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Gianina R. Baker

Higher education and student affairs professionals have a very important, active role in the lives of their students. The issues college students face are complex and…

Abstract

Higher education and student affairs professionals have a very important, active role in the lives of their students. The issues college students face are complex and higher education professionals must be properly trained to be able to address them (Franklin-Craft, 2010). Projections that by 2030 most college students in the United States will be non-White increase the responsibility of those working in higher education to truly understand the developmental issues of a diverse student body (Karkouti, 2015; Rankin & Reason, 2005; Torres, Howard-Hamilton, & Cooper, 2003).

This chapter highlights findings of a study that examined the multicultural competence of graduate students in a higher education program. Employing a snowball sampling method, completed surveys were received from 28 master and doctoral students out of 45 surveys distributed (response rate = 62%). Responses on the Multicultural Competence in Student Affairs – Preliminary 2 Scale (MCSA-P2) were also examined by race, gender, and other pertinent variables. The findings from this research indicate the need for infusing diversity into the curriculum and requiring diversity courses to increase the cultural competence of graduate students in higher education programs. The findings also support the need and call for additional research and analyses to be conducted on multicultural competence of higher education/student affairs professionals. Implications for graduate programs in higher education and reflexivity of the researcher conclude the chapter.

Details

Cultural Competence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-772-0

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part

Nicholas P. Salter and Leslie Migliaccio

This chapter reviews previous research on allyship: non-minority individuals who choose to support minorities while working to end discrimination and prejudice. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter reviews previous research on allyship: non-minority individuals who choose to support minorities while working to end discrimination and prejudice. In particular, the focus of this chapter is on how allyship applies to the workplace. We argue that allyship can be a diversity management tool to help reduce workplace discrimination.

Methodology

To explore this topic, we conducted a literature review on allyship in the workplace and synthesized previous research together. We examined research from both organizational and non-organizational settings.

Findings

Our review of previous literature is divided into three sections. First, we discuss what all entails allyship, including knowledge, communication, and, in particular, action. Next, we discuss the many outcomes previous research suggests comes from allyship (including benefits to other individuals, benefits to the overall culture, and benefits to the ally him or herself). Finally, we conclude with a discussion of who is likely to become an ally as well as the journey a person goes through to become a true ally.

Value

This chapter can be useful for practitioners who wish to promote allyship within his or her workplace. Organizations that want to strengthen their diversity and inclusion climate can consider developing ally training programs and promoting ally culture. Additionally, this chapter can be useful for researchers who wish to study the topic. Currently, there is a dearth of research on allyship specifically within the workplace; this chapter can help future researchers identify areas for empirical exploration.

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Diversity within Diversity Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-172-9

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Article

Sue Howard and Jonathan Smith

The purpose of this paper is to provide a valuable perspective on leadership within the police force.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a valuable perspective on leadership within the police force.

Design/methodology/approach

In this interview, Adrian Lee talks candidly with Sue Howard and Jonathan Smith about the current challenges facing police and public sector leadership.

Findings

Chief constable Adrian Lee's studies of theology, philosophy and law prior to him joining the police service have shaped and formed his sense of vocation and the values that are now central to many of the fundamental issues of leadership that the police service have to consider.

Originality/value

This paper provides the valuable perspective of a chief constable on the challenges facing leaders in the police force, and applies this to the public sector more generally. Chief Constable Adrian Lee believes that vision, values and vocation are essential elements for effective policing in the twenty‐first century.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article

Amanda Budde-Sung

Despite its Australian birthplace, the ugg boot industry is now fully dominated by one American company, and the Australian ugg boot industry has been frozen out of global…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite its Australian birthplace, the ugg boot industry is now fully dominated by one American company, and the Australian ugg boot industry has been frozen out of global trade. This study aims to consider the impact on the competitive advantage of culturally distinctive but not new, intellectual property (IP) through the historic lens of the Australia–USA battle over the UGG boot trademark.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses trademark applications, court documents, annual reports and brand reports to trace the history of the change and growth of the ugg boot industry from a small cottage industry in Australia to a billion-dollar monopoly controlled by an American company.

