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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Mostafa Jazayeri, Danture Wickramsinghe and Tharusha Gooneratne

The purpose of this paper is to report on two institutional change scenarios of performance measurement (PM) systems, namely, subversion and integration. Subversion

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on two institutional change scenarios of performance measurement (PM) systems, namely, subversion and integration. Subversion represents insiders' use of existing institutional logic whereas integration represents insiders' use of imported institutional logic.

Design/methodology/approach

The scenarios are drawn from two case studies: BAE Systems (a large UK manufacturing company) and Alpha (a medium‐sized Sri Lankan manufacturing company). The data were collected through in‐depth interviews and documentary sources.

Findings

An internal “culture change programme” led to a business value scorecard (BVS) in BAE Systems, and an external knowledge diffusion programme gave rise to a balanced scorecard (BSC) in Alpha. The culture change programme was facilitated by a particular institutional logic resulting in a successful BVS practice. In contrast, at Alpha, the BSC project was externally imposed, although it was designed with the blessing of the owner‐manager. This triggered internal controversies and the workforce became unreceptive. Consequently, attention was diverted to other management fads such as total quality management, Six Sigma, and enterprise resource planning but these were also short lived.

Research limitations/implications

While this paper provides evidence on practice variation and adds to neoinstitutional‐based management accounting research, the empirical materials, however, did not allow the authors to trace all four scenarios in the typology.

Practical implications

PM systems, such as the BSC, seem to be malleable and adaptable to local requirements subject to organisational and managerial flexibility and democratic possibilities.

Originality/value

This research highlights how the institutional environment is fragmented and contested, in different organisational and political conditions and spaces, resulting in variation in practices.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2016

Jaya Gajparia

Historically, as a result of complex intersections of marginalisation, women and girls in India are known to have had less access to economic and social capital than men…

Abstract

Purpose

Historically, as a result of complex intersections of marginalisation, women and girls in India are known to have had less access to economic and social capital than men and boys. Progress on poverty alleviation and the advancement of women’s and girls’ development continues to be slow and has even been described as ‘regressive’ (UN Women, 2015). This chapter provides a microanalysis of experiences and perceptions of gender and poverty in Mumbai, India. It puts forward new insights into everyday forms of agency, resistance and subversion while confronting western centric ideas around development and colonialist notions of victimhood.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon research conducted in 2012–2013, the qualitative study adopting a multi-methods approach draws on participatory action research, participant observation and ethnography. This chapter draws on a small number of interviews from the original sample of 40 participants.

Research implications/limitations

This chapter is based on findings from a small research sample.

Findings

The study finds evidence that confirms experiences of gendered poverty permeate across class divides, suggesting that access to economic capital does not necessarily result in equitable gender relations. The findings also uncover the diverse ways in which women and adolescent girls strategise and negotiate to acquire agency, through acts of resistance and/or subversion.

Originality/value

There are two key aspects of this research that can be considered original: the use of a multi-methods approach and by bringing together of a combination of different voices. The theoretical and sociological contribution of this research lies in showcasing the value of expanding the definition of poverty and gender beyond a purely economic analysis.

Details

Gender and Race Matter: Global Perspectives on Being a Woman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-037-4

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Amanda DiGioia and Charlotte Naylor Davis

This chapter focuses on the problematic relationship between heavy metal and gender politics. While metal may be deemed as being an ‘alternative’ subculture, metal still…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the problematic relationship between heavy metal and gender politics. While metal may be deemed as being an ‘alternative’ subculture, metal still ‘uses’ women in the same way as ‘normal’ society. Despite the nature of metal as counterculture, women’s images and morality are often inverted but not subverted and it is this nuance that we wish to explore: for example, the use of Mary, Mother of God, in ‘Amen’ by black metal band Behemoth, where though her image is a challenge to convention, she is still ‘used’ as emblems for male political ideology. In the textuality of heavy metal music, women appear as mothers (both good and bad), fetishised whores, mother earth and sexualised virgins. Where modern open sexuality is ‘praised’, anything less so is mocked. Though this ‘praise’ may come across as positive, it is nevertheless still ascribing morality/immorality/virtue to women’s bodies in a way that is not done with men. In this discussion, we will use examples of texts from metal bands who reference women, imagery associated with band merchandise as well as comments from the performers themselves (such as Dee Snider’s approval of the lyrics of ‘We’re Not Gonna Take It’ being associated with the Women’s March on Washington) to investigate the place of the female body in this cultural representation. By using textual critical analysis, we show that women in metal are still having morality written on their bodies, bringing to light the debatable nature of metal being deemed as ‘alternative’ when it comes to gender.

