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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Hu Shaolin, Sun Guoji, Ouyang Huajiang and Chen Rushan

The purpose of this paper is to present research in detecting and identifying abrupt faults in controlled auto‐regressive (CAR) processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research in detecting and identifying abrupt faults in controlled auto‐regressive (CAR) processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Model‐based approach is adopted in this paper. Two series of fault‐tolerant iterative estimators are set up to estimate online the coefficients in a CAR process. Based on these fault‐tolerant estimators, the detailed detecting and identifying algorithms are obtained for not only the pulse‐type faults but also the step‐type faults in CAR process.

Findings

This paper illustrates the useful information that can be obtained from residuals and that can be used to detect pulse‐type faults as well as step‐type faults. A fault‐tolerant recursive estimator for the coefficients of the CAR process is put forward. Using a simple transformation from step‐ to pulse‐type faults, all kinds of diagnosis methods to detect and identify step‐type faults can be used.

Research limitations/implications

Fault‐tolerant estimators and fault detection and identification algorithms are aimed at abrupt faults in CAR processes.

Practical implications

Most of the algorithms given in this paper can be used in many different fields, such as process monitoring, safety control and change detection, etc.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research of abrupt faults and abrupt changes in a CAR process and emphasizes identification of magnitudes of abrupt faults. The fault‐tolerant estimators are effective not only to detect faults but also to identify safely the coefficients CAR model.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Yung-Ting Chuang and Yi-Hsi Chen

The purpose of this paper is to apply social network analysis (SNA) to study faculty research productivity, to identify key leaders, to study publication keywords and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply social network analysis (SNA) to study faculty research productivity, to identify key leaders, to study publication keywords and research areas and to visualize international collaboration patterns and analyze collaboration research fields from all Management Information System (MIS) departments in Taiwan from 1982 to 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first retrieved results encompassing about 1,766 MIS professors and their publication records between 1982 and 2015 from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan (MOST) website. Next, the authors merged these publication records with the records obtained from the Web of Science, Google Scholar, IEEE Xplore, ScienceDirect, Airiti Library and Springer Link databases. The authors further applied six network centrality equations, leadership index, exponential weighted moving average (EWMA), contribution value and k-means clustering algorithms to analyze the collaboration patterns, research productivity and publication patterns. Finally, the authors applied D3.js to visualize the faculty members' international collaborations from all MIS departments in Taiwan.

Findings

The authors have first identified important scholars or leaders in the network. The authors also see that most MIS scholars in Taiwan tend to publish their papers in the journals such as Decision Support Systems and Information and Management. The authors have further figured out the significant scholars who have actively collaborated with academics in other countries. Furthermore, the authors have recognized the universities that have frequent collaboration with other international universities. The United States, China, Canada and the United Kingdom are the countries that have the highest numbers of collaborations with Taiwanese academics. Lastly, the keywords model, system and algorithm were the most common terms used in recent years.

Originality/value

This study applied SNA to visualize international research collaboration patterns and has revealed some salient characteristics of international cooperation trends and patterns, leadership networks and influences and research productivity for faculty in Information Management departments in Taiwan from 1982 to 2015. In addition, the authors have discovered the most common keywords used in recent years.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Fusheng Xie, Ling Gao and Peiyu Xie

This paper examines the different features of China's economic development in different stages of economic globalization. The study finds that the investment- and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the different features of China's economic development in different stages of economic globalization. The study finds that the investment- and export-based growth model drove China's high-speed economic growth between 2000 and 2007, which came into existence around 2000 when China plugged into the global production network.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper also finds that China slowed down to the New Normal because of the disruption to the socio-economic underpinnings of this growth model. As China adapts to and steers the New Normal, supply-side structural reforms can channel excess capacity to the construction of underground pipe networks in rural areas of central China and fix capital while advance rural revitalization.

Findings

At the same time, enterprises must strive to build a key component development platform for key component innovation and the standard-setting power in global manufacturing.

Originality/value

The establishment of a domestic production network integrating the integrated innovation-driven core enterprises and modular producers at different levels can satisfy the dynamic demand structure of China in which standardized demands and personalized demands coexist.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Xue Gong

Since China’s “opening-up” in the late 1970s, Singapore has played a major role in enhancing China’s engagement with the world, especially in economic terms. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Since China’s “opening-up” in the late 1970s, Singapore has played a major role in enhancing China’s engagement with the world, especially in economic terms. This traditional relationship is well manifested in the third government-to-government (G–G) project under the BRI, which is known as the Chongqing Connectivity Initiative (CCI). The purpose of this paper is to address the following question: despite Singapore’s initial reluctance to agree on a third G–G project with China, why did Singapore eventually decide to join the CCI?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on archives of over 700 Chinese language media reports and over 400 English language media reports, as well as private interactions with scholars interested in Sino-Singapore relations and with both sides’ officials in charge of the CCI project.

