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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Pascale Benoliel, Haim Shaked, Nechama Nadav and Chen Schechter

Today’s educational complexities require principals to adopt a more systemic perspective toward school management. Although research has emphasized the benefits associated…

Abstract

Purpose

Today’s educational complexities require principals to adopt a more systemic perspective toward school management. Although research has emphasized the benefits associated with the holistic perspective of systems thinking, research in the educational field has been limited. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of principals’ systems thinking (PST) in the relationships between instructional leadership (IL) and subject coordinators’ organizational commitment and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by surveying a sample of 226 subject coordinators from different elementary schools randomly chosen in Israel. Subject coordinators completed questionnaires on their PST competencies, their principals’ IL, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results confirmed the main hypotheses: PST did facilitate subject coordinators’ organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Findings also showed that PST mediated the relationship between IL and subject coordinators’ organizational commitment and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

By integrating research from both educational and non-educational literature, this study contributes to deepen our understanding regarding the antecedents and consequences of the PST as perceived by their subject coordinators, providing a broader leadership framework on their functions in today’s complex school systems.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Judy Nagy

The contemporary life of an Australian academic has changed in almost every way imaginable in response to the challenges and opportunities emerging from global and…

Abstract

The contemporary life of an Australian academic has changed in almost every way imaginable in response to the challenges and opportunities emerging from global and national policy agendas. In this context, the subject coordinator11A subject coordinator may also be referred to as a Unit Chair, Unit Coordinator or Course Coordinator at different universities. represents the frontline of a move towards increasingly distributed forms of leading and learning. The knowledge that managing teaching responsibilities does not provide a clear route to promotion (with active research status providing a more well established path) means that academics may proactively minimise the time they spend on the discretionary tasks of leading and managing teaching well. Tasks that include adopting a proactive longer term of curriculum development, team building and teaching innovation, in addition to the more immediate needs for compliance and measurable outcomes. Research from an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) project provides evidence that despite lack of formal recognition for many of the discretionary responsibilities of subject coordination, coordinators believe they are executing their job well. This chapter discusses factors that impede discretionary academic leadership behaviours in Australian higher education and suggests strategies to empower leadership and thus improve engagement with discretionary teaching and learning responsibilities.

Details

Discretionary Behavior and Performance in Educational Organizations: The Missing Link in Educational Leadership and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-643-0

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Philippa Soccio, Kate Tregloan and James Thompson

Post-pandemic education will be impacted by spatial and technological shockwaves, alongside other areas of society. Significant expansion of online learning will build on…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-pandemic education will be impacted by spatial and technological shockwaves, alongside other areas of society. Significant expansion of online learning will build on skills developed by educators and students in this tumultuous time, and in response to emerging challenges and structural transformations. This paper explores an oft-overlooked skill that underpins contemporary teaching, and posits that “coordination” will find its way to the centre of this new online world. The paper presents research investigating the translation of tactics for good subject coordination to an online context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed academic literature that explored coordination in higher education settings, and recent grey literature identifying expected changes to post-pandemic university learning. The authors developed a survey instrument to investigate the translation of previously identified characteristics of good coordination, and tactics to achieve them, into the pandemic-driven online learning environment. Survey analysis explored the level of difficulty reported by subject coordinators for this translation online, as well as their suggestions of additional tactics or concerns.

Findings

While the low number of respondents limits these conclusions, initial analysis suggests that the identified Tactics for Coordination can be applied with relative ease to online learning environments. At the same time, the expected burgeoning of online education identified an expected increase in demand for these skills.

Originality/value

The authors identified a lack of literature addressing subject coordination as a key skill, or evaluating coordination tactics, as well as a lack of resources for focused skill development. This paper addresses this gap, and prompts further and urgent response.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Vicenc Fernandez and Albert Sune

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of organizational forgetting on knowledge‐intensive firms and the circumstances in which the loss of distinctive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of organizational forgetting on knowledge‐intensive firms and the circumstances in which the loss of distinctive knowledge takes place.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research in this paper consists of a qualitative proposal based on two case studies in higher education involving situations of organizational forgetting.

Findings

A framework for conceptualizing organizational forgetting. Moreover, the results of the case study analysis include a categorization of organizational forgetting and a set of propositions about their causes.

Originality/value

Scientific research on knowledge management has focused on the processes of knowledge creation, use and transfer, but has devoted little attention to the processes of knowledge degradation and destruction.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

David Gurr and Lawrie Drysdale

The aim of this paper is to bring together for the first time three studies of middle‐level leaders in secondary schools in Victoria, Australia. The studies span more than…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to bring together for the first time three studies of middle‐level leaders in secondary schools in Victoria, Australia. The studies span more than a decade and allow consideration of the progress in developing middle‐level leadership roles.

