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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Sue Owen

Looks at the author′s work as a co‐ordinator of early yearsservices in an authority which has not integrated care and educationprovision. Her job is to liaise between the…

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Abstract

Looks at the author′s work as a co‐ordinator of early years services in an authority which has not integrated care and education provision. Her job is to liaise between the education and social work departments of the local authority, and to persuade and negotiate for changes in practice. In the absence of a true corporate strategy she has focused her efforts on working in the private and voluntary sector – often neglected in the power broking of local authority services – and on the creation of single‐issue projects to further the development of co‐ordinated services.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Thomas Owen Jacobs

The purpose of this paper is to examine an individual's capability to manage complex or “wicked” problems, and to suggest a logic for the design of interventions designed

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491

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine an individual's capability to manage complex or “wicked” problems, and to suggest a logic for the design of interventions designed to improve personal complexipacity.

Design/methodology/approach

The suggested logic is based on review of cognitive skill and neuro‐imaging research.

Findings

Fischer's model of successive cognitive stages, based on the operation of successively more demanding cognitive processes, serves as a foundation for intervention suggestions to strengthen executive cognitive processes and thus the ability to create complex mental models. Critical cognitive processes include response inhibition, reflection, and integrative association of differentiated perceptual elements. Intervention design must take into account both basic processes and epistemic cognition (for Tier Three problems).

Practical implications

Global complexity results in large part from intelligent but often covert competition by organizations and governments for scarce resources. Gaining and maintaining competitive advantage is essential for continued organizational and national well‐being. Interventions designed according to the suggested principles should increase personal complexipacity.

Originality/value

Application of these principles should materially enhance the value of interventions designed to strengthen personal capability to manage complex problem solving and decision making.

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On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Laura Bowering Mullen

The purpose of this paper is to report on the 32nd International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL) Conference held in Warsaw from 29 May to 2 June 2011.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the 32nd International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL) Conference held in Warsaw from 29 May to 2 June 2011.

Design/methodology/approach

This report uses a journalistic approach based on the author's attendance at the conference.

Findings

The findings, comprising recaps of sessions, will hopefully attract other librarians to consider attending future IATUL conferences, or to take some of the suggestions mentioned about “openness” in general and apply them in their own libraries.

Originality/value

This report reflects originality in that all information reported is solely the opinion and reflection of the author.

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Jill Manthorpe and Jo Moriarty

Providing housing with care may seem to be integration at its best. This paper investigates the workforce implications of this form of provision with a focus on older…

Abstract

Providing housing with care may seem to be integration at its best. This paper investigates the workforce implications of this form of provision with a focus on older people with high support needs.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Nicholas Banks

Research suggests that African-Caribbeans are less likely than their white British counterparts to ask for mental health support (Cooper et al., 2013). This is despite…

Abstract

Research suggests that African-Caribbeans are less likely than their white British counterparts to ask for mental health support (Cooper et al., 2013). This is despite research identifying that minority groups as a whole, when compared to the white majority, report higher levels of psychological distress and a marked lack of social support (Erens, Primatesta, & Prior, 2001). Those who do request support are less likely to receive antidepressants (British Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities, 1994; Cooper et al., 2010) even when controlling for mental health symptom severity, with African-Caribbeans less likely to make use of medication for depression even when prescribed (Bhui, Christie, & Bhugra, 1995; Cooper et al., 2013). Studies reporting on reasons for black people being less likely to attend for mental health consultation with their GP suggest a variety of explanations why this may be, focussing both on the suspicion of what services may offer (Karlsen, Mazroo, McKenzie, Bhui, & Weich, 2005) and the concern of black clients that they may experience a racialised service with stigma (Marwaha & Livingstone, 2002). Different understandings and models of mental illness may also exist (Marwaha & Livingstone, 2002). Different perspectives and models of mental health may deter black people from making use of antidepressants even when prescribed. Despite a random control trial showing that African-Caribbean people significantly benefit from targeted therapy services (Afuwape et al., 2010), the government, despite a report by the Department of Health in 2003 admitting there was no national strategy or policy specifically targeting mental health of black people or their care and treatment has not yet built on evidence-based success. One important aspect recognised by the Department of Health (2003), was that of the need to develop a mental health workforce capable of providing efficacious mental health services to a multicultural population. Although there were good strategic objectives little appeared to exist in how to meet this important objective, particularly in the context of research showing that such service provision could show real benefit. The Department of Health Guidelines (2003) focussed on the need to change what it termed as ‘conventional practice’, but was not specific in what this might be, or even how this could improve services to ethnic minorities. There was discussion of cultural competencies without defining what these were or referencing publications where these would be identified. There was a rather vague suggestion that recent work had begun to occur, but no indication that this had been evaluated and shown to have value (Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2001). Neither British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy nor British Psychological Society makes mention of the need for cultural competencies in organisational service delivery to ethnic minority clients. This chapter will describe, explore and debate the need for individual and organisational cultural competencies in delivering counselling and psychotherapy services to African-Caribbean people to improve service delivery and efficacious outcomes.

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The International Handbook of Black Community Mental Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-965-6

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Lee B. Wilson

Historians have long understood that transforming people into property was the defining characteristic of Atlantic World slavery. This chapter examines litigation in

Abstract

Historians have long understood that transforming people into property was the defining characteristic of Atlantic World slavery. This chapter examines litigation in British colonial Vice Admiralty Courts in order to show how English legal categories and procedures facilitated this process of dehumanization. In colonies where people were classified as chattel property, litigants transformed local Vice Admiralty Courts into slave courts by analogizing human beings to ships and cargo. Doing so made sound economic sense from their perspective; it gave colonists instant access to an early modern English legal system that was centered on procedures and categories. But for people of African descent, it had decidedly negative consequences. Indeed, when colonists treated slaves as property, they helped to create a world in which Africans were not just like things, they were things. Through the very act of categorization, they rendered factual what had been a mere supposition: that Africans were less than human.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-297-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Mark Faulkner and Sue Davies

This paper briefly describes the rationale for and the development of the CARE (Combined Assessment of Residential Environments) profiles. The CARE profiles represent a…

Abstract

This paper briefly describes the rationale for and the development of the CARE (Combined Assessment of Residential Environments) profiles. The CARE profiles represent a new approach to quality improvement in care homes for older people that seeks to gain the views of residents, relatives and staff, and to use these as a basis for celebrating what works well in a home and identifying areas that need attention. The paper begins with a consideration of the limitations of existing quality initiatives and argues for a model that is more inclusive. Subsequently, the theoretical underpinnings of the CARE profiles, positive events, the Senses Framework, and a relationship‐centred approach to care are outlined. The process by which the CARE profiles were developed is then described and a case study highlighting how they might be used is presented.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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2561

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

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Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Sue Sharples

Snob, the women's fashion chain, was a typical sixties product — brash, crude, with red interiors decked about with Portobello Road pseudo twenties enamel advertisements…

Abstract

Snob, the women's fashion chain, was a typical sixties product — brash, crude, with red interiors decked about with Portobello Road pseudo twenties enamel advertisements, and so it had remained. Its failure last year gave a wonderful opportunity for a new managemet to give it a drastic overhaul, and surprisingly perhaps it wasn't snapped up by one of the larger fashion groups. They were pipped to the post by a relative newcomer in the retailing world, the Coutwall group, who are better known for clothes manufacturing. Sue Sharples takes a look at the new owners, charts their journey up the retailing ladder and examines their latest acquisition, which has been redesigned by John Michael Design Consultants.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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