Findings

The paper finds that it is the goal of connecting the region, along with the need to maintain Singapore’s relevance to China and the regional economy that led to Singapore’s participation in the third G–G project. This paper also uses this case to analyse the changes that are taking place in the bilateral economic relations.

Originality/value

Despite wide media coverage, op-ed commentaries and respective government statements, there are a limited number of academic studies on the rationale of the third G–G project and contemporary Sino-Singapore relations in the literature. The scholarship has not addressed the rationale for Singapore’s changing attitude towards CCI and the manner in which the CCI has improved cooperation (or upgraded cooperation to a broader and regional level).

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Shuang Ren and Ying Zhu

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the contemporary paradigm of business leadership vis-à-vis China’s reform and transitional context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the contemporary paradigm of business leadership vis-à-vis China’s reform and transitional context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs an evidence-based approach to explore the business leadership issues influenced by economic reform and within the context of societal transition in China. A qualitative research method was adopted based on in-depth interviews with a number of middle managers from a variety of Chinese enterprises, including state-owned, domestic-private and foreign-invested enterprises. Content analysis of several rounds of interviews added depth to the data analysis.

Findings

The findings complement existing thoughts and illustrate concepts, issues, and characteristics not yet emphasized in mainstream literature. General patterns and associated characteristics of business leadership in China, as well as specific patterns associated with different forms of enterprise ownerships, are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The study makes a timely and necessary contribution that enriches context-specific understandings of business leadership against the backdrop of surrounding economic, social, and cultural changes.

Practical implications

The study enriches understandings of commonalities and differences in leadership across the globe, facilitating working collaboratively to achieve common goals in a global community.

Originality/value

The study offers new insights into business leadership by linking contextual, personal, and cognitional factors together and demonstrates some unique characteristics of leadership styles in transitional economies like China.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Li Xue Cunningham and Chris Rowley

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and human resource management (HRM) and provide a review and research agenda, especially relating to the debate on convergence vis‐à‐vis divergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent research papers are discussed and possible convergence and the pressures on HRM and its practice in Chinese SMEs are examined. Key elements in Chinese HRM are highlighted. Four main dimensions of HRM are compared in terms of western and Chinese characteristics and their cultural impacts and problems. A conceptual framework to locate influences on Chinese HRM is outlined as well as a set of propositions for future research and examination of key HRM areas.

Findings

The continuing influences on HRM suggest that a distinctly Chinese HRM approach combining western practice with Chinese characteristics may be one way for SMEs to develop.

Originality/value

It is central to a better understanding of Chinese SMEs and helps fill some of the gap in the analysis of HRM in Chinese SMEs. It also offers insights which managers, policy makers and Chinese government can use to construct and reform the supporting system for SMEs.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Wu Qingjun

This article aims to study unionisation of foreign companies in China and to evaluate its effectiveness on representing labour rights and interests, so as to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to study unionisation of foreign companies in China and to evaluate its effectiveness on representing labour rights and interests, so as to explore the relationships between the Chinese unions and other industrial relations actors.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on in‐depth interview of key stakeholders from national, regional and company trade unions, as well as company management personnel. An archive study of union and company files is also conducted.

Findings

The Chinese trade union has realised that its interests stem from both the increase of membership dues and expansion of the membership base. Unionisation in transnational corporations (TNCs) is a key approach to achieve the interests of the union, which conducts grassroots mobilisation to counteract non‐operative companies but turns a blind eye on labour interest violations in collaborative firms. From the aspect of the union, the effectiveness of unionisation depends on raising its power leverage by affording fewer duties for the workers. Labour rights and workers' demands are not the structural concern of unionisation in TNCs.

Originality/value

The article challenges the research framework about Chinese unionism, which mainly emphasises a state‐union relationship or draws a corporatism perspective. The article concludes that the power relationship between the union and firm has acted as the key theme of the power struggle among industrial relations actors of China.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

ENZE LIU

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical review of China’s anti-corruption efforts, from the ancient period of Chinese slavery societies to the late 1970s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical review of China’s anti-corruption efforts, from the ancient period of Chinese slavery societies to the late 1970s before China launched its profound economic reform, under the current status of the harsh crusade against corruption that the Chinese new leadership initiated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is mainly based on a great deal of historical literature and empirical findings, with relevant comparative analysis on policies and regulations between various periods of China.

