Search results

1 – 10 of 154
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Low Sui Pheng and Daniel L.L. T'ng

This paper examines the managerial skills and role perceptions between the design leader and the client's in‐house professional staff which affect corporate…

Downloads
282

Abstract

This paper examines the managerial skills and role perceptions between the design leader and the client's in‐house professional staff which affect corporate communications. It also examines the consequential factors that influence the time taken to finalise the design for commercial building projects. Whilst all aspects of the design should be discussed to achieve a good product, the time spent on the development of design should not be so long that it affects the overall construction time and the achievement of the client's desired financial objectives. Each specialist in the design team will have something to contribute to the project which may consequently increase the complexity of conventional design development for commercial properties. The research methodology adopted in this study involves in‐depth case studies of two building projects which fundamentally seek to determine the organisational change, leadership and communication factors that influence effective design development of commercial building projects.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Shang Gao, Sui Pheng Low and Serene Simin Ng

Sluggish performance in construction productivity (CP) is a common occurrence worldwide. This phenomenon is also observed in Singapore. In this context, the role of trade…

Abstract

Purpose

Sluggish performance in construction productivity (CP) is a common occurrence worldwide. This phenomenon is also observed in Singapore. In this context, the role of trade unions (TUs) has also been mentioned but appears to be little understood. Hence, this study evaluates the role of TUs in contributing to CP. The key issue is to determine whether TUs have a role to play in contemporary society in improving CP.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes on multiple research methodologies; more specifically, the mixed-method of survey questionnaires and interviews is used. Firstly, a survey questionnaire was employed to obtain broad viewpoints on the general understanding of the target groups towards the CP issues in Singapore. The survey questionnaire also attempts to study the TUs in greater depth by examining their existing strategies of and hindrances to improving CP. Once findings were gathered from the survey questionnaire, the interviews were carried out to probe deeper into the phenomena in the results.

Findings

The research findings showed there is a generally positive outlook that TUs have the ability to contribute to CP. The study finds that the TU respondents possess strong attributes within the normative pillar, but weak attributes in the regulative and cultural–cognitive pillars.

Originality/value

This study uses the Institutional Theory as a general framework, which identifies a union's functions and activities in three pillars that underpin the institutional theory and defines its impact on construction productivity.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02632779410071704. When citing…

Downloads
1534

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02632779410071704. When citing the article, please cite: Low Sui Pheng, (1994), “Lessons from Lao Tzuʼs Tao Te Ching for the Facilities Manager“, Facilities, Vol. 12 Iss: 12, pp. 6 - 14.

Details

Facilities, vol. 21 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Xiaopeng Deng, Sui Pheng Low, Xianbo Zhao and Tengyuan Chang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the micro-level variables contributing to political risks in international construction projects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the micro-level variables contributing to political risks in international construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 25 micro-level variables were identified from the literature review, and a questionnaire survey was performed with 138 professionals from both academia and industry. Then, the Spearman rank correlation was used to test whether there was agreement on ranking between the two respondent groups. Furthermore, the 25 variables were grouped into six underlying factors through the exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that the most critical variables were “project desirability to the host country,” “relationship with governments,” “misconduct of contractors,” “public opposition to the project,” “experiential knowledge of political risks” and “advantageous conditions of contract.” In addition, the opinions within each group were consistent and there was no significant disagreement on the rankings of variables between academics and practitioners. However, the academic and practitioner groups held different opinions on some individual variables. The impact direction of the variables was associated with confusion among the respondents.

Originality/value

The findings presented in this paper can help international construction enterprises effectively manage political risks in international construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Low Sui Pheng and Gao Shang

Manufacturing, Western management theories and Japanese management practices.

Abstract

Subject area

Manufacturing, Western management theories and Japanese management practices.

Student level/applicability

This case can be used in project management or management-related courses at tertiary institutions at Undergraduate and Postgraduate level.

Case overview

This case provides students with an opportunity to find out what make Toyota so successful in manufacturing through its famous production system as well as the underlying Toyota Way principles. All students are expected to understand the Toyota Way model with a balanced view that goes beyond a set of lean tools such as just-in-time. This case opens a historical account for the Toyota Way model by connecting with possible Western management theories and Japanese management practices.

