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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Husam Arman and Sulayman Al-Qudsi

This paper aims to propose a framework that combines the triple helix model with competitive strategies concepts to capture and guide any innovation-led national…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a framework that combines the triple helix model with competitive strategies concepts to capture and guide any innovation-led national development strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted a methodological framework based on existing methods and guidelines, the most commonly reported approach for developing a methodological framework. The review of fundamental approaches to achieving fast and sustained economic development, triple helix model and competitive strategies helped develop the methodological framework. The framework was validated and tested using the case studies approach on Korea, Taiwan and Singapore.

Findings

Kuwait aims to create an innovative environment to benefit from the innovation strategies anchored by the East Asian miracle economies and how they used the triple helix actors at different developmental stages. First, Kuwait’s research institutes and universities need to design interactive programs and activities with industry and community to help innovate solutions to current and prospective challenges. Second, the government needs to provide a competitive business environment and effective policies. Thirdly, the Kuwait industry must be encouraged to innovate and infuse modern technology practices.

Originality/value

Developing countries are trying to use science, technology and innovation as an effective strategy for achieving sustained economic growth. However, since each country has its unique conditions, learning from other success stories proved difficult if not structured in a framework designed to serve a specific purpose such as the one the authors propose in this paper.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Djehane A. Hosni and Sulayman S. Al Qudsi

The oil‐rich economy of Kuwait is seriously assessing its labour market prospects. Like other Arab Gulf States, it is constrained by a small indigenous population and work…

Abstract

The oil‐rich economy of Kuwait is seriously assessing its labour market prospects. Like other Arab Gulf States, it is constrained by a small indigenous population and work force and suffers from critical shortages in manpower. Foreign labour and skills are the catalyst of their accel‐erated growth. The nationals represent about 40 per cent of the population and only 22 per cent of the country'swork force.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Djehane A. Hosni and Sulayman S. Al‐Qudsi

Introduction Kuwait belongs to a grouping of countries — the Arab Gulf States — with unique characteristics in relation to other developing countries. Their vast financial…

Abstract

Introduction Kuwait belongs to a grouping of countries — the Arab Gulf States — with unique characteristics in relation to other developing countries. Their vast financial resources coupled with their small populations have given them the highest per capita incomes in the world. Kuwait, like its neighbours, faces a challenging manpower dilemma. Its national economy has been predominantly manned by foreign workers. Its ultimate goal is to reverse that labour trend.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Djehane A. Hosni and Sulayman S. Al‐Qudsi

The literature has more than exhausted the issue of growth versus basic needs. The conventional growth oriented strategies of the fifties and the sixties supported the…

Abstract

The literature has more than exhausted the issue of growth versus basic needs. The conventional growth oriented strategies of the fifties and the sixties supported the “trickle‐down” argument whereby the masses are supposed to benefit indirectly from growth. Yet evidence has shown the effects to be very weak. It was in that context that attention shifted towards meeting the basic needs of the population. The growth proponents criticised the basic needs logic because it emphasises consumption and redistribution at the expense of production and investment. It therefore sacrifices future development for current welfare. The counter‐argument stresses that meeting the basic needs of the population brings about improvements in productivity and income. Many case studies have demonstrated that if the objectives of basic needs and income distribution are pursued rationally, economic growth is not at stake.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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