Findings

The phenomenon of corruption has existed in Chinese history for thousands of years, throughout Chinese slavery societies, feudal societies, republic period and the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Anti-corruption laws formed an important part of ancient Chinese legal system, and each dynasty has made continuous and commendable progress on fighting such misconduct. Innumerable initiatives have also been taken by the ruling party Chinese Communist Party (CCP) since the founding of the PRC. The PRC government created various specially designed government organizations and a series of updated regulations for preventing economic crimes. They have realized that periodic movements against corruption would no longer be helpful, and the paramount issue nowadays is indeed how bold the leaders are in striking out those unhealthy tendencies.

Originality/value

This paper fills in the blanks in the Western world with a comprehensive description of, and comments on, the historical efforts on China’s corruption and economic crime prevention. It also, in various ways, provides meaningful information that links to China’s current furious war against corruption.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

He Li

Economic statecraft is a critical aspect of China’s foreign policy and has played a vital role in China’s relations with its Asian neighbors. The Chinese economic ties…

Abstract

Purpose

Economic statecraft is a critical aspect of China’s foreign policy and has played a vital role in China’s relations with its Asian neighbors. The Chinese economic ties with Asia are significant not only because China is the second largest economy in today’s world but also because it has an important impact on regional economic co‐operation and international supply chains. Relentless growth in military buildup and more assertive foreign policy led many pundits to focus almost exclusively on political and military aspects of the Chinese grand strategy in Asia. The purpose of this study is to re‐examine this picture by studying China’s economic statecraft in the region.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper will address following research questions: How does the Chinese foreign economic policy serve its political aspirations in East Asia? Why has China increasingly relied on a combination of economic pressures and incentives to achieve its foreign policy objectives? How effective is China’s economic diplomacy as a strategic weapon? What are the limitations of such policy? What challenges does Beijing face in exercising its economic power in East Asia?

Findings

Beijing has a comprehensive, long-term grand strategy in Asia, and economic statecraft is a major component of it. Economic statecraft is a double-edged sword. It has given the People’s Republic of China more political influence but frictions and disputes between China and its trading partners are growing as well. Even with the slower growth of the Chinese economy, China will continue to be a game changer for the region. The economic diplomacy has long been part of the foreign policy toolkit used by the People’s Republic of China and will play more important role in the years to come.

Research limitations/implications

Thus far, China’s expanding economic ties with many countries in the world have not generated significant spillover effects. Although China is the dominant economic partner for every country in East Asia, its “soft power” remains to be weak. With the slower growth of the Chinese economy, another looming issue is whether China is going to be able to make a shift away from a trade- and export-led growth model that brought its dramatic economic success. All these could lead China’s economic statecraft less potent. Meanwhile, it should be noted that Asian economies that once relied on the USA are reaching a turning point as China comes to the fore, a trend that may challenge the existing international order. Should this momentum continue, it could alter the balance of power between Washington and Beijing in the region.

Practical implications

For Beijing, economic statecraft concerns both the economic dimension of foreign policy and the strategic dimension of economic policy. Although there is a growing literature on China’s soft power and military capabilities, the study of the economic dimensions of China’s foreign policy remains underdeveloped. With rising confidence and sophistication, Beijing has deployed economic resources to achieve geopolitical aims.

Originality/value

Needless to say, China’s economic statecraft has already triggered heated debate in the United States, Asia and elsewhere in the international community. However, the study of the Chinese economic diplomacy has received relatively little scholarly attention in the English-speaking world. This paper will fill a gap in the analysis and literature.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Chen Yang and Tongliang An

By observing facts of the “reversal of agglomeration” of Chinese enterprises during the period of rapid Internet development and using a new economic geography model…

Abstract

Purpose

By observing facts of the “reversal of agglomeration” of Chinese enterprises during the period of rapid Internet development and using a new economic geography model combined with the data of the real estate sector, this paper deduces the influence of the “reshaping mechanisms” of the Internet on China's economic geography based on the “gravitation mechanism” of the Internet that affects the enterprises and the “amplification mechanism” of the Internet that amplifies the dispersion force of house prices.

Design/methodology/approach

In the empirical aspect, the dynamic spatial panel data model is used to test the micromechanisms of the impact of the Internet on enterprises' choice of location and the instrumental variable method is used to verify the macro effects of the Internet in reshaping economic geography.

Findings

It is found that in the era of the network economy, the Internet has become a source of regional competitive advantage and is extremely attractive to enterprises. The rapidly rising house price has greatly increased the congestion cost and has become the force behind the dispersion of enterprises. China's infrastructure miracle has closed the access gap which gives full play to network externalities and promotes the movement of enterprises from areas with high house prices to areas with low house prices.

Originality/value

The Internet is amplifying the dispersion force of congestion costs manifested as house prices and is reshaping China's economic geography. This paper further proposes policy suggestions such as taking the Internet economy as the new momentum of China's economic development and implementing the strategy of regional coordinated development.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

Keywords

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