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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Scott Edgett and Kim Snow

Addresses the issue of measuring the success of new products in a service environment by examining a number of measures under the three broad categories of customer…

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2913

Abstract

Addresses the issue of measuring the success of new products in a service environment by examining a number of measures under the three broad categories of customer satisfaction, quality and performance. Reports on the perceived effectiveness of different measurement approaches by benchmarking techniques currently in use in the financial services industry, by determining how informative management finds them, by isolating measurement approaches which are the most useful, and by identifying measurement approaches which are still needed. Confirms that service companies continue to employ many traditional success/failure measures, but that these are gradually being supplemented with new tools as executives begin to realize that strict profitability criteria are no longer enough to gauge the real success of service offerings.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Godson A. Tetteh, Kwasi Amoako-Gyampah and Amoako Kwarteng

Several research studies on Lean Six Sigma (LSS) have been done using the survey methodology. However, the use of surveys often relies on the measurement of variables…

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151

Abstract

Purpose

Several research studies on Lean Six Sigma (LSS) have been done using the survey methodology. However, the use of surveys often relies on the measurement of variables, which cannot be directly observed, with attendant measurement errors. The purpose of this study is to develop a methodological framework consisting of a combination of four tools for identifying and assessing measurement error during survey research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluated the viability of the framework through an experimental study on the assessment of project management success in a developing country environment. The research design combined a control group, pretest and post-test measurements with structural equation modeling that enabled the assessment of differences between honest and fake survey responses. This paper tested for common method variance (CMV) using the chi-square test for the difference between unconstrained and fully constrained models.

Findings

The CMV results confirmed that there was significant shared variance among the different measures allowing us to distinguish between trait and faking responses and ascertain how much of the observed process measurement is because of measurement system variation as opposed to variation arising from the study’s constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one country, and hence, the results may not be generalizable.

Originality/value

Measurement error during survey research, if not properly addressed, can lead to incorrect conclusions that can harm theory development. It can also lead to inappropriate recommendations for practicing managers. This study provides findings from a framework developed and assessed in a LSS project environment for identifying faking responses. This paper provides a robust framework consisting of four tools that provide guidelines on distinguishing between fake and trait responses. This tool should be of great value to researchers.

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2014

Marc J. Epstein

While management control and performance measurement research and practices have advanced significantly in the last decades, the research and applications to social…

Abstract

Purpose

While management control and performance measurement research and practices have advanced significantly in the last decades, the research and applications to social impacts and social purpose organizations are underdeveloped. This chapter reports on three research studies that have important implications for future research and practice in the use of management control and performance measurement to solve global societal challenges.

Approach

This chapter provides new frameworks and performance measurement approaches used in three recent series of research projects. It also provides the results of this extensive research in using existing theories and managerial practices to improve success and the measurement of success in for-profit and nonprofit organizations that are focused on increasing their positive social impacts.

Findings

This research that spans more than 20 years and includes numerous projects and research methods in many countries has discovered a prior lack of application of existing theories, approaches, tools, and measures that are fundamental to management control and performance measurement. It found that much work is still needed in both academic research and managerial practices to apply them effectively in social purpose organizations and suggests areas for future research.

Originality

By reviewing the literature comprehensively and doing a series of related research projects, this analysis provides a foundation for future research in the applicability of management control and performance measurement approaches to the measurement and improvement of the social impacts of both for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Behavioral Implications and Human Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-378-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Aki Jääskeläinen and Virpi Sillanpää

The paper aims to evaluate factors affecting the success of the measurement system implementation in the context of two case services with a specific measurement object  

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1967

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to evaluate factors affecting the success of the measurement system implementation in the context of two case services with a specific measurement object – productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with the users of new measurement systems are used to obtain information on the role of known technical and organizational success factors supporting measurement system implementation.

Findings

Two key factors were found to affect the success of the measurement system development project. First, the commitment of the operative level was achieved. Second, the chosen measurement tool was suitable for the identified managerial requirements of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

In order to improve external validity, it would be useful to assess the implementation of measurement systems with a similar approach in different organizations. Could the positive results described in this study be replicated?

Practical implications

The practical implications of this study are twofold. First, the study describes a potential and fresh approach towards measurement of performance and productivity in public organizations. Second, the experiences described can assist public managers to avoid pitfalls in the implementation of measurement systems.

Originality/value

Various challenges in developing measurement systems in the public sector context are well studied. It is important to better understand how to overcome the problems. In comparison to many existing studies, this research provides more specific and detailed knowledge related to a successful development project.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Caroline Fisher, Michael M. Pearson, Jerry R. Goolsby and Marina H. Onken

Previous studies of musical group performance have suggested the need for reliable and valid measures of success. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

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1280

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies of musical group performance have suggested the need for reliable and valid measures of success. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Nunnally's methodology, this study developed 18 items that might indicate relative success of performing musical groups. These items were administered to 338 musical groups from Louisiana.

Findings

Significant correlations were found among most of the measures. Factor analysis yielded two distinct success scales, one objective and one subjective scale.

Research limitations/implication

While this study sampled only Louisiana‐based musical groups, the formulated scales provide a needed basis for success measurement in research on performing groups, such as musical groups, theater companies, dance and other group performance companies.

Practical implications

A musical group could track their objective measures over time to determine the group's continual improvement. Subjective items could be gathered using a questionnaire given to the band members on a regular basis. Decreases in subjective ratings would indicate decreasing satisfaction among group members, and would alert the band that changes might need to be made.

