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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2012

Sung S. Kwon

This chapter examines the sensitivity of executive incentive compensation to market-adjusted returns and changes in earnings for high-tech (HT) firms vis-à-vis firms (NHT…

Abstract

This chapter examines the sensitivity of executive incentive compensation to market-adjusted returns and changes in earnings for high-tech (HT) firms vis-à-vis firms (NHT) in other industries. Consistent with the hypotheses, this chapter uncovers the following evidence: First, the sensitivity of executive bonus compensation to market-adjusted returns is weaker and more symmetric for HT firms than for NHT firms (a control group), which implies that the problem of ex post settling up, documented in Leone et al. (2006), may be far less serious in HT firms than in NHT firms. Second, the sensitivity of executive incentive compensation to earnings changes is generally more symmetric for HT firms than for NHT firms, which is consistent with the view that HT firms engage in more conservative financial reporting than NHT firms. Third, the sensitivity of executive equity-based compensation to market-adjusted returns is significantly negative for HT firms compared to NHT firms when bad earnings news is announced. The results imply that HT firms, with a strong motive to attract and retain their highly talented executives, judiciously use both short-term and long-term incentive compensation schemes by compensating for a reduction of short-term incentive pay with an increase in long-term incentive pay. The issue of executive compensation has been a longstanding one in the United States and Canada, and the issue of executive compensation-performance sensitivity for HT firms is also relevant in this era of the information technology (IT) revolution, especially when prior research has shown that HT firms differ from NHT firms in their market-valuation process.

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Transparency and Governance in a Global World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-764-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Lukasz M. Bochenek and Sam Blili

This chapter presents results of a qualitative study among European champions in social media management. It aims to describe a strategic process and its implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter presents results of a qualitative study among European champions in social media management. It aims to describe a strategic process and its implications for social media strategic management.

Methodology/approach

The chapter is based on four in-depth case studies involving both primary and secondary data analysis and interviews.

Findings

Social media management is governed by similar principles as corporate communication management. However, there is an important role of personal preferences of senior executives for an effectiveness of the strategic process.

Practical implications

The model allows describing the social media management in the multinational companies. Organizational learning process drawn in this chapter can be directly applied in the multinational companies from various industries.

Social implications

Social media create an environment in which established actors need to learn how to communicate socially. Sophistication of the tools requires sophistication of the strategies and processes.

Originality/value of chapter

This chapter analyzes companies from various industries which are considered successful in social media strategic management. It creates a model which is applicable in various industries. It provides also insights into social media strategies from the research among social media global leaders.

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Social Media in Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-898-3

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Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2017

Abstract

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Advances in Pacific Basin Business Economics and Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-409-7

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2012

Abstract

Details

Transparency and Governance in a Global World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-764-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Ik-Whan Kwon and Sung-Ho Kim

This paper aims to explore avenue where suppliers and manufacturers are aligned with health-care providers to improve supply chain visibility. Supply chain finance is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore avenue where suppliers and manufacturers are aligned with health-care providers to improve supply chain visibility. Supply chain finance is explored to link suppliers/manufacturers with health-care providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing literature on supply chain visibility in health care forms a basis to achieve the study purpose. Alignment calls also for financial health where supply chain partners’ working capital is readily available to execute joint supply chain plan.

Findings

There is a disjoint in supply chain alliance between suppliers/manufacturers and providers where providers are unable to trace the origin of supplies. Quality care suffers and cost of care rises as providers search for supplies on an emergency basis. This paper provides a framework where solution can be formulated.

Research limitations/implications

Suppliers/manufactures form a direct strategic alliance with providers where product visibility enables health-care providers with a better patient management with lower cost of supplies. Inventory management and logistics cost will be lowered as better planning/forecasting is in place. This paper does not call for testing any hypothesis. Perhaps, next move along this line will be to investigate financial health of supply chain partners based on supplier relationship management practices.

Originality/value

This paper proposes health-care supply chain as an alternative solution to achieve the following twin purposes: controlling the cost while improving quality of care through supply chain finance. As far as we know, this study is the first attempt to achieve the goals.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7812

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

María Sicilia, Mariola Palazón and Manuela López

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in several aspects. Thus, this chapter reviews the literature on brand pages attending to the main differences with other virtual communities, the motivations to join brand pages and its consequences for consumers and brands.

Methodology/approach

The studies reviewed have allowed us to identify the main characteristics of brand pages as a communication tool, as well as the definition of an important research agenda for this topic.

Findings

We have identified the main unique aspects that characterize brand pages as a virtual brand community. The motivations to become members of brand pages are analyzed as well as the positive consequences of these pages on the marketing variables. We also identified the research needs on brand pages.

Social implications

This chapter can be useful to both, marketers, by showing them how brand pages work and what motivate consumers to join it; and researchers, by showing them the main gaps on brand pages that should be addressed in future studies.

