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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Wonsun Paek, Hyerin Ryu and Sunkyu Jun

The purpose of this study is to show that a corporate brand with a long history coupled with relevance to the present obtains heritage-based value in society and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to show that a corporate brand with a long history coupled with relevance to the present obtains heritage-based value in society and the second aim is to examine a boundary condition in which the heritage-based value of a corporate brand increases the firm’s financial value.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to investigate when and how a corporate brand obtains its heritage-based value in society and archival analysis was conducted to analyze the relationship between the heritage-based value of a corporate brand and the firm’s financial value.

Findings

The longevity of a corporate brand increased its heritage-based value, particularly when the brand was perceived to be temporally continuous, through the enhancement of authenticity perception and the heritage-based value had a positive effect on the firm’s financial value for younger firms.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the benefits of the heritage association of a corporate brand to the firm level but has a limitation in its cross-sectional method.

Practical implications

The study results justify monetary costs incurred in the course of developing and cultivating a brand’s heritage association.

Originality/value

It is believed that this study is the first quantitative research examining the relationship between the heritage-based value of corporate brands and firms’ financial value.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Lee Phillip McGinnis, Tao Gao, Sunkyu Jun and James Gentry

The understanding of the motives for consumers’ support of business underdogs is generally limited. The purpose of this paper is to help address this important research…

Abstract

Purpose

The understanding of the motives for consumers’ support of business underdogs is generally limited. The purpose of this paper is to help address this important research topic by conceptualizing underdog affection as a theoretical construct capturing the emotional attachment held by some consumers toward underdog business entities and advances two perspectives (self- and other-oriented) to unravel its motivational underpinnings.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the conceptual model, a survey study was conducted involving 365 respondents drawn from an electronic alumni association list from a medium-sized Midwestern university in the USA. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analyses were used to validate the scales, and the structural equations modeling method was used to test the hypothesized effects.

Findings

The data support most of the hypotheses (eight out of nine). Under the self-oriented perspective, commerce underdog affection is positively influenced by underdog orientation, need for uniqueness, nostalgia proneness, and hope, and is negatively impacted by their materialism level. Only hope did not impact consumer underdog affection. Under the other-oriented perspective, balance maintenance, top dog antipathy, and empathic concern positively influence underdog affection. The other-oriented factors, especially top dog antipathy and balance maintenance, show stronger effects on commerce underdog affection than self-oriented factors.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was geographically restrictive in the sense that it measured only one group of respondents in the USA. The conceptual model is limited in terms of its coverage of the consequences of underdog affection. While discriminant validity is established in the scale development phase of the study, relatively close relationships do exist among some of these theoretical constructs.

Practical implications

Given the significant evidence linking consumers’ underdog affection to underdog support in commerce, small locally owned businesses could use underdog positioning advertising to differentiate themselves against national retailers. Due to their tendency to display higher underdog affection in commerce, people with higher levels of balance maintenance, top dog antipathy, underdog orientation, emphatic concern, and nostalgia proneness, and lower levels of materialism can be segmented for marketing purposes.

Social implications

This research indicates that there are ways in which small business entities and non-profits alike can operate in a business setting that is increasingly more competitive and challenging for underdog entities.

Originality/value

This study integrates the various underdog studies across contexts to examine motives to underdog affection, a construct not yet operationalized in business studies. In addition, hypotheses linking eight specific antecedents to commerce underdog affection, via two theoretical perspectives, are empirically examined to assess relative as well as absolute effects.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Madhavan Parthasarathy, Sunkyu Jun and Robert A. Mittelstaedt

Extends the diffusion of innovations paradigm to today’s pluralistic marketplace by introducing the concept of multiple diffusion, whereby an innovation diffuses in…

773

Abstract

Extends the diffusion of innovations paradigm to today’s pluralistic marketplace by introducing the concept of multiple diffusion, whereby an innovation diffuses in multiple sub‐social systems, each with a distinct pattern of adoption, that together comprise the aggregate diffusion pattern for a given society. Identifies variables that affect the multiple diffusion process, presents propositions related to them, and discusses implications of this framework for marketing researchers and practitioners.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2004

Nitish Singh, Olivier Furrer and Massimiliano Ostinelli

With the growth of worldwide e‐commerce, companies are increasingly targeting foreign online consumers. However, there is a dearth of evidence as to whether global…

747

Abstract

With the growth of worldwide e‐commerce, companies are increasingly targeting foreign online consumers. However, there is a dearth of evidence as to whether global consumers prefer to browse and buy from standardized global web sites or web sites adapted to their local cultures. This study provides evidence from five different countries as to whether global consumers prefer local web content or standardized web content. The study also measures how the degree of cultural adaptation on the web affects consumer perception of site effectiveness.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Nitin Gupta

This paper seeks to explore whether predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments in an emerging market…

3518

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore whether predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments in an emerging market (India). Further, the paper aims to investigate if predisposition towards foreign brands (acting as a proxy for forces of globalization) would lead to consumer acculturation among consumers in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Instruments to measure predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation were developed on the basis of extensive literature review. The data comprised of urban, educated, middle‐class Indian consumers. The data were collected using structured questionnaire. ANOVA and T‐test results were used to determine if extent of predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the impact of predisposition towards foreign brands on consumer acculturation.

Findings

The findings indicate that significant difference exists among various demographic segments with respect to predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation. Also, predisposition towards foreign brands does impact consumer acculturation among Indian consumers. Various demographic factors such as age, income and educational qualification level significantly affect this causal relationship.

Practical implications

This paper provides interesting insights about the buying behavior of Indian consumers. These insights would enable corporate managers to develop more focused strategies catering to the Indian consumers.

Originality/value

The paper empirically demonstrates that Indian consumers, when segregated into various demographic segments, do show significant differences in their predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation. It also ascertains that predisposition towards foreign brands does lead to consumer acculturation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Nitin Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to study the extent of behavioral acculturation of consumer culture (B‐ACC) and attitudinal acculturation of consumer culture (A‐ACC) among…

1785

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the extent of behavioral acculturation of consumer culture (B‐ACC) and attitudinal acculturation of consumer culture (A‐ACC) among the urban, educated, middle class Indian consumers. It also aims to test if B‐ACC and A‐ACC among various demographic segments of Indian consumers differ on the basis of their ownership/usage of foreign brands vis‐à‐vis Indian brands.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study has been conducted to address the above mentioned objectives. Data have been collected from urban, educated, middle class Indian consumers using structured questionnaire and following snowball and judgment sampling methods. Data analysis has been done using ANOVA and T‐test.

Findings

The results show that highly educated Indian consumers who fall under the age group of 16‐25 years and belong to upper‐middle class show greater levels of B‐ACC as well as A‐ACC vis‐à‐vis other demographic segments of Indian consumers. In the total sample as well as among all the demographic segments, it was observed that B‐ACC is significantly higher than A‐ACC. Indian consumers who own/use foreign brands show significantly higher B‐ACC across most of demographic segments.

Practical implications

The research clearly identifies the segment which would be most receptive to the globalized marketing strategies of various multinational corporations.

Originality/value

The paper shows the extent of B‐ACC and A‐ACC among the Indian consumers. It provides empirical support to the contention in the extant literature that B‐ACC would be greater than A‐ACC among consumers in the emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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