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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Sunil Babbar, Xenophon Koufteros, Ravi S. Behara and Christina W.Y. Wong

This study aims to examine publications of supply chain management (SCM) researchers from across the world and maps the leadership role of authors and institutions based…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine publications of supply chain management (SCM) researchers from across the world and maps the leadership role of authors and institutions based on how prolific they are in publishing and on network measures of centrality while accounting for the quality of the outlets that they publish in. It aims to inform stakeholders on who the leading SCM scholars are, their primary areas of SCM research, their publication profiles and the nature of their networks. It also identifies and informs on the leading SCM research institutions of the world and where leadership in specific areas of SCM research is emerging from.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on SCM papers appearing in a set of seven leading journals over the 15-year period of 2001-2015, publication scores and social network analysis measures of total degree centrality and Bonacich power centrality are used to identify the highest ranked agents in SCM research overall, as well as in some specific areas of SCM research. Social network analysis is also used to examine the nature and scope of the networks of the ranked agents and where leadership in SCM research is emerging from.

Findings

Authors and institutions from the USA and UK are found to dominate much of the rankings in SCM research both by publication score and social network analysis measures of centrality. In examining the networks of the very top authors and institutions of the world, their networks are found to be more inward-looking (country-centric) than outward-looking (globally dispersed). Further, researchers in Europe and Asia alike are found to exhibit significant continental inclinations in their network formations with researchers in Europe displaying greater propensity to collaborate with their European-based counterparts and researchers in Asia with their Asian-based counterparts. Also, from among the journals, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal is found to exhibit a far more expansive global reach than any of the other journals.

Research limitations/implications

The journal set used in this study, though representative of high-quality SCM research outlets, is not exhaustive of all potential outlets that publish SCM research. Further, the measure of quality that this study assigns to the various publications is based solely on a publication score that accounts for the quality of the journals, as rated by Association of Business Schools that the papers appear in and nothing else.

Practical implications

By informing the community of stakeholders of SCM research about the top-ranked SCM authors, institutions and countries of the world, the nature of their networks, as well as what the primary areas of SCM research of the leading authors in the world are, this research provides stakeholders, including managers, researchers and students, information that is helpful to them not only because of the insights it provides but also for the gauging of potential for embedding themselves in specific networks, engaging in collaborative research with the leading agents or pursuing educational opportunities with them.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to identify and rank the top SCM authors and institutions from across the world using a representative set of seven leading SCM and primary OM journals based on publication scores and social network measures of centrality. The research is also the first of its kind to identify and rank the top authors and institutions within specific areas of SCM research and to identify future research opportunities relating to aspects of collaboration and networking in research endeavors.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579810192763. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579810192763. When citing the article, please cite: Sunil Babbar, Sameer Prasad, (1998), “International purchasing, inventory management and logistics research: An assessment and agenda”, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 18 Iss: 1, pp. 6 - 36.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Chwen Sheu, Roger McHaney and Sunil Babbar

Customer waiting is regarded as one of the most critical aspects of service quality. Research has suggested various approaches to reduce the negative impact of waiting…

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10059

Abstract

Customer waiting is regarded as one of the most critical aspects of service quality. Research has suggested various approaches to reduce the negative impact of waiting. This article investigates the waiting time performance of alternative service process designs that consist of two operations, order taking and order preparation. The research premise is that no single service process design is the best in all operating conditions. Managers should build flexibility into service process design by using alternative designs in combination. Several break‐even models are developed to examine the contingent nature of the performance of alternative designs. The results point to the need for building flexibility into service process designs by demonstrating that waiting time performance can only be optimized if design strategies are altered in response to ongoing changes in service system input parameters.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Sunil Babbar

Quality is increasingly becoming the key determinant ofdemand for goods and services. Managerial philosophy and perceptionsshape the overall corporate attitude towards…

Abstract

Quality is increasingly becoming the key determinant of demand for goods and services. Managerial philosophy and perceptions shape the overall corporate attitude towards quality and define the parameters for its role as a determinant of competitiveness and performance. Quality of services is defined and determined primarily by individual customers through their perceived delivery of service attributes expected. Customer input and feedback is essential for bridging the gap between the perceptions of management and those of the customers, as they view service quality. It is only the mutual synchronization of perceptions that ensures high quality. This article discusses important limitations of contemporary methods in use for the control of quality in services. It models a system and provides a complete and effective quality management framework. The proposed model is dynamic, flexible and utilizes information gathered through an unbroken chain of customer input and feedback in ensuring competitiveness through continuous improvement. Contributions of the model are also listed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Sunil Babbar and Arun Rai

The concept of flexibility in computer integrated manufacturing isintroduced. A production control hierarchy is developed as anevolutionary method towards computer…

