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Article

Hina Khan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers, family-run small businesses (small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)) and their employees’ perceptions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumers, family-run small businesses (small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)) and their employees’ perceptions and attitude towards reform of the Sunday Trading Act in Britain.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach was employed to collect data in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 family-run small business owners/managers, 25 employees and 30 consumers. A survey was also conducted amongst 385 consumers and 279 employees. A convenience sampling method was used to collect data. Interview data were analysed by using content analysis and survey data were analysed by using descriptive statistics.

Findings

The results demonstrate considerable support for extending Sunday trading hours. Most of the arguments against the reform were found to be redundant. The findings suggest that in contemporary Britain, the restricted Sunday trading hours are perceived to be outdated and inconvenient.

Research limitations/implications

The findings demonstrate that a paradigm shift is needed to meet and understand the changing market conditions. This exploratory study is limited to the UK. Future research will be extended to other European countries.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study to investigate the current debate regarding the deregulation of the Sunday trading hours. This study highlighted the psychographic changes and socio-economic demand in the marketplace. Sunday trading offers different types of benefits to consumers, employees and SMEs. The study proposed an original model that categorised these benefits into three major levels: primary benefits, ancillary benefits and ultimate benefits.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Richard Barkham

Considers the potential impact of seven‐day trading on the spatialpattern of retail rents. Notes that the Institute of Fiscal Studiespredicts that Sunday trading will have…

Abstract

Considers the potential impact of seven‐day trading on the spatial pattern of retail rents. Notes that the Institute of Fiscal Studies predicts that Sunday trading will have no appreciable effect on the overall level of turnover in the retail sector resulting in a decline in the real value of retail rents. Concludes that shopping areas in large town centres are most vulnerable to a decline in retail activity.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article

Ann‐Marie Kennedy

This historical narrative aims to analyse the changes in shop trading hour laws in New Zealand, to explore the reasons behind the acceptance of Sunday trading. It compares…

Abstract

Purpose

This historical narrative aims to analyse the changes in shop trading hour laws in New Zealand, to explore the reasons behind the acceptance of Sunday trading. It compares New Zealand's experience with the USA and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical methodology was used in this paper. Historical methods used to collect the data which form this historical narrative include document analysis, literature reviews and in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The narrative uncovers that New Zealand more closely mirrors the experience of the UK with Sunday trading laws, however, less emphasis on religious aspects of the law may have contributed to New Zealand's acceptance of the law before the UK.

Research limitations/implications

The historical narrative focuses on New Zealand with a less in‐depth discussion of the USA and the UK. Further historical narratives into these other countries would allow for a deeper comparison between countries.

Originality/value

Sunday trading is seen as out of the ordinary in many parts of the world and New Zealand was one of the earliest countries to introduce it. This paper explores how New Zealand came to introduce Sunday trading after the USA, but before its forebear – the UK.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

David A. Kirby

Examines the likely implications for retail employees of a change in thelaw governing retail trading hours in Britian. Based on a survey conducted inAugust 1991 of 483…

Abstract

Examines the likely implications for retail employees of a change in the law governing retail trading hours in Britian. Based on a survey conducted in August 1991 of 483 female employees in six retail organizations, the findings reveal that while only 15 per cent of the sample were not prepared to work on a Saturday and 25 per cent non‐standard hours (evenings), some 51 per cent said they were unprepared to work on Sundays and a further 21 per cent only seldomly. Only a small minority believed that working unsociable hours would improve their relationships with their children, partner and family, and for a significant proportion, the possibility of working such hours was believed to be harmful. Concludes that any change in retail trading hours would have considerable implications for the lives of those whom the Act was introduced to protect.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Paul Freathy and Leigh Sparks

For many individuals, Sunday working in retailing is simply a factof life. With many retailers trading, some legally, others illegally, ona Sunday, there is a need to…

Abstract

For many individuals, Sunday working in retailing is simply a fact of life. With many retailers trading, some legally, others illegally, on a Sunday, there is a need to understand the Sunday labour market. Provides a general summary of the findings of a major survey into the structure, composition, terms and conditions and motivations of this Sunday retail workforce.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Daniel Smith