Findings

Court documents and trademark applications from 1979 to 2019 indicate that Australian firms underestimated the cultural differences between the USA and Australia and thus failed to adequately protect the generic word “ugg” in foreign markets where it was considered to be distinctive, rather than generic.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance of the first-mover advantage that can be conferred upon a firm by IP that is not new. Trademarks must be distinctive, rather than new, but properly used, they can offer substantial global competitive advantages to firms.

Originality/value

The in-depth analysis of the development of the UGG brand highlights the importance of intangible barriers in global business. The impact on the competitive advantage these intangible barriers gave US firms over Australian firms in the worldwide sheepskin boot market is discussed.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

Sue Edwards and Steve Smith

Examines how US and British financial institutions are implementing TQM to differentiate themselves from the competition. Discusses how customer satisfaction is achieved…

Abstract

Examines how US and British financial institutions are implementing TQM to differentiate themselves from the competition. Discusses how customer satisfaction is achieved through customer care programmes, quality action teams, improved internal and external communications, and quality performance standards. Contends that an emerging trend in the sector is that of quality performance standard setting, measuring and monitoring. States that the financial sector is responding to this challenge by concentrating its focus on providing quality services to its customers. Concludes that customer care programmes, action teams and improved communications are the first step; the next step in maintaining the competitive edge is the establishment of quality performance standards, and devising systems for measuring and monitoring their effectiveness.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article

Marijke Coetzee and J.H.P. Eloff

This paper seeks to investigate how the concept of a trust level is used in the access control policy of a web services provider in conjunction with the attributes of users.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate how the concept of a trust level is used in the access control policy of a web services provider in conjunction with the attributes of users.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is presented to provide background to the progressive role that trust plays in access control architectures. The web services access control architecture is defined.

Findings

The architecture of an access control service of a web service provider consists of three components, namely an authorisation interface, an authorisation manager, and a trust manager. Access control and trust policies are selectively published according to the trust levels of web services requestors. A prototype highlights the incorporation of a trust level in the access control policy as a viable solution to the problem of web services access control, where decisions of an autonomous nature need to be made, based on information and evidence.

Research limitations/implications

The WSACT architecture addresses the selective publication of policies. The implementation of sophisticated policy‐processing points at each web service endpoint, to automatically negotiate about policies, is an important element needed to complement the architecture.

Practical implications

The WSACT access control architecture illustrates how access control decisions can be made autonomously by including a trust level of web services requestors in an access control policy.

Originality/value

The WSACT architecture incorporates the trust levels of web services requestors and the attributes of users into one model. This allows web services providers to grant advanced access to the users of trusted web services requestors, in contrast with the limited access that is given to users who make requests through web services requestors with whom a minimal level of trust has been established.

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Internet Research, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Creating Entrepreneurial Space: Talking Through Multi-Voices, Reflections on Emerging Debates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-372-8

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Article

Suzanne Jane Smith, Jane E. Powell, Neil Summers and Susan Roulstone

The purpose of this paper is to explore perceptions of quality of life (QoL) of people with a dual diagnosis of learning disability and autism to facilitate a better…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore perceptions of quality of life (QoL) of people with a dual diagnosis of learning disability and autism to facilitate a better understanding for clinical practice and service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were used to gain perceptions of QoL from 20 individuals referred to their local diagnostic service. Individuals completed questionnaires and participated in in-depth interviews which were thematically analysed.

Findings

Subjective wellbeing scores were lower than those found in previous research. Social interaction was raised extensively with participants describing both positive and negative perceptions. The need for tailored social support and the value of individual control over environment were raised.

Research limitations/implications

The study was small in scale and limited to subjects who had been referred for a diagnostic service. The study identified the need for further investigation, particularly in relation to the social relationships domain of QoL, and the impact of stress and anxiety.

Originality/value

This study demonstrated that it is possible to access views from this group and that these views are nuanced. It suggests differences between reported QoL in people with learning disabilities who are and who are not autistic. Service design and individual approaches could be improved by a better understanding of these differences.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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