Originality/value

Research on performing service groups, such as musical groups, is often limited because of lack of accepted measures for the dependent variable of success. This research study has developed two success scales that can help measure success in these groups. The authors suggest that future research could use these success scales and the criteria of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Awards Program to better research the marketing and management of performing service groups.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Josef Blasini and Susanne Leist

Although process performance management (PPM), doubtlessly contributes to the increase of business performance, it has been given only little attention to date. The…

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6244

Abstract

Purpose

Although process performance management (PPM), doubtlessly contributes to the increase of business performance, it has been given only little attention to date. The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of what constitutes successful PPM and to identify critical success factors in PPM.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two complementary literature reviews – a representative literature review to get an overview of possible success factors, and an extended literature review to identify detailed success factor items. To increase the reliability of the success factors, a multiple case‐study was additionally conducted.

Findings

In the first literature review – the representative one – 11 success factors of PPM were identified, to which several detailed PPM success factor items could be identified in the extended literature review. Obviously, the success factor “information quality” is much more mentioned in literature than factors regarding “process quality” or “system quality”.

Research limitations/implications

Since there are no standardized terms regarding PPM, it is challenging to include all important papers into the literature review. The next steps to develop a PPM success model are to conceptualize a structural equation model and to conduct a worldwide online‐survey.

Practical implications

The findings of this research serve as a basis for a PPM success model, which enables practitioners to focus on what is really important for successful PPM.

Originality/value

The application of a multi‐methodological research approach resulted in success factors whose importance was evaluated by their frequency of occurrence in literature, as well as by experts in real‐life enterprises.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Udechukwu Ojiako, Eric Johansen and David Greenwood

Failure is encountered regularly within project‐based industries and there has been research for decades into this phenomenon. Much of it has considered the failure of…

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4294

Abstract

Purpose

Failure is encountered regularly within project‐based industries and there has been research for decades into this phenomenon. Much of it has considered the failure of projects in terms of the classic project progress issues such as time, cost and quality. Using cases from two major industries the authors aim to develop a different understanding of project measurement criteria. This work is part of a larger completed investigation into information systems and information technology (IS/IT) project management models, developed for industry comparisons.

Design/methodology/approach

During the study, the concept of project failure and success is investigated. The authors carry out a UK‐based, grounded study of two project‐based industries of differing maturity levels (construction and IS/IT) to investigate measures of project failure or success across the two industries.

Findings

The paper presents a reassessment of project measurement criteria. This is based on the separation of measures for project performance and project progress.

Research limitations/implications

The adopted strategy of naturalistic inquiry has always been susceptible to the criticism that it relies too much on subjective interpretation of data. In addition, no clear relationship was established between the factors discussed and the criteria for measuring project success.

Originality/value

The paper discusses current differences in perception of what actually constitutes a failed or successful project. The paper highlights that often two different (but closely related) concepts, are being discussed by project stakeholders.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Mike Simpson, Joanne Padmore and Nicki Newman

The purpose of this study is to develop an academic theoretical framework relating success and performance in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) so that future…

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4702

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an academic theoretical framework relating success and performance in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) so that future research could be carried out to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) for SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a literature review, in‐depth interviews with owner‐managers of SMEs and a knowledge elicitation exercise was carried out based on the experience of the researchers and on the interviews with owner‐managers.

Findings

A new academic conceptual model was developed linking CSFs, definitions of success and performance to the characteristics of the business environment, the characteristics of the owner‐manager and the characteristics of the business. The relatively new idea that feedback on performance in the model could modify the strategic/tactical behaviour of the SME owner‐managers was introduced.

Research limitations/implications

The many research problems posed by performance studies aimed at establishing CSFs in SMEs are still present in the current framework but a longitudinal research methodology could be employed to avoid these problems in future research.

Practical implications

The theoretical framework offers a different way forward for both practitioners and business advisors in thinking about those factors that may be critical for success in SMEs.

Originality/value

This is a new framework that can be used to inform thinking and research design in the area of performance measurement and success.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1992

Mohamed Zairi

Based on a research project looking at user‐supplier interactionsin the context of AMT, attempts to discuss an alternative to themeasurement of success, based on a close…

Abstract

Based on a research project looking at user‐supplier interactions in the context of AMT, attempts to discuss an alternative to the measurement of success, based on a close scrutiny of user‐supplier interaction processes. Closely examines a variety of factors which are both internal and external in nature. Presents some key factors which have been identified as facilitators or inhibitors for the implementation of AMT and also draws some comparisons with key findings from other studies and in similar areas of research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2021

Sahar Jawad and Ann Ledwith

The purpose of this paper is to presents a new modeling approach that provides a measurement tool for evaluating the effectiveness of Project Control Systems (PCS) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to presents a new modeling approach that provides a measurement tool for evaluating the effectiveness of Project Control Systems (PCS) and the improvement of the project control capability as a part of an organization's project management processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a project management maturity approach to develop a measurement model of PCS success. The key elements in this model have been identified using the Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP) method to analyze data from a case study involving contractor companies in Saudi's petroleum and chemical industry.

Findings

The results identified six critical elements for PCS success: (1) Change Management, (2) Earned Value, (3) Baselined Plan, (4) Resource Loaded, (5) Progress Method and (6) Governance Program. In addition, Project Forecasting and Corrective Action Verification were identified as the main areas where clients and contractors need to focus for the effective deployment of a PCS.

Practical implications

The results of this study were used to create a PCS Maturity Model (PCSMM) and a PCS Success Index (PCSSI). The value of this index can help project managers to identify the maturity level of their PCS and improvement areas that lead to enhanced project performance.

Originality/value

This research presents an alternative maturity model for PCS assessment that provides a practical tool to identify areas for improving the critical elements of PCS success. The study draws a clear distinction between overall project success and the success of the PCS.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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1 – 10 of over 66000