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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Krisna Damayanti and Lydia Setyawardani

This study aims to determine the factors that encourage Indonesian banks to collaborate in the banking networks ATM Prima and ATM Bersama to achieve business efficiencies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the factors that encourage Indonesian banks to collaborate in the banking networks ATM Prima and ATM Bersama to achieve business efficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of methods is used to collect both qualitative and quantitative data. Factor analysis and different testing technics are used. The data were obtained through interviews with managers of the banks involved in the two banking networks included in this study.

Findings

This research addresses ATM banking from three perspectives: banks that collaborate in ATM networks, banks that are joint ATM providers and banking customers that use ATMs. The results show that the banks in the study are more concerned about cost-effectiveness and cost-efficiencies in both the operational and investment aspects of supporting their ATM infrastructures. ATM providers place more importance on creating the most user-friendly, stable, wide-ranging and continuous system of services by collaborating with other banks in networks that provide ATM services. Customers put more importance on paying the minimum possible administration fees and the availability of specific banking services across a wide area.

Research limitations/implications

This research took place over a period of only one year. This limited the depth of the data collected. A longer study using data that cover more than one fiscal year would have generated more detailed information.

Practical implications

This study places importance on maximizing cost-efficiencies to keep bank fees low for customers. There are significant investment and operational costs associated with setting up and operating ATMs and of adding and managing additional ATMs. This is particularly so in an era when their use is on the decline owing to the increasing use of electronic banking.

Social implications

The social implications of ATM banking refer to the reduced administration fees customers pay as banks incur cost savings from collaborating on infrastructure and services. The availability of ATMs from specific banks could be replaced by one joint ATM machine that is situated in a specific area where electronic banking is not available. Banks’ customers tend to move to other banking services, and this means banks could lose a lot of their existing customers unless they can come up with unique services that are both accessible and user-friendly.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is that it recommends that some strategies Indonesian banks could use to become more efficient and effective, including forming ATM alliances to maximize efficiency and to achieve a competitive advantage.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Adesegun Oyedele and Fuat Firat

The purpose of this paper is to respond to the call of international marketing professionals for more studies on strategies that firms use in response to the complexities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to respond to the call of international marketing professionals for more studies on strategies that firms use in response to the complexities of interacting with other institutions in the emerging markets (EMs) of sub-Saharan Africa. The key research question investigated by employing the exploratory qualitative data gathered is: What strategies and global alliances do small local firms (SLFs) in Nigeria adopt to succeed under complex market conditions?

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is exploratory qualitative research. The authors conducted extended interviews to generate rich case study data from the top management of the selected SLFs in Nigeria. The interview data were assessed using open, axial and selective coding to uncover macro-narratives that guide SLFs’ strategies and global alliances.

Findings

The macro-narratives derived from the qualitative case analysis reveal a theoretical framework centered on three major elements of competitive strategies in Nigeria: build global capacity and strategic alliances from the get-go; develop local strategic alliances; master matching alliance partners’ needs to create innovative payment plans and, when necessary, shift the transaction cost burden to alliance partners. Matching theory rather than traditional network theories is better at explicating SLFs’ alliances in Nigeria. Implementation of these strategies requires flexible strategic initiatives.

Originality/value

The study adapts institutional interaction theory, network theory, matching alliance perspective, trade credit theories and the literature on small firms’ strategies in EMs to explicate successful small local firm strategies and global alliances under complex market conditions in Nigeria. The recognition that SLFs regularly migrate and shift the burden of transactions’ cost to multiple stakeholders in the supply network by matching customers and supplier needs is important. The discovery of matching theory in explicating SLFs’ global alliances in Nigeria is unique to this study.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Gary Stach

Eli Lilly's director of alliance management tells how the company has learned to make a success of its partnership strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

Eli Lilly's director of alliance management tells how the company has learned to make a success of its partnership strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The author describes best practices and key principles.

Findings

The Lilly process has proven successfulof the last six products the firm has launched, four are promoted with a partner.

Practical implications

Lilly has developed a “three‐dimensional fit” analysis that helps the firm identify elements of strategic fit, cultural fit and operational fit between Lilly and a partner company.

Originality/value

Lilly describes how the elements of their alliance program increase the likelihood of success for individual partnerships and how a continuous learning process contributes to the success of future alliances.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Khai Sheang Lee, Guan Hua Lim and Jiuan Tan

Although the benefits of strategic alliances are well documented, whether strategic alliances can be a viable entry strategy option for small and medium‐size enterprises…

Abstract

Although the benefits of strategic alliances are well documented, whether strategic alliances can be a viable entry strategy option for small and medium‐size enterprises (SMEs) to successfully penetrate markets held by major incumbent suppliers is less clear. In this paper, strategic alliances are shown to be an effective entry‐cum‐deterrence strategy for SMEs to successfully penetrate markets that are well established and dominated by major corporations. In addition, the conditions under which SMEs can use strategic alliances as an entry strategy without restricting themselves to target only those markets ignored by bigger firms are identified. In terms of methodology, this paper follows a deductive approach – one based on game theory, to examine explicitly the reactions of bigger firms to the entry of SMEs into their markets, specifically taking into account the resource limitations faced by SMEs. To verify that the theoretical arguments presented are consistent with practice, two cases of the use of strategic alliances by SMEs as an entry strategy to penetrate markets dominated by major corporations are examined. The practices and experiences of these SMEs were found to be consistent with the theoretical arguments presented here.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Patricia Anslinger and Justin Jenk

