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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Jian-Ming Fu, Hai-Min Tang and Hong-Quan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new approach for rapid computation of subsonic and low-transonic rotary derivatives with the available steady solutions obtained…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new approach for rapid computation of subsonic and low-transonic rotary derivatives with the available steady solutions obtained by Euler computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is achieved by the perturbation on the steady-state pressure of Euler CFD codes. The resulting perturbation relation is established at a reference Mach number between rotary derivatives and normal velocity on surface due to angular velocity. The solution of the reference Mach number is generated technically by Prandtl–Glauert compressibility correction based on any Mach number of interest under the assumption of simple strip theory. Rotary derivatives of any Mach number of interest are then inversely predicted by the Prandtl–Glauert rule based on the reference Mach number aforementioned.

Findings

The resulting method has been verified for three typical different cases of the Basic Finner Reference Projectile, the Standard Dynamics Model Aircraft and the Orion Crew Module. In comparison with the original perturbation method, the performance at subsonic and low-transonic Mach numbers has significantly improved with satisfactory accuracy for most design efforts.

Originality/value

The approach presented is verified to be an efficient way for computation of subsonic and low-transonic rotary derivatives, which are performed almost at the same time as an accounting solution of steady Euler equations.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1950

S. Neumark

IN high‐speed level flight in the compressibility region an entirely new factor makes its appearance, viz: small variations of atmospheric density and speed of sound with…

Abstract

IN high‐speed level flight in the compressibility region an entirely new factor makes its appearance, viz: small variations of atmospheric density and speed of sound with height. This factor affects dynamic stability due to continuous changes of height during longitudinal disturbances; there is no effect in lateral disturbances. The affects are very small in low‐speed flight but they increase steadily with Mach number. The short‐period oscillations are not affected but the corrections to phugoid motion become appreciable in high subcritical flight, larger in supercritical (transonic) range, and very important in supersonic flight. The effects of compressibility are of paramount significance but they should be considered in conjunction with varying height effects. Another result of the investigation is the appearance of a new mode of disturbance, due to the stability quartic being converted into a quintic. The fifth (real) root is often small, it may vary in sign according to aerodynamic properties of the aircraft and characteristics of the power unit. The new mode is a subsidence or a divergence, and it determines height stability or instability, hence it may show to what extent an aircraft is able to keep constant altitude over long stretches of time.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 22 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1955

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1949

THE aerodynamic sessions of this year's Annual Meeting were not quite as dramatic as in some preceding years. But how can such sessions remain always at the highest pitch…

Abstract

THE aerodynamic sessions of this year's Annual Meeting were not quite as dramatic as in some preceding years. But how can such sessions remain always at the highest pitch? Aeroplane designers have broken through the sonic barrier and aerodynamicists now understand far better compressibility effects and supersonics. One cannot expect every year a startling announcement of the kind that von Kármán used to make, that the drag coefficient would actually drop in supersonic flight, or that camber contributes nothing to lift at the highest speeds. This intellectual calm is only temporary. Rocket flight at a hundred miles altitude where molecules become individuals will bring tine new problems. So will the design of artifificial satellites. But for the time being, research men and engineers must present papers that dig deep but do not strike out into new territory. Also it is barely possible that there is another reason for the less exciting character of the aerodynamic papers—the word ‘Restricted’. For example, in one session it appeared that the fuel consumption of a jet‐propelled helicopter is still restricted information. To mark things ‘Re‐stricted’ or ‘Confidential’ can become a tiresome habit. However, there was no lack of the striking in other directions. What, for example, could be more intriguing than a session entitled Human Engineering in Aviation? Aeronautics is not all a matter of physics, mathematics, design and innumerable gadgets. It is more than fitting that psychologists, teachers, physicians should play their part and make the life of the pilot an easier one. Of course, the engineers do occasionally develop ‘gadgets’ that help the pilot, as witness the remarkable Sperry Zero Reader (discussed in the Instruments Session), and Air‐Borne Radar (Air Transport Session) that seems to be coming into its own.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1946

A Summary by Dr. Alexander Klemin of the Papers Presented Before the Fourteenth Meeting of the Institute held at Columbia University, New York, on January 29–31, 1946…

Abstract

A Summary by Dr. Alexander Klemin of the Papers Presented Before the Fourteenth Meeting of the Institute held at Columbia University, New York, on January 29–31, 1946. AERODYNAMICS IN spite of increased wing loadings, the use of full span wing flaps has been delayed, because of inability to find a suitable aileron. The Development of a Lateral‐Control System for use with Large‐Span Flaps by I. L. Ashkenas (Northrop Aircraft), outlines the various steps in the aerodynamic development of a retractable aileron system well adapted to the full span flap and successfully employed on the Northrop P‐61. Included is a discussion of the basic data used, the design calculations made, and the effect of structural and mechanical considerations. Changes made as a result of preliminary flight tests are discussed and the final flight‐test results are presented. It is concluded that the use of this retractable aileron system has, in addition to the basic advantage of increased flap span, the following desirable control characteristics: (a) favourable yawing moments, (b) low wing‐torsional loads, (c) small pilot forces, even at high speed.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1955

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1952

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Nikolaos Kehayas

The purpose of this paper is to attempt an aerospaceplane design with the objective of Low-Earth-Orbit-and-Return-to-Earth (LEOARTE) under the constraints of safety, low…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt an aerospaceplane design with the objective of Low-Earth-Orbit-and-Return-to-Earth (LEOARTE) under the constraints of safety, low cost, reliability, low maintenance, aircraft-like operation and environmental compatibility. Along the same lines, a “sister” point-to-point flight on Earth Suborbital Aerospaceplane is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The LEOARTE aerospaceplane is based on a simple design, proven low risk technology, a small payload, an aerodynamic solution to re-entry heating, the high-speed phase of the outgoing flight taking place outside the atmosphere, a propulsion system comprising turbojet and rocket engines, an Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES) and an appropriate mission profile.

Findings

It was found that a LEOARTE aerospaceplane design subject to the specified constraints with a cost as low as 950 United States Dollars (US$) per kilogram into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) might be feasible. As indicated by a case study, a LEOARTE aerospaceplane could lead, among other activities in space, to economically viable Space-Based Solar Power (SBSP). Its “sister” Suborbital aerospaceplane design could provide high-speed, point-to-point flights on the Earth.

Practical implications

The proposed LEOARTE aerospaceplane design renders space exploitation affordable and is much safer than ever before.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative approach to aerospaceplane design as a result of a new aerodynamically oriented Thermal Protection System (TPS) and a, perhaps, improved ACES. This approach might initiate widespread exploitation of space and offer a solution to the high-speed “air” transportation issue.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1957

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1950

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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