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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Arieh Goldman

Looks at a study of issues involved in the introduction of the supermarket into a developing country — Israel. Discusses how urban consumers food shopping patterns have…

Abstract

Looks at a study of issues involved in the introduction of the supermarket into a developing country — Israel. Discusses how urban consumers food shopping patterns have been affected, and reveals many respondents, despite easy accessibility to the supermarket, continue to buy some of their foods in traditional stores. Analyses 310 questionnaires of residents of Jerusalem and bases results on this, as the random sample of 75‐80 households was then drawn from each of four areas. States that the study results demonstrate problems involved in the common practice of using supermarket's share of market type data as the sole basis for indicating rate of a country's diffusion of rates and limitations of share. Implies that the supermarket will transform the traditional system of small one‐line food stores, which are considered costly, and with inefficient distribution of food items, into one which will consist mainly of supermarkets.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Svetlana Bogomolova, Julia Carins, Timo Dietrich, Timofei Bogomolov and James Dollman

This research describes and evaluates the co-creation of a programme called “A Healthy Choice”. Underpinned by design thinking (DT), this study aims to improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research describes and evaluates the co-creation of a programme called “A Healthy Choice”. Underpinned by design thinking (DT), this study aims to improve the healthfulness of food choices in supermarkets among consumers to promote their well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The research features two studies. Study 1 included five co-design workshops with consumers and staff (n = 32) to develop a consumer-centred programme. The findings supported the design and implementation of a programme evaluated in Study 2 (an ecological trial). The programme modified a supermarket environment to increase the prominence of healthier products (shelf-talkers and no discount), ran positive food experiences (cooking and label reading workshops) and was supported by a community-wide information campaign in social and local print media.

Findings

A total of 15 new strategies were developed by consumers and staff to support health and well-being in supermarkets. Feasibility discussions and staff voting contributed to the development and storewide implementation of the programme. Evaluation showed that the programme was effective in increasing consumer knowledge of healthier food choices (measured via public survey). Sales analysis showed mixed results; sales increased for promoted products in some categories, but there was no effect in others.

Research limitations/implications

Given the real-world setting in which this programme and its evaluation were conducted, there were several innate limitations. The co-design process generated many more ideas than could be implemented, thus creating a healthy “pipe line” for the next iterations of the programme.

Practical implications

The key contribution of this work to supermarket intervention literature is the recommendation to change the paradigm of engagement between the key stakeholders who are typically involved in supermarket programs. Using the co-design and DT frameworks, the authors offer an example of stakeholders working together in close partnership to co-design and collaboratively implement a programme that promotes healthier choices.

Originality/value

This project contributes to the emerging body of empirical work using DT principles in the area of healthy food choices in supermarkets. A rigorously designed evaluation of a co-designed supermarket programme contributes to scholarly evidence on food well-being programs in supermarkets.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Jayant Anand

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to the experience of most developed countries, this study revealed that supermarkets and small retailers can coexist by catering to different income groups and product categories. Consumer choices are driven by the desire to reduce transaction costs in terms of time and money. In striking a balance between the two, consumers look for retail outlets that offer them the best value for their money with the least amount of time spent in shopping trips. Location of the store plays a critical role in buying choices that consumers make. In developing countries, generally, only high-income consumers can afford to own cars and choose to buy most products in supermarkets. Consumers without cars buy frequently purchased goods (foods) in small stores and infrequently purchased goods (consumer durables) in supermarkets.

Details

Economic Development, Integration, and Morality in Asia and the Americas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-542-6

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Juan Carlos Ríos-Fernández

This paper aims to study the use of cool roof technology to avoid unnecessary energy consumption in supermarkets. This will allow to reduce and even cancel the heat…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the use of cool roof technology to avoid unnecessary energy consumption in supermarkets. This will allow to reduce and even cancel the heat absorbed by the roofs, transferring it to the buildings and thus, creating more sustainable cities.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirteen real supermarkets with cool roofs were analysed in Australia, Canada, the USA and Spain. An analysis of so many supermarkets located in different parts of the world with different climatic zones has allowed an inductive analysis, obtaining real data of energy consumption associated with the air conditioning installations for a year with and without implementing the cool roof technology.

Findings

The paper provides insights on how the use of cool roof managed to reduce the need for energy for heating, ventilating and air conditioning by between 3.5 and 38%. Additionally, this technology reduces the annual generation of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per square meter of supermarket up to 2.7 kgCO2/m2. It could be an economical technology to apply in new and old buildings with a period of average economic recovery of four years.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may be generalisable. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test proposals in construction with other uses.

Practical implications

The paper includes economic and environmental implications for the development of cool roof technology and smooths the way for its implementation to increase energy efficiency in commercial buildings.

Originality/value

This paper is an innovative contribution to the application of cool roof technology as a source of energy savings in commercial construction through the analysis of supermarkets located in different countries with different climate zones. This will help other researchers to advance in this field and facilitate the implementation of the technology.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Neale J. Slack and Gurmeet Singh

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the supermarket sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 480 supermarket customers participated in an intercept survey in four urban centres of Fiji. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the level of service quality provided by supermarkets, and inferential statistics to determine the gap between customer's service quality expectations and perceptions and to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate service quality of supermarkets is perceived as being unsatisfactory, service quality significantly affects customer satisfaction and loyalty and customer satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between service quality and customer loyalty reducing customer's perceptions of service quality, leading to lower customer loyalty.