Details

Subcultures, Bodies and Spaces: Essays on Alternativity and Marginalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-512-8

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Punk, Gender and Ageing: Just Typical Girls?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-568-2

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Executive summary
Publication date: 30 July 2020

BELARUS: 'Subversion' claims add to poll uncertainties

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES254252

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Robert M. Davison and Carol X.J. Ou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how selected employees in China deliberately subvert organizational information systems (IS) policy by developing feral working…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how selected employees in China deliberately subvert organizational information systems (IS) policy by developing feral working practices in order to gain access to the applications that they believe essential to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretive case study.

Findings

Employees cannot accept the limited IT policy/environment imposed by corporate management and develop their own workarounds that subvert the organizational IT policy so as to ensure that they can get work done.

Research limitations/implications

The authors draw on elements of punctuated equilibrium theory to conceptualize the findings into four theoretical propositions. The authors encourage researchers to probe these organizational practices and solutions in depth.

Practical implications

Organizations cannot expect their digital native employees to leave their social media culture at home when they come to work. Social media penetrates all aspects of their lives and in all locations. Therefore, organizations must find a way to permit its use at work.

Originality/value

Subversion is a topic rarely studied in IS research, or in business/management more generally. The focus on the subversive behavior of organizational employees is original and important. The authors suggest that subversive behavior may be more common than the limited literature suggests.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Emphasises the global nature of the challenges posed by terrorism, economic crime and subversion; because of this, national law enforcement needs to be aided by regional…

Abstract

Emphasises the global nature of the challenges posed by terrorism, economic crime and subversion; because of this, national law enforcement needs to be aided by regional and international agreements. Mentions the UK’s Crime (International Cooperation) Bill, which will make it easier to investigate and prosecute cross‐border criminal activity. Rejects the notion that economic crime is somehow less harmful than other crime because it does not harm people; this is not true because economic crime finances terrorism. Reports that white‐collar criminals often receive unduly lenient sentences, which the author, who is Her Majesty’s Attorney General, has the power to refer for review to the Court of Appeal. Outlines other measures that the UK is adopting to fight economic crime.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Hounaida El Jurdi and Sandra Smith

This research aims to draw on social identity theory (SIT) and social comparison theory (SCT) to examine how social and cultural contexts influence the construction and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to draw on social identity theory (SIT) and social comparison theory (SCT) to examine how social and cultural contexts influence the construction and pursuit of beauty ideals.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixteen Lebanese women aged between 18 and 45, from a range of backgrounds, were recruited for the purpose of this research. Interview questions probed the respondents’ female beauty ideals in relation to themselves and others. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate and enrich each discussion.

Findings

The pursuit of beauty involves rich processes and is motivated by the search for an authentic self. Participants construct and pursue beauty ideals by mirroring views of their national identity through conformity, identification and subversion.

Practical implications

The pursuit of beauty is influenced not only by global media and celebrity culture but also by how respondents conceptualize their national identity. Beauty consumption serves two opposing functions in identity construction: social membership and distinction. Beauty, like fashion, serves as an indicator of taste that simultaneously includes the singularity and subjectivity of individual tastes.