Abstract

The concept of flexibility in computer integrated manufacturing is introduced. A production control hierarchy is developed as an evolutionary method towards computer integrated flexible manufacturing (CIFM). A strategically comprehensive implementation model is presented. The components of CIFM are identified, defined and their relationships examined. Potential benefits from incorporating flexibility and integration are indicated.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jerry Gosen, Sunil Babbar and Sameer Prasad

This research examines the literature on quality management in developing countries and explores the influence of important international and organizational variables on…

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2934

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines the literature on quality management in developing countries and explores the influence of important international and organizational variables on quality in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

By drawing from the literature and gaining input from industry panels, it formulates specific propositions depicting the influence of international (economic, political/legal, cultural/social) and organizational (goals/priorities, commitment/control, centralization/decentralization, networking) factors on quality.

Findings

A number of gaps are identified in the literature on quality management in developing countries along with significant challenges including differing perceptions of quality, the legacy of colonization and protectionist policies, and tight governmental controls.

Research limitations/implications

The framework of this research develops general relationships between quality and international and organizational variables. Based upon the propositions developed within this framework, future research can formulate and empirically test more specific hypotheses. Further, international and organizational variables are looked upon independently. Future research can explore possible interaction effects of these sets of variables on quality outcomes in developing countries.

Practical implications

Based upon this research, mangers of multinational corporations (MNCs) can better understand the role and affects of international and organizational factors on quality of goods and services in developing countries. Such understanding is an important requisite for the effective management of operations in developing countries.

Originality/value

This research identifies for MNCs the unique challenges international and organizational variables pose for quality management and operations in developing countries. The propositions developed help synthesize the literature on quality management in developing countries and provide a framework for future empirical research needed to support theory development in this area.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Sunil Babbar

A major problem encountered by high‐tech management is that of managingthe precision of product components and their assembly. For dimensionalmetrology, management’s…

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368

Abstract

A major problem encountered by high‐tech management is that of managing the precision of product components and their assembly. For dimensional metrology, management’s ultimate tool for technologically assuring measurement precision to the microinch, and the product reliability depending on this precision, is the use of gauge blocks for calibration. Using three comprehensive sets of data from high precision primary laboratories in the US and from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), not only explores, but also provides insights on, how reliable a calibration standard are gauge blocks. The results show that individual blocks do expand or contract over time. The true value of blocks was found to differ significantly from their specified nominal values. There was strong evidence that some blocks are in fact manufactured much above or below their nominal specification. Also a significantly higher range was displayed in measurements on larger blocks.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Sunil Babbar

Inadequate measurement capability can place a heavy burden ofimplicit costs on manufacturers – even drive them out of business.It can have serious consequences for…

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597

Abstract

Inadequate measurement capability can place a heavy burden of implicit costs on manufacturers – even drive them out of business. It can have serious consequences for stakeholders in industry, commerce or science. High‐technology manufacturing must ensure a high level of precision in measurements, often to as much as a millionth of an inch. In seeking such high levels of precision, measurement laboratories often use traceability as a key precision criterion. Two comprehensive sets of measurements made over time by high‐precision laboratories on gauge blocks are used to explore the scope of traceability in ensuring high‐precision measurements. Significant differences were found between the high‐precision primary laboratories traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the USA. Explores general implications of such between‐laboratory differences and makes recommendations for secondary laboratories and stakeholders in dimensional metrology seeking to ensure a high level of precision in their measurements.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Sunil Babbar and David J. Aspelin

Can a TQM initiative really fail? The primary aim of the article is toconvey a more astute understanding of the very essence of TQM. It showshow the TQM philosophy is…

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6257

Abstract

Can a TQM initiative really fail? The primary aim of the article is to convey a more astute understanding of the very essence of TQM. It shows how the TQM philosophy is founded in common sense, and why the infusion of TQM in any organization should result only in a win‐win situation. While stressing the value of the human resource, it sheds light on the practical application of TQM. It establishes an innovative and proactive perspective on TQM implementation. Most importantly, it challenges sceptics of TQM to re‐evaluate. In helping management and other employees understand the essence of TQM, addresses some commonly held misconceptions.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Sunil Babbar, Ravi Behara and Edna White

It is not sufficient for firms to deliver products that have technical excellence. Products should be easy to use and fit in with the work practices, activities and…

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3542

Abstract

It is not sufficient for firms to deliver products that have technical excellence. Products should be easy to use and fit in with the work practices, activities and context of the consumer. Product usability is now recognized as a critical dimension of product quality. Product usability is defined by product attributes that address the physical, cognitive and emotional needs of intended users. Based on a database of documented real‐world customer experiences with manufactured products in use, this research maps the categories of product usability using an affinity diagram. The resulting affinity diagram and the insights it provides can help managers design products that better meet the needs of their customers. Limitations of the study and the implications of its findings are also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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