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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Grant Michelson and V. Suchitra Mouly

This paper examines an important, albeit neglected aspect of communication in the workplace, namely, rumour and gossip in organisations. Drawing on literature from…

Abstract

This paper examines an important, albeit neglected aspect of communication in the workplace, namely, rumour and gossip in organisations. Drawing on literature from multiple disciplines the paper provides an analysis of the role played by rumour and gossip within organisations, including, but not limited to, its meaning, hidden reasons and its management. The paper discusses both antecedent and outcome variables that are associated with organisational rumour and gossip. It is contended that the different types of rumour and gossip serve different purposes which, in turn, result in a range of outcomes. Moreover, and in spite of the tendency to ascribe rumour and gossip as morally reprehensible, not all of these outcomes are shown to be harmful within organisations. The authors use this finding to argue that scholars and managers alike should avoid making negative judgements about rumour and gossip in all such cases.

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Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Michael Duncan, Suchitra Mouly and V. Nilakant

In a country that has experienced over 15 years of politically driven change, the New Zealand Police Service (NZP) is now in the midst of an ambitious change programme…

Abstract

In a country that has experienced over 15 years of politically driven change, the New Zealand Police Service (NZP) is now in the midst of an ambitious change programme called Policing 2000 (P2). Challenging traditional policing assumptions, P2 is a total quality management (TQM) approach that seeks alignment with an increasingly service orientated public by utilising state‐of‐the‐art technology and strategic management practices more akin to the private sector. Reports on an exploratory case study that investigated individual anticipatory reactions to organisational change. The findings provide insights into the factors necessary for the implementation of a discontinuous change programme; namely alignment of vision, culture and implementation.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Grant Michelson and Suchitra Mouly

Explores the issue of rumour and gossip in organisations. Given that rumour and gossip can break the harmony of the workplace unless well managed, it is rather surprising…

Abstract

Explores the issue of rumour and gossip in organisations. Given that rumour and gossip can break the harmony of the workplace unless well managed, it is rather surprising that they have not been sufficiently examined in management and organisational studies. In addition to providing an analysis of the role played by rumour and gossip within organisations, including, but not limited to, its origin, hidden reasons and its management, the role of gender is examined. Our research reveals that despite the commonly‐held and entrenched view that women are largely responsible for instigating and perpetuating organisational rumour and gossip, a review of the evidence fails to support this claim.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Thomas Hamilton Forster and V. Suchitra Mouly

The purpose of this paper is to study the privatisation process and its impact on organisational change in the electricity industry in the Gambia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the privatisation process and its impact on organisational change in the electricity industry in the Gambia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used for the study as qualitative techniques make use of a holistic approach, which allows for the assembling of a comprehensive and complete picture of the process under investigation.

Findings

The findings from the research suggest that change processes that are endogenous are more likely to achieve their desired objectives when compared to exogenous changes.

Research limitations/implications

The study suggests that there is a relationship between the locus of change and the level of trust associated with the drivers of change. Future research on privatisation could make a significant contribution if focussed on the social processes of privatisation.

Practical implications

The study shows that privatisation will only occur if all interests become associated with a reformative pattern of value commitment. A normative vision made up of ideas, beliefs, and values that shape prevailing conceptions must be present to support the process.

Originality/value

Research has shown that most changes carried out in less developed countries (LDCs) under the auspices of the WB/IMF, have not achieved the desired outcomes. This study has shown that the initiation and control of reform from outside affects the outcomes of the change programme. It is therefore imperative for funding agencies to concentrate on providing assistance to enable LDCs design control and implement their own changes rather than the funding agencies taking control of this aspect of reform.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Margaret Meskill, Suchitra Mouly and Stephen Dakin

The focus of this paper is on the recognition and resolution by managers of “disturbances”, which have been defined as “involuntary situations that threaten the smooth…

Abstract

The focus of this paper is on the recognition and resolution by managers of “disturbances”, which have been defined as “involuntary situations that threaten the smooth running of the organisation but are partially beyond managerial control”. We have employed a case‐study methodology that involved semi‐structured interviews, and both within‐ and cross‐case analysis of interview data. Our primary finding is that disturbances are either people‐oriented or systems‐related, and that both recognition and resolution are contingent upon the nature of the disturbance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Amelia C. Smith and V. Suchitra Mouly

Using a qualitative methodology, the present research attempts to understand members’ perceptions of empowerment in two New Zealand organizations that have undergone…

Abstract

Using a qualitative methodology, the present research attempts to understand members’ perceptions of empowerment in two New Zealand organizations that have undergone various reforms in the workplace. In a departure from the literature, our study reveals the context‐specific nature of empowerment and offers probable reasons for the lack of a unified (or universal) definition. From our case data, we also identify several factors that either facilitate or inhibit the empowerment process, and that have significant implications for organizations seeking to empower their employees.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Peter Wyer and Jane Mason

The concept of empowerment has received a great deal of attention in recent years. However, the empowerment knowledge base is predominantly large company‐oriented with…

Abstract

The concept of empowerment has received a great deal of attention in recent years. However, the empowerment knowledge base is predominantly large company‐oriented with little evidence of understanding what empowerment means in a small business context. It is inappropriate to treat the small firm as a microcosm of a large organisation. The small business is qualitatively as well as quantitatively different and this article propounds that it is questionable whether the concept of empowerment and its various dimensions as portrayed in the literature are readily transferable to small businesses. It is suggested that empowering management approaches are key features of successful growth‐oriented small firms but the current body of empowerment literature fails to encapsulate the idiosyncrasies and informalities of the small business operation, and thus convey understanding of the unique and novel forms of empowerment which facilitate sustainable development. Case study insight is used to support these propositions.

Details

Participation and Empowerment: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-4449

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