Originality/value

This chapter highlights the role of brand pages as a communication tool. It constitutes an attempt to review the literature and organize knowledge on brand pages. The characteristics of brand pages and virtual brand communities, the motivations to participate, the consequences for the brand and an important research agenda are developed.

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Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Andrew Weyman, Thomas Klassen and Heike Schröder

We discuss workforce management, related to those aged 50+ , in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Korea. With international competitiveness becoming increasingly…

Abstract

We discuss workforce management, related to those aged 50+ , in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Korea. With international competitiveness becoming increasingly crucial, retaining the ‘right’ mix of employees to achieve strategic organisational goals is likely to determine organisational success. However, we argue that workforce management is not only influenced by organisational-level strategy but also by national institutional and sectoral policies. Decisions on whether and how to retain older workers are therefore (co-)determined by institutional incentives and barriers to doing so.

We find that British and Korean governments have legislated in favour of extended working lives and, hence, the retention of ageing workforces. In the United Kingdom, pension eligibility ages are being increased and in Korea mandatory retirement age has been raised to age 60. While changes to the UK pension systems leave individuals with the (financial) risks associated with extended working lives, the Korean government tries to protect individuals from financial hardship by enabling them to remain longer in their primary career. However, whether and how government regulation plays out depends on how organisations react to it. The Korean discussion, in fact, shows that there might be leeway: organisations might continue to externalise their employees early framed as honourable, or voluntary, early retirement, which might not be in the interest of the individual but very much in the interest of the organisation. It therefore appears as if the retention of ageing staff is not (yet) considered to be of strategic importance by many organisations in these countries.

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Managing the Ageing Workforce in the East and the West
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-639-6

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Kwonsang Sohn, Christine Eunyoung Sung, Gukwon Koo and Ohbyung Kwon

This study examines consumers' evaluations of product consumption values, purchase intentions and willingness to pay for fashion products designed using generative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines consumers' evaluations of product consumption values, purchase intentions and willingness to pay for fashion products designed using generative adversarial network (GAN), an artificial intelligence technology. This research investigates differences between consumers' evaluations of a GAN-generated product and a non-GAN-generated product and tests whether disclosing the use of GAN technology affects consumers' evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample products were developed as experimental stimuli using cycleGAN. Data were collected from 163 members of Generation Y. Participants were assigned to one of the three experimental conditions (i.e. non-GAN-generated images, GAN-generated images with disclosure and GAN-generated images without disclosure). Regression analysis and ANOVA were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Functional, social and epistemic consumption values positively affect willingness to pay in the GAN-generated products. Relative to non-GAN-generated products, willingness to pay is significantly higher for GAN-generated products. Moreover, evaluations of functional value, emotional value and willingness to pay are highest when GAN technology is used, but not disclosed.

Originality/value

This study evaluates the utility of GANs from consumers' perspective based on the perceived value of GAN-generated product designs. Findings have practical implications for firms that are considering using GANs to develop products for the retail fashion market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Eunha Koh

Although Korean sociology of sport is relatively unknown to the international community of scholars, it is a mature field in Korea. Sociology of sport was first introduced…

Abstract

Although Korean sociology of sport is relatively unknown to the international community of scholars, it is a mature field in Korea. Sociology of sport was first introduced in Korea in the mid-1960s when the field first evolved in North America and Europe. However, the development of the field shows different aspects from its Western counterpart due to unique cultural and environmental factors both in academia and in society. There are three major research trends that form Korean sociology of sport. First, there is the research focus on the benefit of sport and physical activity by examining empirical data using quantitative methodologies. The second group of researchers pays attention to individual experience in diverse sport fields and utilize qualitative methodologies to investigate empirical or secondary data. The third and most recent trend is a critical approach that theoretically analyzes ideologies, power relations, and identity politics in sport and society. When looking at the future, there are problems and limitations within the field in Korea. These include lack of continuity in terms of conference sub-themes, over-production of doctoral degree graduates, conservatism rooted in the field, and a danger of regarding sport policy research as an exit for sport sociologists. However, there are also possibilities and reasons for optimism. The biggest possibility for Korean sociology of sport is globalization of the field. Another significant possibility is the need for sport sociologists in planning, developing, and evaluating sport policy. Finally, diversification of the field gives ample opportunities for future research.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Taeyeon Oh, Hojun Sung and Kisung Dennis Kwon

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the stadium occupancy rate on television viewers’ game quality perception and stadium visit intention (VI).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the stadium occupancy rate on television viewers’ game quality perception and stadium visit intention (VI).

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted in which two groups were asked to watch video clips of professional soccer games with low- and high-stadium occupancy rates.

Findings

The results indicate that the higher the stadium occupancy, the higher is perceived game quality and the greater is stadium VI.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on the effect of the stadium occupancy rate on perceived game quality and VI.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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