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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Ayman Hamdan Mansour, Jumana H. Shehadeh and Laith A. Hamdan Mansour

This paper aims to evaluate effectiveness of cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) to prevent substance use among first-year university students at high risk of substance use.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate effectiveness of cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) to prevent substance use among first-year university students at high risk of substance use.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixty university students at high risk for substance use recruited and assigned to CBI and control groups (30 students per groups). Intervention impact was assessed on measures of attitudes toward substance use at three time points: baseline, postintervention and three-months postintervention.

Findings

The analysis showed that participants’ negative attitudes toward substance use in the intervention group was increased post intervention. Although the mean score was significantly higher than the baseline (Time I) at Time II and dropped at Time III, the mean scores remained higher than time I, using repeated measure ANOVA (p < 0.05).

Practical implications

Findings of this study provide evidence that CBI is effective to sustain substance abstinence among this age group.

Originality/value

The paper is testing effectiveness CBI among a high-risk population of substance use. The study is highlighting the importance of sustaining substance abstinence using psychological preventive methods.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Rossi Owen, Paul Hughes, Catherine Baker and Laurence Chesterman

Individuals diagnosed with severe mental illness have higher rates of alcohol and substance misuse than the general population. This can present the client and the care…

Abstract

Individuals diagnosed with severe mental illness have higher rates of alcohol and substance misuse than the general population. This can present the client and the care team with a variety of issues around physical and psychological well‐being, as well as social and occupational functioning. In forensic psychiatry, the effect of comorbid substance misuse on offending behaviour is particularly pertinent. There have, however, been few studies examining the treatment of alcohol and substance misuse within this particular patient group.At a regional secure unit in North Wales, a group for inpatients was set up to provide education on alcohol and substance misuse over a course of six informal meetings, and to then evaluate participants' attitudes towards substance misuse. Of the six participants, five reported that their knowledge of substances had increased, and that they had no intention to use drugs again after discharge. Staff and client participants also suggested useful future topics for the group.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Andrew Derry and Amy Batson

Although a majority of mentally disordered offenders have substance use problems (Wright et al, 2002), as yet there have been few attempts to understand the human and…

Abstract

Although a majority of mentally disordered offenders have substance use problems (Wright et al, 2002), as yet there have been few attempts to understand the human and financial cost of this problem in forensic mental health services. The current study examined the effect of a drugs and alcohol programme (Derry, 2005) on re‐admission rates. As would be expected, patients with a history of substance misuse were found to be more likely to use drugs and alcohol on discharge. This group of patients were found to be at increased risk of re‐admission to forensic mental health services. Patients who participated in a 24‐session cognitive behavioural substance use programme were found to spend significantly more time in the community (89%) than those who did not (77%). These initial findings suggest that treatment for drug and alcohol problems can be effective in reducing re‐admission rates, and warrants further investigation.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Marianne Marcus and Linda Stafford

Substance use disorders are considered to be the nation's number one health problem. These continue to cause more deaths, illnesses, and disabilities than do other…

Abstract

Substance use disorders are considered to be the nation's number one health problem. These continue to cause more deaths, illnesses, and disabilities than do other preventable health problems, providing ample support for the need for developing health professional competence in this area. This paper describes the specific steps used by The University of Texas‐Houston Health Science Center School of Nursing to infuse substance abuse content into the undergraduate curriculum, design a graduate subspecialty in addictions nursing, and offer continuing education on substance use disorders to nurses in acute care and community settings. The paper provides guidelines for other academic institutions engaged in the important task of increasing nursing competence related to substance use disorders.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Andrew Derry

In recent years, a number of studies have linked mental health problems, substance use and offending. These findings have been reflected in government directives aimed at…

Abstract

In recent years, a number of studies have linked mental health problems, substance use and offending. These findings have been reflected in government directives aimed at targeting substance use problems within mental health services. The current study surveyed the proportion of patients with substance use problems in 87 forensic patients, and the service response by Lambeth Forensic Services as measured by care planning and substance use interventions. While 76% of patients had historical substance use problems and 35% of patients were currently using drugs or alcohol, only in patients whose substance use problems had been documented in their care plan approach (CPA) or addressed therapeutically was the percentage significantly lower.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Betty G. Brown, Julie A. Baldwin and Margaret L. Walsh

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the substance use disparities among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, the…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the substance use disparities among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, the contributing factors to these disparities, proven and promising approaches through strengths-based methods, barriers to implementation of prevention and treatment efforts, and future recommendations for effective programs and research.

Approach – We have conducted a thorough literature review of relevant research studies, as well as a review of government, tribal, and community-based curricula and resources. This review of programs is not exhaustive but provides several examples of best practices in the field and suggestions for future directions.

Social implications – We strongly advocate that to accurately explore the true etiology of substance abuse and to respond to the concerns that AI/AN have prioritized, it is necessary to utilize a strengths-based approach and draw upon traditional AI/AN perspectives and values, and active community participation in the process. More specifically, prevention and treatment programs should use methods that incorporate elders or intergenerational approaches; foster individual and family skills-building; promote traditional healing methods to recognize and treat historical, cultural, and intergenerational and personal trauma; focus on early intervention; and tailor efforts to each Native nation or community.