Design/methodology/approach

All studies followed a consistent approach using multiple perspective interviews of middle‐level curriculum and subject leadership in government and Catholic secondary schools in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Principals, senior leaders, middle‐level leaders and teachers were interviewed to gain their perceptions on middle‐level leadership. Interviews were supplemented with school document analysis.

Findings

The work of middle‐level leaders is heavily dependent on how their roles are constructed and the capacities, abilities and attitudes of the leaders. Some are expected to be leaders that influence teaching and learning, and they may be developed and supported to do so. Too often, however, teachers in these key roles have few expectations or opportunities to exercise leadership. Whilst many have the capacity to be leaders of teaching and learning, others are not sure about their ability to influence teaching and learning. Suggestions are made for how leadership might be structured in schools to emphasise the importance of middle‐level leaders, and how these leaders can be better prepared and supported.

Research limitations/implications

Observational studies, studies of primary school contexts and cross‐country comparisons would extend this research.

Practical implications

Middle‐level school leaders need to be seen as key personnel in improving teaching and learning, school structures need to reflect this, and developing leadership capacity needs to be prioritised.

Originality/value

This paper highlights continuing issues with how the work of middle‐level school leaders is conceptualised and supported, and makes suggestions for leadership structure and the preparation and development of school leaders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Shalini R. Lihitkar

The major objective of this paper is to develop holistic e‐content for postgraduate students for library and information science with an aim to benefit the learners about…

Abstract

Purpose

The major objective of this paper is to develop holistic e‐content for postgraduate students for library and information science with an aim to benefit the learners about and beyond a syllabus. The objectives of the initiative are: develop e‐content in library and information science subject at postgraduate level drawing expertise from subject experts in colleges, universities and R and D libraries; impart training to subject experts in the process of e‐content creation; make e‐content available to students and peers using different delivery modes to impart formal and informal education and for supplementing and complementing the process of teaching and learning; and promote usage of e‐content amongst students and peers and teachers in library and information science.

Design/methodology/approach

Moodle software (www.moodle.org) and GSDL (www.greenstone.org) were downloaded and installed. Moodle was used as front end layer and GSDL was in back end layer as a backend repository system. The front end layer consists of Moodle as an application system and Mysql as a storage RDBMS system, and the business layer deals with managing access restriction, online socialization, knowledge construction/organization, and development. Various committees were formed for paper coordinators, content writers, content reviewers and language editors.

Findings

It has been observed that the converged framework would facilitate converged and improved global standards in the field of academics with LIS education being no exception. Thus, on the basis of the critical evaluation of the currently available online LIS courses offered by different universities and institutes, a framework has been proposed for possible use to develop an online LIS course in Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual model to develop the e‐learning environment in a Department of Library and Information Science. This study will be helpful to all who want to develop and implement e‐learning courses in LIS.

Practical implications

Practically it is possible to develop the e‐learning model for DLISc, RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur by integrating the two open source softwares (i.e. Moodle and GSDL).

Social implications

If the model were developed and used with a proper planning and execution stage, it would definitely be helpful for the learning purposes of the students as well as for the faculty members.

Originality/value

This is a conceptual model that could be applied to any university LIS department.

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

James P. Spillane, Eric M. Camburn, James Pustejovsky, Amber Stitziel Pareja and Geoff Lewis

This paper is concerned with the epistemological and methodological challenges involved in studying the distribution of leadership across people within the school – the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is concerned with the epistemological and methodological challenges involved in studying the distribution of leadership across people within the school – the leader‐plus aspect of a distributed perspective, which it aims to investigate.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the entailments of the distributed perspective for collecting and analyzing data on school leadership and management. It considers four different operationalizations of the leader‐plus aspect of the distributed perspective and examines the results obtained from these different operationalizations. The research reported in this paper is part of a larger study, an efficacy trial of a professional development program intended to prepare principals to improve their practice. The study involved a mixed method design. For the purpose of this paper a combination of qualitative and quantitative data, including an experience sampling method (ESM) principal log, a principal questionnaire (PQ), and a school staff questionnaire (SSQ) was used.

Findings

While acknowledging broad similarities among the various approaches, the different approaches also surfaced some divergence that has implications for thinking about the epistemological and methodological challenges in measuring leadership from a distributed perspective. Approaches that focus on the lived organization as distinct from the designed organization, for example, unearth the role of individuals with no formal leadership designations in leading and managing the school.

