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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Sung Lun Tsai, Chiho Ochiai, Chuan Zhong Deng and Min Hui Tseng

Several post-disaster housing extension and modification studies have indicated that owner-driven modification behavior relates to socio-economic and livelihood factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Several post-disaster housing extension and modification studies have indicated that owner-driven modification behavior relates to socio-economic and livelihood factors. This study aims to clarify housing extension patterns and examine the relationships among spatial characteristics, sociocultural factors, livelihood factors and housing extensions. This research also highlights the implications of post-disaster housing design for indigenous communities.

Design/methodology/approach

An indigenous community case study was conducted using a literature review. Moreover, interview surveys and housing measurements were implemented based on purposive sampling to diversify interviewees’ backgrounds and the extent of housing extensions.

Findings

This study confirms that housing extensions are closely related to the number of household members and their associated functions and cultural and livelihood factors that were ignored during the design stage. Furthermore, the housing extension process was confirmed to match households’ economic recovery. A post-disaster housing implementation framework for the indigenous population is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

This research only targeted one indigenous community with a limited number of interviewees and samples because of the connection with households.

Practical implications

The study’s proposed resilience post-disaster housing framework can be used to develop post-disaster housing design guidelines, which can benefit policymaking. The proposed participatory concept can be further adopted in future disaster risk-reduction programs.

Originality/value

This study uniquely focuses on the pre- and post-disaster housing layout and the livelihood of an indigenous community. It offers valuable insights for post-disaster reconstruction planners and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Sung Lun Tsai, Chiho Ochiai, Min Hui Tseng and Chuan Zhong Deng

The participatory method, a major factor for a successful post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) project, is applied in various stages of the PDR. However, the application of…

Abstract

Purpose

The participatory method, a major factor for a successful post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) project, is applied in various stages of the PDR. However, the application of this method for PDR involving indigenous populations is underexplored. Therefore, this paper aims to analyze the critical factors that can influence the participatory PDR in the indigenous context.

Design/methodology/approach

Two large-scale, indigenous, post-disaster relocation projects after the 2009 Typhoon Morakot were selected as case studies. The qualitative and quantitative methodology (semi-structured interview and questionnaire) were applied in the research.

Findings

A participation-friendly policy, community organization, the extent of damage, flexibility of nongovernmental organizations, understanding of the participatory concept and mutual trust were found to be essential factors that profoundly influence participation in PDR projects.

Originality/value

This study contributes by providing guidelines for future participatory PDR projects, especially in the indigenous context.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1960

C.G. ALLEN

The Communist revolution in China has led to the appearance in this country of increasing numbers of Chinese books in Russian translation. The Chinese names in Cyrillic…

Abstract

The Communist revolution in China has led to the appearance in this country of increasing numbers of Chinese books in Russian translation. The Chinese names in Cyrillic transcription have presented many librarians and students with a new problem, that of identifying the Cyrillic form of a name with the customary Wade‐Giles transcription. The average cataloguer, the first to meet the problem, has two obvious lines of action, and neither is satisfactory. He can save up the names until he has a chance to consult an expert in Chinese. Apart altogether from the delay, the expert, confronted with a few isolated names, might simply reply that he could do nothing without the Chinese characters, and it is only rarely that Soviet books supply them. Alternatively, he can transliterate the Cyrillic letters according to the system in use in his library and leave the matter there for fear of making bad worse. As long as the writers are not well known, he may feel only faintly uneasy; but the appearance of Chzhou Ėn‐lai (or Čžou En‐laj) upsets his equanimity. Obviously this must be entered under Chou; and we must have Mao Tse‐tung and not Mao Tsze‐dun, Ch'en Po‐ta and not Chėn' Bo‐da. But what happens when we have another . . . We can hardly write Ch'en unless we know how to represent the remaining elements in the name; yet we are loth to write Ch'en in one name and Chėn' in another.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Victor Zheng and Siu-lun Wong

The paper aims to explore the road to independence of the less-fortunate women in early Hong Kong society and their means in passing of wealth after death. In the 1970s…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the road to independence of the less-fortunate women in early Hong Kong society and their means in passing of wealth after death. In the 1970s, about 400 Chinese wills from the 1840s to the 1940s were dug up on a construction site in Hong Kong. One-fourth of these were from women who had held a substantial amount of property. How they obtained this property intrigued us because, at that time, women were seen as subordinate to men and excluded from the labor market. Why they had wills led to further questions about Hong Kong society of that time and the role of women in it.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of this paper is based on archival data gathered from the Hong Kong Public Records Office. These data include 98 women’s wills filed from the 1840s to the 1940s and a 500-page government investigation report on the prostitution industry released in 1879. The former recorded valuable information of brief testators’ family and personal life history, amount of assets, and profolio of investment, etc. The latter included testimonials of brothel keepers and prostitutes and their life stories and the background of legalizing prostitution in early Hong Kong. Apart from basic quantitative analysis on women’s marital status, number of properties, nature of wills and number of brothels, qualitative analysis is directed to review the testator’s life of self-reliance, wealth accumulation and reasons of using wills for arranging wealth transmission after death.

Findings

In this paper, the authors found that because the colonial government declared prostitution legal, and only women could obtain employment by becoming prostitutes or brothel keepers, they earned their own livelihood, saved money and finally became independent. However, because these professions were not seen as “decent”, and these women were excluded from the formal marriage system, intestacy could cause problems for them. Through their socio-business connections, they became familiar with the Western concept of testate inheritance. So, they tended to use wills – a legal document by which a person assigns someone to distribute his or her property according to his or her wishes after his or her death – to assign their property.

Research limitations/implications

Because only archival data are chosen for analysis, the research results may lack generalizability. Follow-up researches to examine whether the studied women acquired their wealth through their own work or simply as gifts from others are required.

Originality/value

This paper explores the understudied women’s life and method of estate passing after death in the early Hong Kong society. It fills the academic gap of women’s contribution to Hong Kong’s success and enriches our understanding on the important factors that could attribute women’s real independence.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Cigdem Gonul Kochan and David R. Nowicki

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused…

5211

Abstract

Purpose

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused review of the SCRES literature by investigating supply chain (SC) capabilities, their relationship to SCRES outcomes and the underpinning theoretical mechanisms of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the systematic literature review approach to examine 383 articles published between 2000 and 2017, ultimately down selecting to the most relevant 228 peer-reviewed studies. Context-interventions-mechanisms-outcomes (CIMO) logic is applied to organize and synthesize these peer-reviewed studies. A typological framework is developed from the CIMO-based classification of the SCRES literature.

Findings

The findings of this study outline the gaps in the SCRES literature and present an agenda for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents an exploratory research; therefore, the typological model presented is just one of the possible perspectives.

Practical implications

The typology of SCRES literature can help practitioners to understand SCRES and to measure and assess the resilience of SCs.

Originality/value

The paper provides clear definitions of SCRES constructs, develops a typological framework to further understand SCRES and identifies SCRES measures and assessment techniques.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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