Examines the different employment structures in leisure and retailorganizations in the light of the recent Sunday Trading Act, 1994.Considers the make‐up of staff;…

Abstract

Examines the different employment structures in leisure and retail organizations in the light of the recent Sunday Trading Act, 1994. Considers the make‐up of staff; training methods; rates of pay and changing customer demand patterns in order to draw comparisons and identify possible emerging trends. Asks the question as to whether retail outlets and their leisure counterparts trade in similar conditions and what the impact will be on the Sunday labour pool and levels of pay. Draws interesting employment comparisons between leisure, part of the hospitality industry, and retailing as their opening times overlap to a greater degree. Finds that, consequently, they are increasingly competing for labour from similar sources.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Michael A Clements

Since the 1960s there have been over twenty attempts at changing the ambiguous and confusing 1950 Shops Act; the most spectacular failure was the most recent attempt, the…

Abstract

Since the 1960s there have been over twenty attempts at changing the ambiguous and confusing 1950 Shops Act; the most spectacular failure was the most recent attempt, the Shops Bill in April 1986. This piece of legislation foundered although it carried the support of the Prime Minister, her Cabinet, and a sizeable number in the House of Commons. In all cases attempts to change the legislation has been successfully blocked by a coalition of churchmen, trades unions, some retailers and other committed sections of the general public. The latest attempt, in the form of a (Tory) Private Member's Bill, is currently under way. Its thrust is a much more watered‐down set of proposals than those suggested in the Auld Report (and subsequent 1986 Shops Bill), calling for only DIY stores and garden centres to be allowed to open on a Sunday. Dr Clements takes a look at the implications these proposals might have on enforcement of the law, and reports the findings of two consumer studies that suggest that the proposals are not going far enough for many consumers. Empirical data referred to in the paper is drawn from two studies, each of over 1,000 households randomly selected in North Staffordshire, in November 1983 and again in November 1985.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Marko Grünhagen, Stephen J. Grove and James W. Gentry

Americans who travel internationally are often shocked to discover retail outlets closed during weekend and evening hours in cities such as Paris, Rome and Berlin. Based…

Abstract

Americans who travel internationally are often shocked to discover retail outlets closed during weekend and evening hours in cities such as Paris, Rome and Berlin. Based on the implicit assumption that demand clearly exists, retailers at various locations throughout the globe have increased their hours of operation. While political debate regarding a variety of issues (costs, the rights of labor, religion, etc.) often rages, there has been an implicit assumption that latent demand for longer hours of operations exists. This study investigates through a longitudinal examination consumer perceptions of Saturday shopping in a country where such an activity was previously restricted. Specifically, studies perceptions of Saturday shopping among a sample of German college students who were raised with limited Saturday shopping hours. Data were gathered in 1996 – the year German legislation allowed expanded hours for retailers – and again in 1999, and comparisons are made. Strong differences are found between consumer attitudes towards Saturday shopping at the time of expansion and three years later, indicating the need for differentiating retail strategies in Germany and in other parts of the world that may soon be providing similar expanded retail access.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Stephen Brown

What conceivable connection can there be between religion and retailing? In this original article Stephen Brown shows that the relationship — at least in Northern Ireland…

Abstract

What conceivable connection can there be between religion and retailing? In this original article Stephen Brown shows that the relationship — at least in Northern Ireland — is significant. It goes beyond the obvious subject of Sunday trading; ethnic factors are very apparent. For example, one can find two branches of the same symbol group in one village, each owned by shopkeepers of different religious affiliations. And green coloured garments do not sell particularly well in Protestant districts. There is also a strong “Boycott Eire Goods” campaign in Ulster, with some retailers in Protestant districts being “asked” to remove renegade Irish goods from their shelves.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Abby Cathcart

On the surface the subjects of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Critical Management Studies (CMS) seem to be closely related. Both are concerned with reflecting…

Abstract

On the surface the subjects of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Critical Management Studies (CMS) seem to be closely related. Both are concerned with reflecting on the impact of management and organisation on employees, the wider community and the environment. Both suggest that there may be a need for organisations to take responsibility for and account of people other than shareholders and both have used the concept of accountability to suggest that organisations may need to do more than just comply with the legal framework.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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