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Article

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady and Glenda Cook

“Experts by experience' (EBE) involvement in professional health-care education programmes contributes to developing students” caring skills by supporting students…

Abstract

Purpose

“Experts by experience' (EBE) involvement in professional health-care education programmes contributes to developing students” caring skills by supporting students’ understanding of the lived experience and reality of service-users’ situations. Also, involvement in health-care education is a beneficial experience for EBEs themselves. This study aims to explore specifically older people’s experiences and perceptions of their involvement of EBE in gerontological education to generate insight into their understanding of this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, EBEs contributing to delivery of health-care professional education programmes at a UK university took part in focus groups (n = 14) to discuss their views and experiences of involvement in EBE teaching. Data were analysed using open coding.

Findings

Four themes emerged from the data, suggesting that older EBEs’ involvement in education may be beneficial for their well-being. The four themes were “contributing to improved care”, “having a purpose”, “being included” and “feeling appreciated”.

Practical implications

Findings support the requirement for nurse educators to develop EBE programmes that involve older people as not only a teaching strategy for students but also a method of promoting the health and well-being of the older EBEs.

Originality/value

There is limited research regarding specifically older EBEs’ experiences of involvement in gerontological education. This is an important area of study because involvement in education may constitute a means of engaging in social, community and voluntary activities for older people, which recent UK health policies advocate as methods of promoting and facilitating healthy ageing.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the requirements of Health Education England's (HEE’s) ACP workforce capability framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage design was used. Stage 1 analysed health and social care workforce intelligence reports to inform scoping of numbers of ACPs working in primary care. Stage 2 used two surveys. Survey 1 targeted ACP leads and collected strategic-level data about ACP application. Survey 2 targeted staff who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs. Survey 2 was in three parts. Part 1 collected demographic data. Part 2 required participants to record their perceived competence against each of the HEE ACP framework capability criteria. Part 3 required respondents to identify facilitators and barriers to ACP practice.

Findings

Despite the introduction of HEE's ACP capability framework, there is inconsistency and confusion about the ACP role. The results indicated a need for standardisation of role definition and educational and practice requirements. The results also suggested that some ACPs are not working to their full potential, while some staff who are employed as “gap-fillers” to provide routine clinical services perceive themselves as ACPs despite not working at the ACP level.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the application of ACP practice in primary care, few studies have considered ACP application in the light of the introduction of workforce capability frameworks aimed at standardising ACP practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article

Juliana Thompson, Anne McNall, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and identity of ACP roles, and how development of ACP roles that align with Health Education England’s capability framework for advanced clinical practice can be facilitated in primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was located in the North of England. A qualitative approach was used in which 22 staff working in primary care who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs were interviewed. Data analysis was guided by Braun and Clarke’s (2006) six phase method.

Findings

Five themes emerged from the data – the need for: a standardised role definition and inclusive localised registration; access to/availability of quality accredited educational programmes relevant to primary care and professional development opportunities at the appropriate level; access to/availability of support and supervision for ACPs and trainee ACPs; a supportive organisational infrastructure and culture; and a clear career pathway.

Originality/value

Findings have led to the generation of the Whole System Workforce Framework of INfluencing FACTors (IN FACT), which lays out the issues that need to be addressed if ACP capability is to be maximised in primary care. This paper offers suggestions about how IN FACT can be addressed.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Georgios I Zekos

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract…

Abstract

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract either under bills of lading drafted almost totally on the ship owners' terms or not to contract. The conflict between Britain and its rival the American merchant navy precipitated a movement for the use of model contracts of shipment (carriage) and towards standardisation of the liability of International liner carriers by legislative intervention. The bill of lading through its use in international trade gained the characteristic of being the document which incorporates the contractual terms. So, the orally agreed contract of carriage gave way to the contract of carriage in the form of a bill of lading.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Article

Jarka Glassey and Sue Haile

The purpose of this paper is to describe a concentrated strategy to embed sustainability teaching into a (chemical) engineering undergraduate curriculum throughout the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a concentrated strategy to embed sustainability teaching into a (chemical) engineering undergraduate curriculum throughout the whole programme. Innovative teaching approaches in subject‐specific context are described and their efficiency investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The activities in chemical engineering include a week‐long module introducing fundamentals of chemical engineering in the first year, a number of industrially relevant case studies within enquiry based learning (EBL) that have a great societal impact. Information regarding the transition towards EBL, the case studies on fuel cell effectiveness and sustainable plant design are provided in this contribution. Emphasis is placed on the methods of assessment of student learning, and evaluation of student preferences of delivery is included. Student focus groups and diamond ranking are used to evaluate the effectiveness of delivery.

Findings

Focus groups and diamond ranking have confirmed that students appreciate that sustainable development is a key issue for future engineers to understand and the case study workshops are a realistic, enjoyable and effective teaching method.

Originality/value

The paper describes the authors' efforts to embed sustainability into a curriculum from week 1 of chemical engineering curriculum, as well as providing input on sustainability into the curriculum of the remaining engineering disciplines. These approaches can be useful for other engineering higher education providers in ensuring effective sustainability education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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