Value – Ultimately, to reduce substance abuse disparities in AI/AN youth, we must find better ways to merge traditional Native practices with western behavioral health to ensure cultural competency, as well as to develop mechanisms to effect system- and policy-level changes that reduce barriers to care and promote the well-being of AI/AN youth, families, and communities.

Details

Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Roger Friedland

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory…

Abstract

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory of institutional logics which I have sought to develop as a religious sociology of institution. I examine how Schatzki and I both differently locate our thinking at the level of practice. In this essay I also explore the possibility of appropriating Heidegger’s religious ontology of worldhood, which Schatzki rejects, in that project. My institutional logical position is an atheological religious one, poly-onto-teleological. Institutional logics are grounded in ultimate goods which are praiseworthy “objects” of striving and practice, signifieds to which elements of an institutional logic have a non-arbitrary relation, sources of and references for practical norms about how one should have, make, do or be that good, and a basis of knowing the world of practice as ordered around such goods. Institutional logics are constellations co-constituted by substances, not fields animated by values, interests or powers.

Because we are speaking against “values,” people are horrified at a philosophy that ostensibly dares to despise humanity’s best qualities. For what is more “logical” than that a thinking that denies values must necessarily pronounce everything valueless? Martin Heidegger, “Letter on Humanism” (2008a, p. 249).

Details

On Practice and Institution: Theorizing the Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-413-4

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2007

Matthew E. Archibald

Despite continuing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic gaps in many health care services, the National Healthcare Disparities Report (2004) documents parity in substance abuse…

Abstract

Despite continuing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic gaps in many health care services, the National Healthcare Disparities Report (2004) documents parity in substance abuse treatment provision among individuals of varying socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds. This study investigates that achievement by analyzing the relationship between community socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disadvantage and organizational provision of substance abuse treatment, treatment need and utilization across United States counties, 2000, 2002 and 2003. Results confirm equity in service provision in poorer communities and those with higher concentrations of African Americans. Significant disparities remain, however, in communities with higher concentrations of Hispanics, youth and female-headed households. Limitations and implications for future studies of health care provision are discussed.

Details

Inequalities and Disparities in Health Care and Health: Concerns of Patients, Providers and Insurers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1474-4

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Melissa A. Menasco

Purpose – This research presents results concerning the impact of family financial stress on adolescent substance use.Design/methodology/approach – Drawing a sample of…

Abstract

Purpose – This research presents results concerning the impact of family financial stress on adolescent substance use.

Design/methodology/approach – Drawing a sample of 18,614 adolescent males (9,459) and females (9,155) ages 12–17 years from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this work utilizes stepwise logistic regression and ordinary least squares to determine whether family poverty measures are associated with adolescent high-risk behaviors of smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and using marijuana.

Findings – This study found limited support for adolescent substance use within families who are experiencing economic distress. Adolescents from families who had moved at least once in the prior year were more likely to have used cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. Furthermore, males and females who disapprove of peers’ substance using behaviors are less likely to use those substances.

Research limitations/implications – This study may not explain adolescent substance using behavior outside of the United States. Further research into socioeconomic factors should be addressed in subsequent work as should the intermediary variables pertaining to the parent–child relationship.

Practical implications – Understanding contributing factors to adolescent substance use will assist in developing social policy that will support families.

Originality/value – This study provides insight into the consequences of family characteristics both socioeconomic and psychosocial which influence adolescent substance using behaviors.

Details

Economic Stress and the Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-978-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Richa Tripathi, Shalini Singh, Siddharth Sarkar, Rakesh Lal and Yatan Pal Singh Balhara

There is a paucity of comparative literature on pathway to care among patients with co-occurring disorders and those with only substance use disorders. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of comparative literature on pathway to care among patients with co-occurring disorders and those with only substance use disorders. This paper aims to compare the pathways to care among patients with co-occurring disorder and those with only substance use disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional observational study was carried out on male treatment seekers at a tertiary care substance use disorder treatment center in India. Participants were recruited in two groups, those with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders and those with only substance use disorders. The two groups were matched for age and socio-economic status.

Findings

A total of 189 subjects with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders and 197 subjects with substance use disorders only were recruited. Psychiatric services were the most common first point of care. However, a larger proportion of the subjects in the co-occurring disorder group received the first care from faith healers, while a greater proportion received first care from the therapeutic communities in substance use disorder only group. Initial care was sought mostly following suggestion from the family members in both the groups. The time to treatment for substance use disorders did not differ between the two groups, though the treatment seeking for substance use disorder was more delayed than that of psychiatric disorder in the co-occurring disorder group.

Research limitations/implications

The findings shed light on the pathway of care followed in India and is a matter of further research.

Practical implications

Expansion of services and dissemination of information about psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders can provide timely care to patients with substance use disorders and co-occurring disorders.

Social implications

The findings have a social implication as well. More awareness is needed currently in India for timely treatment of dual disorders.

Originality/value

The paper is an original research by the authors. The data were collected from the participants who reported to the dual diagnosis clinic. The findings are important as they tell us about the current understanding of dual diagnosis by the general public.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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