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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Haiyan Kong, Sujuan Wang and Xingxing Fu

This paper aims to explore the influence of career expectations on job satisfaction of Generation Y, as well as the mediating effect of career expectations on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of career expectations on job satisfaction of Generation Y, as well as the mediating effect of career expectations on the relationship between hotel career management (HCM) and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the main tourist cities in China with Generation Y employees working in the hospitality industry as the target population. A total of 442 valid questionnaires were obtained, and structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships among the constructs.

Findings

HCM contributed positively to employees’ career expectation and job satisfaction. Career expectation was positively related to job satisfaction, as well as mediated the relationship between HCM and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the use of self-reported data in the cross-sectional design because all participants filled out the questionnaires by themselves. The use of convenience sampling method presents another limitation for this study.

Practical implications

This study may serve as a guide for managers and policymakers. First, this study highlights the importance of effective career management activities. Second, this study may help hotels retain the qualified staff members. Third, this study may help hotel managers respond to the career expectation of their young employees.

Social implications

The meditating effect of career expectation highlights its importance in the career management system. The main force of market labor is Generation Y, who are known for their high career expectation and their emphasis on their career development. The findings indicate that both extrinsic and intrinsic value factors provide greater contributions to job satisfaction than prestige and stability factors. Therefore, hotels must provide a stable working environment, and care more on employees’ intrinsic value. Aside from providing high compensation, employers should also provide career growth opportunities and challenging job to their employees, as they are important motivational factors. By providing tailor-made career activities, hotel managers may satisfy the career expectations and enhance the job satisfaction of young employees, which, in turn, leads to a mutually beneficial situation for both managers and employees.

Originality/value

This study explores the predictors and outcomes of career expectations of Generation Y employees. It highlights the importance of meeting the career expectations and also shows initial evidence on the mediating effect of career expectation. The findings of this study may provide useful guidance to both hotel operators and employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Fevzi Okumus

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Fansheng Jia, Yilin Zhang, Kam C. Chan and Sujuan Xie

This paper aims to examine the relation between religiosity and formal financing in the context of long- and short-term corporate loans.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relation between religiosity and formal financing in the context of long- and short-term corporate loans.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses archival methodology to conduct a multiple regression analysis with the amount of long- and short-term corporate loans as the dependent variable and a measure of religiosity as the key explanatory variable.

Findings

This paper offers four findings. First, when a private firm locates in a high religiosity region, it is more likely to get more corporate loans and the amount of corporate loans is positively correlated with the extent of religiosity. Second, religiosity drives a private firm getting more (less) short-term (long-term) loans. Third, a private firm in a high religiosity region is able to incur lower interest cost associated with more short-term loans. Finally, the results are confined to Buddhism, Taoism and Christianity.

Practical implications

Overall, the findings are consistent with the notion that religiosity shapes the local culture so that individuals, some of them are borrowers and lenders, show the religious traits in the formal lending and borrowing relationship.

Originality/value

Overall, findings of this paper are consistent with the notion that religiosity shapes the local culture so that individuals, some of them being borrowers and lenders, show religious traits in the formal lending and borrowing relationship.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Wenxue Lu, YuanYuan Hua and SuJuan Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influencing factors of cost performance of design-bid-build (DBB) and design-build (DB) projects and comparing the differences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influencing factors of cost performance of design-bid-build (DBB) and design-build (DB) projects and comparing the differences of influencing factors between these two delivery methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research identified and refined 14 influencing factors through literature review and academic expert discussions. Questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data about the influencing factors and project cost performance. Then those factors were reduced to four components by factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis is used to investigate the relationship between four principal components and project cost performance.

Findings

The results indicate that the significant influencing factors of project cost performance of DBB projects and DB projects are different. For DBB projects, owner abilities, such as owner team ability, owner experience, and owner finance, are important influencing factors causing cost overruns, while for DB projects cost performance is more sensitive to the contractor abilities, namely, contractor team ability, contractor finance, contractor experience, etc.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the paper are mainly derived by quantitative research method based on the survey of 144 samples, so the results may need validation by qualitative studies. Further research could apply case study or interview to validate the findings in this research. In addition, project type and location are not considered as control variables due to the limited number of samples, future research could be conducted to investigate their relationship with project performance.

Practical implications

The findings of this research not only help practitioners have a better understanding of the factors influencing project cost performance, but also provide some guidelines for practitioners to pay attention to different factors to better control the cost performance within different delivery systems.

Originality/value

Owner ability and contractor ability are found to be of different importance in influencing cost performance of DBB and DB projects. This research extends previous research on cost management by considering different significant factors in influencing project cost performance within DBB and DB projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Jing Liao and Jing Chi

Abstract

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2018

Kashef Majid and Mooweon Rhee

The purpose of this paper is to identify the rate of recall for new products vs established products and to explore the simultaneous impact of a firm’s reputation and a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the rate of recall for new products vs established products and to explore the simultaneous impact of a firm’s reputation and a product’s reputation on the market response to a product recall.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first use an accelerated hazard model to establish that new products are more vulnerable to damage than established products. Once this is established, the authors use a hierarchical linear model to explore the simultaneous impact of the firm and product reputation on the market response to a product recall.

Findings

The findings indicate that new products have a greater probability of recall over time than existing products and after a product recall a positive firm reputation can negatively impact the firm and hence becomes a liability. However, when the product is first introduced, the product reputation can help offset any negative market response; the product reputation can therefore be an asset.

Research limitations/implications

New products are more flawed than their established counterparts. A positive reputation can be a liability but a positive product reputation can offset the negative impact of the firm reputation and this is especially pertinent to new products.

Originality/value

The majority of prior research has focused on the reputation and assumed that the firm represented the product as well; the findings of this study reveal that the reputation of the product can have contrasting effects to the reputation of the firm.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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