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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Clare Newton, Sue Wilks and Dominique Hes

This paper discusses the opportunity afforded by a substantial research grant to examine three aspects of recent school design and learning. First, spaces that support…

Abstract

This paper discusses the opportunity afforded by a substantial research grant to examine three aspects of recent school design and learning. First, spaces that support effective learning, second, the role of the building in achieving sustainability, and third, pedagogies and practices that support one and two. Schools are complex systems in which the physical environment interacts with pedagogical, socio-cultural, curricular, motivational and socio-economic factors as well as providing benefits or costs in environmental terms. Limiting the research focus to exemplar case study schools will enable a more comprehensive study of the schools as 3D texts. Through proactive research methodologies, students, teachers and architects will collaborate to manipulate the spaces to suit different learning modalities. Students will help collect environmental data and therefore learn more about climate and energy. They will also participate within teams to further their problem solving, communication and organizational skills. Teachers will become more aware of and hopefully skilled at managing space both environmentally and pedagogically. Architects will have the unusual opportunity of experiencing and analyzing their designs through the eyes of users. While this ambitious research is in its infancy, the interdisciplinary approach and support from nine industry partners is relevant for other researchers who are seeking to have an impact on design practice using an action research methodology. The research is timely.4 Following in the footsteps of the United Kingdom, Australian state and federal governments have committed to reinvigorate our aging school stock. This research led by an interdisciplinary team, was developed in partnership with Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, the Victorian Government Architect's Office, and seven design firms with expertise in learning environments. The research has been funded by the Australian Research Council

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Open House International, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Sue Newton

Discusses the Total Quality culture of Harvester restaurants, concentrating on training to achieve the company′s mission of delivering a high quality service to its…

Abstract

Discusses the Total Quality culture of Harvester restaurants, concentrating on training to achieve the company′s mission of delivering a high quality service to its guests. Outlines the importance of teamwork in the programme, and provides a case study of the executive team, showing how the system works in practice.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Sue Newton

Examines implementation of the total quality culture in Harvester Restaurants, where it is considered a way of life. Maintains that training is vital to attaining the…

Abstract

Examines implementation of the total quality culture in Harvester Restaurants, where it is considered a way of life. Maintains that training is vital to attaining the company′s goal of delivering a high quality service to its “guests”.

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Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1901

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by…

Abstract

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by the Act 29 Charles II., cap. 7, “for the better observation of the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday.” At first sight it would seem a palpable absurdity to suppose that a man could escape the penalties of one offence because he has committed another breach of the law at the same time, and in this respect law and common‐sense are, broadly speaking, in agreement; yet there are one or two cases in which at least some show of argument can be brought forward in favour of the opposite contention.

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British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Ashraf M. Salama

Whether in school buildings or university campuses the educational process involves many activities that include knowledge acquisition and assimilation, testing students'…

Abstract

Whether in school buildings or university campuses the educational process involves many activities that include knowledge acquisition and assimilation, testing students' motivation and academic performance, and faculty and teachers' productivity. The way in which we approach the planning, design, and our overall perception of learning environments makes powerful statements about how we view education; how educational buildings are designed tells us much about how teaching and learning activities occur. Concomitantly, how these activities are accommodated in a responsive educational environment is a critical issue that deserves special attention. While it was said several decades ago that a good teacher can teach anywhere, a growing body of knowledge-derived from knowledge on “evidence-based design” suggests a direct correlation between the physical aspects of the learning environment, teaching processes, and learning outcomes. In its commitment to introduce timely and pressing issues on built environment research, Open House International presents this special edition to debate and reflect on current discourses on sustainable learning environments.

Details

Open House International, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2010

Abstract

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Accounting Research Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 1998

P.C. Hughes and M.J. Maher

The traffic assignment problem aims to predict driver route choice, and is typically applied in the assessment of road schemes. The authors have previously published an SUE

Abstract

The traffic assignment problem aims to predict driver route choice, and is typically applied in the assessment of road schemes. The authors have previously published an SUE (Stochastic User Equilibrium) assignment algorithm, i.e. one which models variation in driver perception, and cost variation due to congestion. The algorithm works by minimising a function given by Sheffi and Powell (1982); in this paper the three terms of the function are investigated separately, and the possibility explored of constructing more sophisticated versions of the SUE algorithm.

Details

Mathematics in Transport Planning and Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-043430-8

Abstract

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Transportation and Traffic Theory in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-43926-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ray Travers and Sue Reeves

The Primrose Project has been developed, as part of the Dangerous People with Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) programme in England and Wales, to specifically address…

Abstract

The Primrose Project has been developed, as part of the Dangerous People with Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) programme in England and Wales, to specifically address the complex needs of women prisoners who pose a significant danger to the public. It has been recognised that the needs of these women prisoners may differ from those of men in the DSPD programme. The Primrose project therefore aims to deliver more effective prison‐based healthcare interventions to these dangerous women prisoners to reduce risk to self and others. The Primrose Project expects to initially support up to 12 women prisoners in HMP Low Newton, Durham. These women prisoners will be placed with other ‘non‐DSPD’ women prisoners in the prison and will receive a variety of therapeutic interventions. Overall, the Primrose Project aims to develop into a comprehensive assessment, treatment and management facility and the proposed evaluation aims to facilitate this development. The evaluation will look at the project as a whole, identifying strengths and limitations to overall improve the service for these women prisoners, who have not previously been provided for. The research is based on a list of comprehensive questions, which form the basis of evaluation of the existing four male DSPD sites in England and Wales, which will prove useful when comparisons are later made with the Primrose Project.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Elizabeth Wakely and Jerome Carson

Isaac Newton has been described as the father of modern science. What is less well known is that he had mental health problems. Here, the authors aim to review the…

Abstract

Purpose

Isaac Newton has been described as the father of modern science. What is less well known is that he had mental health problems. Here, the authors aim to review the literature on his problems and life to see if he was a mental health recovery hero.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviewed all the published papers on Newton's mental health problems, as well as many of the biographies written on him.

Findings

Scholars of Newton have focussed most of their attention on Newton's breakdown of 1693. This has been attributed to mercurialism or paranoid psychosis. The more likely explanation is depression or bipolar disorder. Personality factors are also critical in understanding Newton; he had a troubled upbringing and problems in relating to others. The latter enabled him to focus exclusively on his research and experiments and may have contributed to his greatness.

Originality/value

The authors have brought to bear their insights as a professional historian and as a clinical psychologist, giving this paper a unique perspective from previous uni‐disciplinary reviews.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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