Search results

1 – 10 of 24
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Sue Peattie

Skin cancer is the world’s most prevalent form of cancer, yet it is one of the most preventable. Examines the challenge of communicating the “sun‐safety” health education…

Downloads
1925

Abstract

Skin cancer is the world’s most prevalent form of cancer, yet it is one of the most preventable. Examines the challenge of communicating the “sun‐safety” health education message to teenagers. Teenagers represent a key audience, because skin‐cancer risks are strongly linked to sun‐exposure behaviour and experiences during adolescence. Focus groups involving those concerned with child sun‐safety were conducted in both Australia and the UK. In‐depth interviews with UK teenagers were used to explore their experience of the Internet and their opinions on its potential as a channel for promoting sun‐safety. Both Australian and UK teenagers felt that they lacked information on sun‐safety. Interviews showed that teenagers thought that a good Web site should have speed of access, ease of reading and navigation, good links, audio‐visual effects and interactivity. They saw the Internet as potentially useful in providing information about sun‐safety, suggesting the use of celebrities, prizes with competitions, and teenage‐ rather than health‐oriented sites. The evidence from this research suggests that sun‐safety is a health education issue on which the particular communication characteristics of the Internet can be utilised to good effect. The results suggest considerable synergy between the Internet as a medium, sun‐safety as a message and teenagers as an audience.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 May 1995

Colin Gilligan

Given the ways in which the research pressures on university staff are becoming seemingly ever greater, an issue of the European Journal of Marketing that is given over to…

Downloads
3168

Abstract

Given the ways in which the research pressures on university staff are becoming seemingly ever greater, an issue of the European Journal of Marketing that is given over to a survey of the kinds of research initiatives which are currently being carried out is timely. The study which provides the basis for this was conducted between December 1994 and February 1995, with questionnaires being sent to staff in universities throughout Europe. At the time the final selection was made, a total of 150 responses had been received from 18 countries.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Sue Peattie

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However…

Abstract

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However, although the market has expanded there is now increasing competitiveness within this market from the new wine producing areas. More recently, competition is emerging from new drinks such as speciality beers and alcoholic soft drinks. The implications for the wine marketer is that there is a need to make full use of all the ‘tools’ within the marketing management toolkit. One of the most popular responses for marketers under competitive pressure in a range of industries is sales promotion. But despite being popular, sales promotion is poorly understood compared to advertising. This is partly because it has never enjoyed the academic scrutiny afforded to the more glamorous field of advertising. However, promotional techniques are now being studied individually and their appropriateness for different markets and marketing tasks is being discussed. Price‐based promotions have been the most popular in the drinks market, as in many other markets, but there is growing awareness that non‐price based promotions can add value for the consumer while meeting a range of marketing communications objectives. This article looks at the use of consumer competitions, one of the most popular non‐price promotional tools, with a survey of 319 competitions run by the drinks industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Sue Peattie and Ken Peattie

There appears to be a common misconception within financial servicesmarketing that the field of sales promotion is somehow irrelevant.Demonstrates that although some sales…

Downloads
1887

Abstract

There appears to be a common misconception within financial services marketing that the field of sales promotion is somehow irrelevant. Demonstrates that although some sales promotion tools are inappropriate for financial services, there are others which offer considerable opportunities for effective marketing communications. Focuses on one promotional technique which has had an increasingly visible impact within financial services in recent years – the promotional competition. Uses a survey covering 57 competitions to demonstrate the extent, nature and implications of their use to promote financial services.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Sue Peattie

Although the food retail market has continued to grow steadily during the 1990s, the number of retail outlets forced out of business has also increased. In order to remain…

Downloads
7548

Abstract

Although the food retail market has continued to grow steadily during the 1990s, the number of retail outlets forced out of business has also increased. In order to remain competitive, the food retailer needs to make full use of all the “tools” within the marketing management toolkit. Sales promotion, although a popular marketing tool, has never enjoyed the academic scrutiny afforded to the more glamorous field of advertising. Research that has been done has tended to concentrate on price‐based promotions. These have been the most popular among food retailers, as in many other markets, but there is growing awareness that non‐price‐based promotions can add value for the consumer while meeting a range of marketing communications objectives. This article looks at the use of consumer competitions, one of the most popular non‐price promotional tools, with a survey of 1,232 competitions which were jointly or wholly sponsored by food retailers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Ken Peattie and Sue Peattie

“Below‐the‐line” sales promotion as part of thecommunication mix is virtually ignored within the services marketingliterature, in comparison with personal selling…

Downloads
12469

Abstract

“Below‐the‐line” sales promotion as part of the communication mix is virtually ignored within the services marketing literature, in comparison with personal selling and “above‐the‐line” advertising. However, “below‐the‐line” techniques have been growing in their extent, credibility and sophistication during the last two decades. They have now reached the point where they deserve consideration in relation to other areas of marketing practice beyond their fast‐moving consumer goods (FMCG) origins. The different tools which make up the promotional toolkit have also reached a point where they deserve individual consideration instead of being bundled together. Seeks to demonstrate how one such tool, the promotional competition, represents a significant opportunity for services marketers. Reviews the literature relating to sales promotion to build a case for the suitability of competitions for services marketing, and presents the findings of a survey of 188 services‐sponsored competitions to explore the nature and extent of competitions′ use in practice.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Ken Peattie, Sue Peattie and Cerys Ponting

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance and implications of the issue of climate change to marketing communicators in both the private and public sectors…

Downloads
3262

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance and implications of the issue of climate change to marketing communicators in both the private and public sectors, and some of the challenges involve in developing effective climate change communications.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a combination of findings from secondary sources combined with some specific key insights drawn from primary research.