Expected learning outcomes

It is expected to significantly benefit students with industry experience with the intention of initiating appropriate changes in their own industry and/or organization by applying what they have learnt from the Toyota Way, through bridging with Western management theories.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Low Sui Pheng

Construction works, which contributed to the built environment of the primitive, slave and feudal societies in ancient China, constitute an important component of Chinese…

Downloads
1436

Abstract

Construction works, which contributed to the built environment of the primitive, slave and feudal societies in ancient China, constitute an important component of Chinese history. This paper discusses the nest and cave dwellings as well as the tools used in the primitive society (before 2100 BC) of China. Construction works in the Slave Society (2100‐500 BC) encompassed the construction of city walls as well as wood and earth structures, covering roofs, wall and floor facing, and drainage facilities. The invention of new building materials and construction tools as well as standardization in working procedures and material consumption are discussed in “Feudal society” (221 BC‐AD 1840). The paper suggests that the more than 5,000 years of rich history of construction works in China should not be ignored.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2020

Gao Shang, Low Sui Pheng and Ong Le Tian Gina

Construction productivity issues have constantly surfaced in Singapore's construction industry. To push for productivity, the Government has implemented various…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction productivity issues have constantly surfaced in Singapore's construction industry. To push for productivity, the Government has implemented various initiatives to encourage industry players, particularly small and medium enterprises (SMEs), and to adopt more productive construction technologies. One of these technologies is prefabrication prefinished volumetric construction (PPVC), a concept of the design for manufacturing and assembly (DfMA) approach. This exploratory study sheds lights on PPVC adoption and its issues in Singapore in the context of the launch of the Construction Industry Transformation Map (ITM).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used here is mainly a quantitative approach in the form of a survey. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to a pool of about 100 contractors, randomly chosen as part of a stratified sample. The questionnaire survey helps gain further insights into the industry's perceptions of PPVC and its adoption.

Findings

The study succeeded in identifying and analysing a list of drivers of and barriers to the adoption of PPVC. The top three most important potential drivers were “increase efficiency,” “technological change” and “changing nature of composition of workforce”. The three most important barriers were “ineffective on-site storage,” “high up-front payment” and “transportation issues”.

Originality/value

This study also looked into the organizational change management theory. Various theories were considered to help understand and implement change. It is understood that it is not only important for an organization to focus on the steps of these frameworks and models when the change is initiated but also for the organization to acknowledge and be mindful of the emotions of employees and take measures to overcome their emotions as part of organizational change management.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Low Sui Pheng, Tan Boon Kee and Allen Ang Aik Leng

To enhance and promote quality construction, the Construction Quality Assessment System (CONQUAS) was introduced in Singapore in 1989 to evaluate the quality performance…

Downloads
2136

Abstract

To enhance and promote quality construction, the Construction Quality Assessment System (CONQUAS) was introduced in Singapore in 1989 to evaluate the quality performance of building contractors using numerical scores. Apart from the CONQUAS system, the ISO 9000 quality management standards were also introduced in the Singapore construction industry in 1991. Is there a relationship between certification to ISO 9000 standards and the achievement of higher construction quality standards as indicated by CONQUAS scores? As several years have passed since the introduction of the CONQUAS system and ISO 9000 in the Singapore construction industry, this paper aims to ascertain if the implementation and certification of quality management systems to ISO 9000 standards in construction firms has helped them to achieve higher construction quality standards through higher CONQUAS scores.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Longhui Liao, Evelyn Teo Ai Lin and Sui Pheng Low

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical non-value adding (NVA) building information modeling (BIM) implementation activities in current building project delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical non-value adding (NVA) building information modeling (BIM) implementation activities in current building project delivery process, develop a BIM implementation readiness (BIMIR) evaluation model, and assess BIMIR statuses in building projects in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey and four post-survey interviews were conducted in Singapore. A fuzzy synthetic evaluation approach was adopted in the model development.

Findings

In total, 38 out of 44 NVA BIM implementation activities were deemed critical and used in the proposed model, among which “lack of involvement by contractors to contribute site knowledge” in the design development phase was ranked top. This model was validated in five projects. It was found that most of 73 surveyed building projects were in a low BIMIR status and the assessment results were consistent with current industry practices of BIM implementation in Singapore.

Research limitations/implications

There may be geographical limitation on the identification of the critical NVA BIM implementation activities. However, because BIM mandate spreads globally, the findings can help overseas project teams customize their own NVA activities and evaluation models.

Practical implications

As BIM implementation is mandated in Singapore, BIMIR evaluation helps local project teams identify weak areas of their BIM implementation activities and prioritize resources to enhance those areas.

Originality/value

No tool has been developed for evaluating BIMIR at the project level in the construction industry in Singapore or at large in Asia. Four BIMIR statuses are defined, which are consistent with Singapore’s BIM guidelines and standards.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Low Sui Pheng

While modern management literature abounds with theories on how best to achieve managerial efficacy )including the concepts of power in organisations, authority…

Downloads
1974

Abstract

While modern management literature abounds with theories on how best to achieve managerial efficacy )including the concepts of power in organisations, authority, empowerment, organisation politics, employees’ resistance to change, leadership style and conflict management(, it is timely to remember the basic guiding principles laid down in the Holy Bible which are still very applicable today. Although some of these principles may be at the back of their minds, many managers today are awash with complicated modern management concepts, so much so that the simple but yet time‐tested wisdom enunciated in the Holy Bible is conveniently brushed aside or overlooked. The guiding principles highlighted in the paper suggest that this should not be the case. Instead, modern management concepts should be synthesised with these guiding principles to attain managerial efficacy.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

1 – 10 of 154