縣取得。使用探索性因素分析,驗證性因素分析及結構方程模型來分析數據。

研究結果

研究結果顯示,消費者的價格敏感度,廉價感,對昂貴的看法及對超級市場的正面情緒,均影響其購買意圖。此外,消費者的價格敏感度會影響其廉價感,唯其對昂貴的看法則不受影響。價格敏感度對負面情緒帶來影響,但正面情緒則不受影響。消費者對廉價的看法及對昂貴的看法均影響他們對超級市場的正面情緒。研究亦發現,廉價感及對昂貴的看法均影響消費者對超級市場的負面情緒。貢獻的發現是:廉價感於價格敏感度與購買意圖之間扮演部分仲介角色。

實際的意義

本研究對管理有其作用。研究結果幫助管理人員更了解消費者行為的改變,發展有效的定價策略,以及比其它零售公司更能發展競爭優勢。

研究的原創性/價值

本研究闡明消費者行為是可以利用一個理論構建來說明的,而這個理論構建是透過考慮價格水平感知及對超級市場的情感來探討消費者的價格敏感度對其購買意圖的影響。因此,本研究透過把「刺激 – 機制 – 反應」模型變成為一個理論構建來說明消費者的行為, 在這方面,本研究是有其貢獻的.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Eluiza Alberto de Morais Watanabe, Caroline Rodrigues do Nascimento, Michele Gasparoto Moreira Teixeira de Freitas and Mayra Monteiro Viana

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived consequences of food waste and practices to mitigate it in supermarkets and restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with managers or other responsible persons with mastery of information about food waste of restaurants (self-service and à la carte) and supermarkets. The data were analysed via thematic content analysis.

Findings

The leading causes of food waste for the interviewed supermarkets and restaurants were improper handling by the staff, ineffective stock control management and lack of employee training. Supermarkets perceived other causes such as inadequate food packaging, refrigeration and temperature issues and dishonesty of carriers. The perceived consequences of food waste were mainly related to the economic aspect. Regarding adopting practices to reduce waste, some highlights are employee training, waste management by a specialized employee, assertive demand forecasting, meal preparation in the store and food donation. Just the supermarkets employ price reduction as a practice to reduce food waste. We concluded that, in general, supermarkets perceive more causes for waste than restaurants but do not necessarily present practices to mitigate these additional causes.

Originality/value

This research expanded the scope of studies about food waste and reveals procedures that those in charge can implement to reduce food waste. Our study analysed the causes, practices and consequences of food waste in two types of food channels (supermarkets and restaurants, in different formats). The literature does not clearly disclose aspects assigned to different food marketing channels, especially in emerging economies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Fatou Diop-Sall

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R), this study demonstrates how positive and negative emotions mediate the relationships between consumers’ perceptions of ECSR and consumers’ attitudes towards their supermarket. This study draws from cultural theory and works on sustainability and examines the moderating effect of the cultural context on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A supermarket intercept survey was conducted among 327 consumers in France and 444 consumers in Morocco. The proposed model was analysed using Amos 22.

Findings

ECSR’s impact on consumer loyalty varies across cultural contexts through the mediation of positive and negative emotions. The study also indicates how consumers’ levels of environmentalism moderate the direct effect of supermarket ECSR on consumers’ attitudes towards the supermarket.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study demonstrates how the dimensions of the cultural context moderate the direct and indirect effects of ECSR on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Specifically, favourable perceptions of supermarket ECSR have an ambivalent impact on consumers’ attitudes through the mediation of negative emotions, such as shame, in more collectivist, low uncertainty avoidance and short-term oriented countries.

Practical implications

Tailored recommendations for supermarket managers interested in ECSR and operating in an international context are provided.

Social implications

This research highlights the varying impacts of environmental actions in international retailing.

Originality/value

Using the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study reveals nuances to existing knowledge on the role of consumers’ emotions in international retailing. It reveals the salience of negative emotions after the perception of a positively valenced stimulus across distinct cultural contexts.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Juan Carlos Ríos-Fernández

This paper aims to study the use of cool roof technology to avoid unnecessary energy consumption in supermarkets. This will allow to reduce and even cancel the heat…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the use of cool roof technology to avoid unnecessary energy consumption in supermarkets. This will allow to reduce and even cancel the heat absorbed by the roofs, transferring it to the buildings and thus, creating more sustainable cities.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirteen real supermarkets with cool roofs were analysed in Australia, Canada, the USA and Spain. An analysis of so many supermarkets located in different parts of the world with different climatic zones has allowed an inductive analysis, obtaining real data of energy consumption associated with the air conditioning installations for a year with and without implementing the cool roof technology.

Findings

The paper provides insights on how the use of cool roof managed to reduce the need for energy for heating, ventilating and air conditioning by between 3.5 and 38%. Additionally, this technology reduces the annual generation of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per square meter of supermarket up to 2.7 kgCO2/m2. It could be an economical technology to apply in new and old buildings with a period of average economic recovery of four years.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may be generalisable. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test proposals in construction with other uses.