Research limitations/implications

Limited by the data set, the paper focuses on only four operationalizations of the leader plus aspect of the distributed perspective rather than taking a more comprehensive look at how the leader plus aspect might be operationalized.

Originality/value

The primary value of this paper is that it will prompt scholars to think about the entailments of different ways of operationalizing the leader plus aspect when using a distributed perspective.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Nick Sciulli and Robert Sims

In Australia, the public sector represents a significant component of the Australian economy and is a major employer across all states and territories. A constant stream…

Abstract

Purpose

In Australia, the public sector represents a significant component of the Australian economy and is a major employer across all states and territories. A constant stream of public sector management reforms has occurred over the last decade. These reforms include accrual accounting and budgeting, whole of government reporting, privatisation and contracting out to name a few. This would suggest that accounting graduates applying for positions at government agencies would benefit from some knowledge of these significant reforms. This paper aims to examine the perceptions of accounting academics as to barriers to public sector accounting (PSA) education in Australia and identify strategies for making the accounting curriculum more public sector inclusive.

Design/methodology/approach

Two data collection methods were employed in order to attain a comprehensive picture of the state of PSA education in Australia. Telephone interviews were undertaken with accounting academics across a carefully selected range of universities. This selection ensured representation across the core accounting units to gain an indication of the extent of public sector coverage in the core accounting subjects. In‐depth face‐to‐face interviews were then conducted at five universities across five states of Australia to probe further issues that emanated from the telephone interviews.

Findings

The findings suggest that in general, there is very limited teaching of PSA in Australian universities' accounting degree programs. Of the universities studied where issues regarding the public sector are emphasised, this is mainly due to a few academics who have a research interest in the public sector and so extend this interest into their teaching and the curriculum.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of strategies identified to achieve greater coverage of PSA in the curriculum. However, the findings suggest that unless the professional accounting bodies require PSA to be included in courses as part of the accreditation process, then it will be difficult to achieve significant improvement in the nature and extent of public sector exposure. Most interviewees argued that a key factor in increasing public sector coverage would be ensuring that the textbook writers for the core accounting units included more PSA examples.

Originality/value

The public sector in general, and PSA education is a neglected area of research. This study is significant as it highlights that although major public sector reforms have occurred in Australia and worldwide, this has had little impact on the accounting curriculum taught to students.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Gordon Howitt and Noel Harding

This paper reports on the introduction of a scheme based on the principles of Supplemental Instruction into the accounting curriculum at the University of New South Wales…

Abstract

This paper reports on the introduction of a scheme based on the principles of Supplemental Instruction into the accounting curriculum at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Supplemental Instruction is argued to have a number of benefits which complement the traditional faculty facilitated lectures, tutorials and seminars. The scheme was introduced into the first course in accounting with a view to improving student performance, reducing withdrawal rates, and encouraging the development of communication and interpersonal skills. Qualitative and quantitative data was collected in order to understand how students perceived the scheme, and what effect the scheme had on student performance. The results suggest that the scheme has had a positive impact on student performance. In providing this account, we hope to assist accounting academics identify subjects where Supplemental Instruction might be of benefit to students, and the issues to consider when tailoring the program to the specific needs of the subject.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Stavroula Kontovourki, Eleni Theodorou and Stavroula Philippou

In this chapter, we trace the emergence of a particular type of teacher subject, the subject-area counsellor, who became a key player during different phases of the recent…

Abstract

In this chapter, we trace the emergence of a particular type of teacher subject, the subject-area counsellor, who became a key player during different phases of the recent curriculum reform in the Republic of Cyprus (2004–2017).The understanding of teachers as subjects is theoretically informed by the Foucauldian notion of discursive power that helps understand how individuals are constituted (subjectivated) and governed (subjected) through language in power relations that permeate social institutions. This type of teacher was constitutedas a hybrid expert-subject by embodying academic expertise and teaching/practical experience in classrooms. We utilize data from individual, semi-structured interviews conductedwith subject-area counsellors and elementary schoolpractising teachers during the introduction and implementation of new curricula (2011-2014), to argue that this particular type of teacher subject emerged as a meaningful and dynamic meso-level. As counsellors moved in between the Ministry of Education and Culture/Pedagogical Institute (macro-level) and schools/teachers (micro-level), it was possible to observe that multiple curriculum makings were taking place, given that subject-area counsellors sometimes opened up spaces and further possibilities of curriculum-making with teachers; but, at others, those spaces were rendered impossible when teachers expected to receive teaching materials from them, thus reinstating pyramidal traditional hierarchical-administrative roles for both.

Details

Curriculum Making in Europe: Policy and Practice within and Across Diverse Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-735-0

Keywords

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