Findings

Effective communication on climate change which is capable of motivating changes in consumer behaviour (rather than simply raising awareness further) will depend upon: the relevance of climate change to consumers' lives and the relationship to their consumption behaviours being made clear; targeting strategies which take account of differences amongst key consumer segments; and developing a message which motivates rather than overwhelms consumers whilst avoiding any perceptions of “greenwashing”.

Practical implications

This paper explores a number of practical aspects of the challenges faced by commercial marketers seeking to engage with consumers about climate change, and it illustrates the potential for the transfer of knowledge and insight with social marketers working in the public sector.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its analysis of the multi‐faceted challenge of climate change as an important but challenging subject for marketing communications efforts, and in exploring the potential for the transfer of knowledge and insight between marketers in the public and private sectors.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

CCLM News. 1982. q. $5. Lenora Champagne, ed. Coordinating Council of Literary magazines, 2 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. ISSN 0273–3315. The idea that the arts should be…

Abstract

CCLM News. 1982. q. $5. Lenora Champagne, ed. Coordinating Council of Literary magazines, 2 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. ISSN 0273–3315. The idea that the arts should be supported by the people (through taxes) was a popular one in the late 1960, and in 1968 the Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines (CCLM) was established as an agency for funneling public monies to little magazines. Most of the early funding came from the National Endowment for the Arts. (NEA). The “salad days” of the 1960s, however, eventually gave way to—“Reaganomics”—which espouses a free‐market philosophy and support of the arts as the purview of the rich. In 1983, the CCLM received no NEA funds for its grants program and had to turn to private funds to support literary magazine publishing.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Sue Baines, Mike Bull and Ryan Woolrych

The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical overview of claims and counter claims around increased expectations that the third sector organisations (TSOs) will…

Downloads
1840

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical overview of claims and counter claims around increased expectations that the third sector organisations (TSOs) will compete for contracts to deliver public services. It does this through the lens of contested notions of being “businesslike” and “entrepreneurial” across the public and third sectors. Then it assesses how some of these tensions are currently played out between public sector commissioners and third sector service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a one‐year project funded under the ESRC Business Engagement Opportunities scheme (2009‐2010) in which the authors are working with NHS Manchester (responsible for commissioning and directing NHS funds into a wide range of services for communities across the city) and local third sector delivery and infrastructure organisations. The project consists of a set of knowledge exchange activities (scoping, workshops, placements and an on‐line tool) intended to help NHS Manchester reshape its local provider profile through market making and commissioning new service contracts from TSOs, especially social enterprises. Preliminary findings are reported from the review of academic and policy literature that formed the scoping stage of this project.

Findings

Public sector commissioners and TSOs often struggle to make sense of each others' world views and working assumptions. This cannot be easily overcome but ways of improving dialogue are proposed through exploration of third sector outcomes and entrepreneurial language, practices and mindsets.

Originality/value

This paper offers a new, grounded reflection on the nexus of public sector contracts, entrepreneurship and third sector values.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Pam Seanor, Mike Bull, Sue Baines and Rory Ridley‐Duff

In response to calls to critically analyse and conceptually advance social enterprise, the purpose of this paper is to examine narratives and models representing a…

Downloads
1045

Abstract

Purpose

In response to calls to critically analyse and conceptually advance social enterprise, the purpose of this paper is to examine narratives and models representing a spectrum of social enterprise from the “social” to the “economic”. The paper tests these against the experience of practitioners who were either employees in social organisations or support workers tasked with promoting social enterprise. This is timely against a background of imperatives from central governments for social organisations to compete for the delivery of public services and become more “entrepreneurial”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports qualitative research in which participants were invited to draw lines and arrows onto spectrum models to illustrate the social and economic contexts they perceived themselves to be working within. The data comprise interviews and drawings, combined with verbal descriptions of the drawings and reflections on their significance.

Findings

The paper shows how participants interpreted the “social” and “economic” of social enterprise in pictures and words. The research suggests that social enterprise can not be told as a single narrative but as a set of little stories showing oscillations, contradictions and paradox.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding of social enterprise can be much improved by giving greater recognition to ambiguities and compromises within the lived experience of contemporary practice.

Originality/value

The article offers new reflection on widely used images that represent social enterprise along a dichotomous, polar spectrum from social to economic.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

1 – 10 of 24