Practical implications

The paper includes economic and environmental implications for the development of cool roof technology and smooths the way for its implementation to increase energy efficiency in commercial buildings.

Originality/value

This paper is an innovative contribution to the application of cool roof technology as a source of energy savings in commercial construction through the analysis of supermarkets located in different countries with different climate zones. This will help other researchers to advance in this field and facilitate the implementation of the technology.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

T. Wing‐Chun Lo, Ho‐Fuk Lau and Gong‐Shi Lin

There is an argument that the channel of distribution reflects the economic development of a country. China is a developing country. When supermarket technology was…

6985

Abstract

There is an argument that the channel of distribution reflects the economic development of a country. China is a developing country. When supermarket technology was introduced to China in 1981, supermarkets were mainly serving visitors from overseas. When the economic environment improved during the 1990s, supermarkets in China shifted focus to the local community. The findings of this study showed that the nature of problems faced by supermarkets changed over time during the past 18 years. In the 1980s, most of the problems were related to technology transfer and the support from supplementary industries. In the 1990s, the problems were mainly related to competition and management issues. If China joins the WTO the Chinese government will speed up the development of the service industry. Supermarkets will then become a new power in the retailing industry in China. Multinational retailing giants will play a significant role in the technology transfer. However, their presence will also create tremendous pressure on local operators, forcing many inefficient ones out of the retailing scene.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Andrew Fearne, Rachel Duffy and Susan Hornibrook

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity…

9409

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors (meat, dairy, fresh produce).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a postal survey of supermarket suppliers, which formed part of a wider study of corporate social responsibility in UK supermarket supply chains.

Findings

The results demonstrate the heterogeneity in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors the extent to which retail and supply chain strategy is likely to influence the way in which supermarkets deal with suppliers. Best practice was most evident in the two supermarket supply chains where supply base rationalisation has virtually ceased and the adoption of lead suppliers and sole suppliers has been most evident in recent years.

Research limitations/implications

Postal survey limited to suppliers in three commodity sectors, where buyer power is greatest. Would expect different results for relationships with branded suppliers.

Practical implications

With supermarkets coming under increasing scrutiny over the way they treat suppliers, the conceptual framework and survey instrument represent a mechanism for independent assessment of supply chain relationships in sensitive markets, which could be used constructively to encourage the more widespread adoption of good practice and the elimination of bad practice in supermarket relationships.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of the first attempt anywhere to empirically measure fairness in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers. Further research is necessary but the results of our early work are extremely encouraging.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Svetlana Bogomolova, Julia Carins, Timo Dietrich, Timofei Bogomolov and James Dollman

This research describes and evaluates the co-creation of a programme called “A Healthy Choice”. Underpinned by design thinking (DT), this study aims to improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research describes and evaluates the co-creation of a programme called “A Healthy Choice”. Underpinned by design thinking (DT), this study aims to improve the healthfulness of food choices in supermarkets among consumers to promote their well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The research features two studies. Study 1 included five co-design workshops with consumers and staff (n = 32) to develop a consumer-centred programme. The findings supported the design and implementation of a programme evaluated in Study 2 (an ecological trial). The programme modified a supermarket environment to increase the prominence of healthier products (shelf-talkers and no discount), ran positive food experiences (cooking and label reading workshops) and was supported by a community-wide information campaign in social and local print media.

Findings

A total of 15 new strategies were developed by consumers and staff to support health and well-being in supermarkets. Feasibility discussions and staff voting contributed to the development and storewide implementation of the programme. Evaluation showed that the programme was effective in increasing consumer knowledge of healthier food choices (measured via public survey). Sales analysis showed mixed results; sales increased for promoted products in some categories, but there was no effect in others.

Research limitations/implications

Given the real-world setting in which this programme and its evaluation were conducted, there were several innate limitations. The co-design process generated many more ideas than could be implemented, thus creating a healthy “pipe line” for the next iterations of the programme.

Practical implications

The key contribution of this work to supermarket intervention literature is the recommendation to change the paradigm of engagement between the key stakeholders who are typically involved in supermarket programs. Using the co-design and DT frameworks, the authors offer an example of stakeholders working together in close partnership to co-design and collaboratively implement a programme that promotes healthier choices.

Originality/value

This project contributes to the emerging body of empirical work using DT principles in the area of healthy food choices in supermarkets. A rigorously designed evaluation of a co-designed supermarket programme contributes to scholarly evidence on food well-being programs in supermarkets.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Paul Norkett

Most of the largest UK supermarket chains are very successful; they have strong cash balances and generate large profits. The writer asserts that it is in the areas of…

Abstract

Most of the largest UK supermarket chains are very successful; they have strong cash balances and generate large profits. The writer asserts that it is in the areas of strong centralised control over margins, stock levels, cash flow and good lines of communication that supermarket chains have developed highly sophisticated control systems. This article looks at some of the larger supermarket chains in terms of margins and returns, working capital, labour, and the accountant's role in communication and control. It is an abridged version of an article which originally appeared in “Accountancy”, and is reproduced here with their permission.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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