Practical implications

This study provides an indication as to where supermarkets should target their marketing attention and scarce corporate resources and may help in their efforts to service, satisfy, retain and attract more long-term loyal customers in the increasingly competitive supermarket sector. This research could inform government policy makers in sequencing the supermarket sector transformation and assist local supermarkets to adapt to this changing retail landscape.

Originality/value

This study advances our understanding of the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the supermarket sector.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Charles Dokcen, Vincent Obedgiu and Gideon Nkurunziza

The purpose of the study is to establish the mediating role of Perceived Service Quality on the relationship between Retail Atmospherics and Retail Store Patronage of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to establish the mediating role of Perceived Service Quality on the relationship between Retail Atmospherics and Retail Store Patronage of Supermarkets in Emerging Economies using empirical evidence from Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional research design and quantitative approach to understand stand the structured reality of Retail Store Patronage of supermarkets in context of emerging economies. In the context of this study, the data were drawn from Uganda's supermarkets. A sample of 1,504 customers were selected from 136,270 customers. Data was collected from supermarket customers using closed ended questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were derived to describe the behavior of customers and draw conclusions on population using sample statistics. Correlation analysis was used to establish the degree of association between the variables. Hierarchical regression was applied to assess the unique contribution of each variable; control variables-income and age, predictor variables – Retail Atmospherics and Perceived Service Quality on dependent variable – Retail Store Patronage. Mediation was done following the four-step procedures of mediation of Baron and Kenny (1986).

Findings

The results revealed significant positive relationship between Retail Atmospherics, Perceived Service Quality and Retail Store Patronage, confirming the direct hypotheses. Perceived Service Quality partially mediated the relationship between Retail Atmospherics and Retail Store Patronage. The findings depict that Retail Store Patronage is influenced directly by Retail Atmospherics and indirectly through Perceived Service Quality as a mediating variable. However, in situations where the atmospherics is good but perceived service quality is poor, Retail Store Patronage may not be fully realized.

Originality/value

The study provides information that is relevant for filling the practical and theoretical gap in the Retail Store Patronage in Ugandan supermarkets. Previous research studies investigated patronage behavior of shoppers in single retail units yet there is paucity of research on patronage behavior across different retail formats in the world. This study can be generalized and have strategic implications to developing economies that seek to grow and sustain their businesses. It points to the gaps that are normally overlooked and could lead business failure. The focus of most previous studies were on developed economies more especially Europe and America. This study in particular focused on the role of perceived service quality in the relationship between retail atmospherics and customer retail store patronage in emerging economies like Uganda as a testing ground.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

T. Wing‐Chun Lo, Ho‐Fuk Lau and Gong‐Shi Lin

There is an argument that the channel of distribution reflects the economic development of a country. China is a developing country. When supermarket technology was…

Abstract

There is an argument that the channel of distribution reflects the economic development of a country. China is a developing country. When supermarket technology was introduced to China in 1981, supermarkets were mainly serving visitors from overseas. When the economic environment improved during the 1990s, supermarkets in China shifted focus to the local community. The findings of this study showed that the nature of problems faced by supermarkets changed over time during the past 18 years. In the 1980s, most of the problems were related to technology transfer and the support from supplementary industries. In the 1990s, the problems were mainly related to competition and management issues. If China joins the WTO the Chinese government will speed up the development of the service industry. Supermarkets will then become a new power in the retailing industry in China. Multinational retailing giants will play a significant role in the technology transfer. However, their presence will also create tremendous pressure on local operators, forcing many inefficient ones out of the retailing scene.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Andrew Fearne, Rachel Duffy and Susan Hornibrook

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors (meat, dairy, fresh produce).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a postal survey of supermarket suppliers, which formed part of a wider study of corporate social responsibility in UK supermarket supply chains.

Findings

The results demonstrate the heterogeneity in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors the extent to which retail and supply chain strategy is likely to influence the way in which supermarkets deal with suppliers. Best practice was most evident in the two supermarket supply chains where supply base rationalisation has virtually ceased and the adoption of lead suppliers and sole suppliers has been most evident in recent years.

Research limitations/implications

Postal survey limited to suppliers in three commodity sectors, where buyer power is greatest. Would expect different results for relationships with branded suppliers.

Practical implications

With supermarkets coming under increasing scrutiny over the way they treat suppliers, the conceptual framework and survey instrument represent a mechanism for independent assessment of supply chain relationships in sensitive markets, which could be used constructively to encourage the more widespread adoption of good practice and the elimination of bad practice in supermarket relationships.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of the first attempt anywhere to empirically measure fairness in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers. Further research is necessary but the results of our early work are extremely encouraging.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Paul Norkett

Most of the largest UK supermarket chains are very successful; they have strong cash balances and generate large profits. The writer asserts that it is in the areas of…

Abstract

Most of the largest UK supermarket chains are very successful; they have strong cash balances and generate large profits. The writer asserts that it is in the areas of strong centralised control over margins, stock levels, cash flow and good lines of communication that supermarket chains have developed highly sophisticated control systems. This article looks at some of the larger supermarket chains in terms of margins and returns, working capital, labour, and the accountant's role in communication and control. It is an abridged version of an article which originally appeared in “Accountancy”, and is reproduced here with their permission.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Ugur Yavas and Secil Tuncalp

States that perceived risk is an integral component of contemporary models/theories of consumer behaviour. Assesses if perceived risk is a determinant of supermarket

Abstract

States that perceived risk is an integral component of contemporary models/theories of consumer behaviour. Assesses if perceived risk is a determinant of supermarket patronage using Saudi Arabia as an example. Draws the conclusions that: perceived risk is a determinant of supermarket patronage in developing countries; and it leads to variations in grocery shopping characteristics.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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