CEOs are increasingly turning to alliances as a way to grow their business and maximize shareholder value. They are searching for growth strategies while confronting a…

Abstract

CEOs are increasingly turning to alliances as a way to grow their business and maximize shareholder value. They are searching for growth strategies while confronting a host of new forces that include intensified competition, rapid technology advances, upstream innovation and rising development costs. These forces tend to push corporations out of their comfort zones and contribute to disappointing success rates. Alliances are different from other structural transactions, such as a mergers or acquisitions, and need to be managed differently. To begin with, alliances are larger, messier to manage and somewhat open‐ended in terms of their duration and focus. They are an ongoing activity, often run as a distinct business operation. To obtain specific business objectives, such as getting products to market faster, these newer kinds of alliances are taking nontraditional forms. Accenture has identified five forms, including “invasive relationships” where significant amounts of technology and personnel are shared, or “multifunction” where different core functions are shared toward a common objective. We have found that companies can achieve high performance in alliances by focusing on six factors described in this article.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Dean Elmuti and Yunus Kathawala

Strategic alliances can be effective ways to diffuse new technologies rapidly, to enter a new market, to bypass governmental restrictions expeditiously, and to learn…

Abstract

Strategic alliances can be effective ways to diffuse new technologies rapidly, to enter a new market, to bypass governmental restrictions expeditiously, and to learn quickly from the leading firms in a given field. However, strategic alliances are not simple or easy to create, develop, and support. Strategic alliances projects often fail because of tactical errors made by management. By using a well managed strategic alliances agreement, companies can gain in markets that would otherwise be uneconomical. Considerable time and energy must be put forth by all involved in order to create a successful alliance. It is essential that corporations enter into strategic alliances arrangements with a comprehensive plan outlining detailed expectations, requirements, and expected benefits.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

William Reinfeld

Strategic Alliances (SAs) have become widely used by global businesses for pursuing strategic goals.1 Because of the special nuances that can make these kinds of joint…

Abstract

Strategic Alliances (SAs) have become widely used by global businesses for pursuing strategic goals.1 Because of the special nuances that can make these kinds of joint ventures (JVs) effective means for achieving challenging strategic goals, they are generally more difficult to establish and manage. Some of the larger, more successful users of SAs recognize the special nature of these relationships and some such as Cisco and Pfizer have even created high-level divisions or departments in their organization explicitly focused on planning, pursuing, and managing outside strategic partnerships. These units not only monitor the alliances (in some cases, dozens at a time) but also develop tools and insights that will allow the organization to engage in SA more successfully.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-256-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Evelyne Vanpoucke, Kenneth K. Boyer and Ann Vereecke

The purpose of this paper is to identify different information flow strategies to enhance integration in strategic alliances and studies these strategies with respect to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify different information flow strategies to enhance integration in strategic alliances and studies these strategies with respect to contextual factors and the impact on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines empirical data gathered from 56 manufacturing companies, describing 112 supply chain relationships. An empirical taxonomy is created based on cluster analysis.

Findings

Based on a parsimonious description of inter‐firm information flows in the literature and this paper's empirical findings, three types of alliances are identified: Silent; Communicative; and IT intensive. While Silent alliances have the poorest overall performance, substantial similarities are found between Communicative and IT intensive alliances. In particular, the analysis suggests that IT intensive alliances, albeit performing better on operational capabilities, are not performing better on relationship satisfaction compared to Communicative alliances. Additional analyses indicate that partners of an IT intensive alliance are substantially more interdependent and larger in size.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents a taxonomy of information flow strategies in a supply chain context. This research is not describing causality, since the data are not longitudinal in nature.

Practical implications

Managers need to selectively invest in IT according to an overall supply chain integration strategy, which also takes softer, less technological forms of integration into consideration.

Originality/value

This research provides insight into inter‐firm information flows from a contingency perspective, recognizing heterogeneity of firms and supply chain practices.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

T.K. Das and Rajesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is propose a strategic framework for understanding interpartner negotiation dynamics in alliances.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is propose a strategic framework for understanding interpartner negotiation dynamics in alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors define interpartner negotiations as a process of reconciling and integrating the interests of the partners in an alliance, and consider four types of interpartner negotiation strategies – problem solving, contending, yielding, and compromising – and then discuss the dynamics of these negotiation strategies in the formation, operation, and outcome stages of alliance development.

Findings

The framework makes clear that the four types of interpartner negotiation strategies identified in the article need to be appreciated as having differential impact at each stage of alliance development.

Research limitations/implications

As interpartner negotiations occur at all stages of alliance evolution, future research may seek to empirically assess the impact of different interpartner negotiation strategies.

Practical implications

The paper discusses how alliance managers can deploy effective interpartner negotiation strategies for achieving alliance objectives at each of the three developmental stages.

Originality/value

The article responds to the need of managers with alliance responsibilities for a framework to help identify and exploit the most effective ways to conduct interpartner negotiations in alliances for productive interactions at different alliance development stages.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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