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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jennifer Rankin and Sue Regan

Too many health and social care services are failing to meet people's complex needs. In this paper, ‘complex needs’ is presented as a framework to help understand multiple…

Abstract

Too many health and social care services are failing to meet people's complex needs. In this paper, ‘complex needs’ is presented as a framework to help understand multiple interlocking needs that span health and social issues. The concept encompasses mental health problems, combined with substance misuse and/or disability, including learning disability, as well as social exclusion. The paper outlines a strategy for promoting the well‐being and inclusion of people with complex needs. At the heart of this strategy is a new kind of delivery model: connected care centres, a type of bespoke social care service, a model which has been endorsed by the Social Exclusion Unit (SEU). In addition, the paper describes how new responses from existing services can promote better support for people with complex needs, such as a reformed commissioning process and a new ‘navigational’ role for the social care worker.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Lynn Watson

Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Liisa Mäkelä

Women are, in increasing numbers, participating in the labour market and are an important part of an organisation’s human resource pool. Nevertheless, women still face…

Abstract

Women are, in increasing numbers, participating in the labour market and are an important part of an organisation’s human resource pool. Nevertheless, women still face inappropriate treatment at work. One cause of this is family‐related issues. In particular, pregnancy and child birth present special challenges for working women. Discrimination towards pregnant women is commonplace in work settings. Problems are often related to individual work relationships, for example, the one between the pregnant follower and her manager. It is important to understand problems that impact on women in working life that can disturb their job satisfaction, their performance and willingness to give their best for the organisation. Therefore, for the benefit of both employer and employee, existing practices in leader follower relationships during pregnancy are worth studying in more depth. In leadership studies, the Leader‐Member Exchange (LMX) theory is focused on dyadic leader‐follower relationships and is thus used here to understand this phenomenon. In the present article, the literature on pregnancy and work as well as on LMX is re viewed. On the basis of these reviews, a future research agenda is offered.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Peter L. Fitzgerald

Those parties who do become caught up in the sanctions and are blacklisted face a daunting situation. Their property and accounts are often blocked, and dealings with US…

Abstract

Those parties who do become caught up in the sanctions and are blacklisted face a daunting situation. Their property and accounts are often blocked, and dealings with US parties, and frequently their overseas affiliates as well, are essentially cut off with little or no warning by virtue of decisions made by a relatively small and obscure office within the Treasury Department. US as well as foreign parties can be blacklisted, and these restrictions can even extend to a firm's employees. The practical consequence of being touched by one of the Office of Foreign Assets Controls (OFAC) economic sanctions programmes may be the economic equivalent of capital punishment. By virtue of the restrictions, the blacklisted business may cease to exist as a viable entity.

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Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Adam Palmer and Nigel Bradley

This paper explores the question of whether there is an ethical business case for SMEs employing a more diverse workforce. Regan and Stanley (2003: p. v) have argued that…

Abstract

This paper explores the question of whether there is an ethical business case for SMEs employing a more diverse workforce. Regan and Stanley (2003: p. v) have argued that employers should look beyond their legal obligations in respect of disadvantaged groups. What attitudes do SME employers have to such proposals, what are their current practices and how can they be supported to meet skills shortages through employing a more diverse workforce? The primary data has been derived from focus group sessions with local SMEs and interviews with the procurement managers of large employers in Southampton. Examples of good practice in employment policies of SMEs, methods of engagement, attitudes to diversity and business benefits are discussed in relation to the literature on inclusion strategies for disadvantaged groups in employment. The feasibility of using supply chains to encourage employment diversity in SMEs is evaluated. Looking to future research, the paper considers how research, evaluation, benchmarking and analysis might support the exchange of ideas, knowledge, information and experience between local organisations. In concluding it reflects on how Southampton's labour market intelligence capability and the capacity of local organisations to deliver effective support services to businesses and individuals could be built. Finally, the paper initiates discussion on the feasibility of addressing low economic activity and participation rates among women and disadvantaged individuals and communities, while increasing the supply of skills and entrepreneurs to expand the small business and social economies.

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Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Milton C. Regan

Misconduct by lawyers in law firms is often attributed to pressures from increasing competition for legal services. Modern firms do face fierce competitive pressures. We…

Abstract

Misconduct by lawyers in law firms is often attributed to pressures from increasing competition for legal services. Modern firms do face fierce competitive pressures. We can gain more subtle insights, however, by focusing on the specific markets in which particular firms operate and how forms of influence in law firms interact with common patterns of behavior in organizations. This chapter draws on this approach to analyze the experience of Jenkens & Gilchrist, a national law firm that had to close its doors in 2007 because of tax shelter work that triggered civil lawsuits and government investigations.

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Special Issue Law Firms, Legal Culture, and Legal Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-357-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

Abstract

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

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Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2008

Jo May

In this article I examine one film, Puberty Blues, directed by Bruce Beresford in 1981. According to the Australian Film Commission, the film is number forty four of the…

Abstract

In this article I examine one film, Puberty Blues, directed by Bruce Beresford in 1981. According to the Australian Film Commission, the film is number forty four of the top Australian films at the Australian Box Office from 1966 to 2005 having earned over three million dollars. The view put here is that this film throws light on the history of the comprehensive coeducational high school at a particular moment. The article maintains that Puberty Blues pursues a damning representation of the ineffectual and irrelevant nature of school life for the students it features. This unsettling film shows the comprehensive coeducational secondary school, itself a product of a middle class vision of the civil society, to be failing in its promise of extending ‘respectable’ and materially aspirant middle class values to youth. It is suggested that the decline in patronage of the public coeducational comprehensive school by the middle class and aspiring others may in part be attributable overall to the powerful negative images of schools such as those in Puberty Blues that have widely circulated in Australian and Anglophone popular culture, especially in feature film. It also hypothesises that the middle class flight from the comprehensive high school may be in part attributable to the fact that some of their children may have ‘deserted’ the schools first.

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History of Education Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Phil Regan

Summary results of a survey of unemployed men conducted inLancaster and Morecambe in 1988 are presented. Particular attention isfocused on the long‐term unemployed, and on…

Abstract

Summary results of a survey of unemployed men conducted in Lancaster and Morecambe in 1988 are presented. Particular attention is focused on the long‐term unemployed, and on detailed aspects of skills, qualifications and work experience of the stock of unemployed workers.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

R.E. Bell

The trafficking of women for the purpose of sexual exploitation has become a global business operated by organised crime groups and is now viewed as having reached…

Abstract

The trafficking of women for the purpose of sexual exploitation has become a global business operated by organised crime groups and is now viewed as having reached ‘critical proportions’. Trafficking exists to meet the market demand for women who are used in brothels, the production of pornography and other aspects of the ‘sex industry’. It is nothing less than a modern day slave trade.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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