Originality/value

This study extends research on the pursuit and consumption of beauty in several ways: it is situated in a non-western cultural context, it illustrates the usefulness of SCT and SIT in understanding beauty consumption and it highlights the role of mirroring processes in identity construction and beauty consumptive practices.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

Can the considerate side of human nature play a greater part in combating selfish and ruthless behaviour at work? Or is this being “unrealistic” and naive? Canon Peter…

Abstract

Can the considerate side of human nature play a greater part in combating selfish and ruthless behaviour at work? Or is this being “unrealistic” and naive? Canon Peter Challen believes that co‐operation must replace competition if an orderly industrial society is to be achieved, and advocates “open subversion” of practices which individuals and organisations feel to be wrong. Monica Porter talks to Canon Challen and looks at the work carried out by Industrial Missions.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 79 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Navan Nadrajan Govender

In this article, the author draws on Janks’ territory beyond reason as well as literature on (critically) reflective writing. The purpose of this paper is to explore how a…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the author draws on Janks’ territory beyond reason as well as literature on (critically) reflective writing. The purpose of this paper is to explore how a space for personal, affective writing in the classroom might enable teachers, students and learners to 1) come to terms with gender as a social practice, 2) locate themselves in the relations of power, marginalisation and subversion being explored and 3) negotiate the internal contradictions that come with personal and social transformation. The author presents and unpacks how second-year undergraduate Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) students at a prominent university in Johannesburg, South Africa, unpacked issues of gender and sexual diversity in a critical literacy course. This paper focuses on students’ completion of a reflective writing task but is situated in a broader study on critical literacy and gender and sexual diversity. The findings suggest the need for sustained critically reflective writing in the classroom and continued research on critical literacy as both a rationalist and affective project. Furthermore, the findings suggest ways in which critically reflective writing was used to create a space where students could place themselves into the content and relations of power being studied and identify and unpack the ways in which discourses of power have informed their own identities over time, with the intent to develop the capacity to position themselves in more socially conscious ways. This study, therefore, illustrates only a fraction of how students might use reflective writing to come to terms with controversial topics, place themselves in the systems of power, explore marginalisation or subversion and negotiate the internal contradictions of transformation. However, the data also suggest that there is potential for this practice to have a greater role in classroom practice, a deeper effect on learners’ understanding of self and society and further research on the impact of critical reflection in the classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the author presents and unpacks how second-year undergraduate B.Ed. students at a prominent university in Johannesburg, South Africa, unpacked issues of gender and sexual diversity through reflective writing in a critical literacy course.

Findings

The findings suggest the need for sustained critically reflective writing in the classroom and continued research in critical literacy as both a rationalist and affective project. The students who participated in this research revealed the ways in which critically reflective writing might be used to create a space where students place themselves into the content and relations of power being studied, identify and unpack the ways in which discourses of power have informed their own identities over time, and, perhaps, develop the capacity to position themselves in more socially conscious ways.

Research limitations/implications

While the findings reveal the need for continued practice and research in the territories beyond a rationalist critical literacy, they are based on a small data set in a single context.

Practical implications

Findings from the analysis of the data suggest that there is potential for critically reflective writing to have a greater role in classroom practice, a deeper effect on learners’ understanding of self and society and further research on the impact of critically reflective writing in the classroom. Perhaps a sustained practice of critically reflective writing is what is needed, as well as processes of self and peer evaluations that put that writing up for critical analysis.

Social implications

There is scope for further, long-term research in the role of critically reflective writing, critical literacy classrooms and the territory beyond reason across social issues and educational contexts. Existing resources on critically reflective writing are vital for imagining what this prolonged practice might look like in classrooms (Ryan and Ryan, 2013; Lui, 2015; Pennell, 2019).

Originality/value

The data presented here are limited and illustrate only a fraction of how students might use reflective writing to come to terms with controversial topics, place themselves in the systems of power/marginalisation/subordination/subversion being explored and negotiate the internal contradictions of transformation. However, these data also suggest that there is potential for this practice to have a greater role in classroom practice, a deeper effect on learners’ understanding of self and society and further research on the impact of critical reflexivity in the classroom.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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