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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Subhash Jha, Sujay Dutta and Ahmet Koksal

This study aims to examine whether adding a quantity scarcity message to a monetary discount helps to improve consumers’ offer-related perceptions and intentions, and how…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether adding a quantity scarcity message to a monetary discount helps to improve consumers’ offer-related perceptions and intentions, and how the effectiveness of that message compares with adding time restriction to the offer.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments, where participants evaluated retail ads and responded to relevant measures, were conducted in two country markets.

Findings

Adding either a quantity scarcity message or time restriction to a monetary discount increases the potency of a retail offer. Further, when an offer ad emphasizes product and price-related cues in a balanced manner, time restriction results in more favorable consumer perceptions than scarcity. However, this difference in the messages’ efficacy disappears when the offer strongly emphasizes price-related cues.

Research limitations/implications

The US market sample is more homogeneous than the Indian one. Discounts were presented in terms of advertised reference prices; further research with other discount formats is desirable.

Practical implications

Understanding the relative efficacy of quantity scarcity message and time restriction in discounted retail offers can give managers flexibility in the use of these tools.

Originality/value

This paper addresses scholars’ call for theory-grounded research that provides guidance to retailers on the use of sales promotional tools.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Subhash Jha, M.S. Balaji, Ugur Yavas and Emin Babakus

Using the basic framework of the service profit chain, this study aims to develop an integrated model that explains the relationships among role overload (RO), customer…

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3756

Abstract

Purpose

Using the basic framework of the service profit chain, this study aims to develop an integrated model that explains the relationships among role overload (RO), customer orientation (CO), service interaction quality (IQ), customer satisfaction (CS) and sales performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of 872 customers and 530 frontline employees across 50 branches of a major retail bank in New Zealand serves as the study setting.

Findings

The results indicate that RO has a significant negative effect on IQ. Nevertheless, CO mitigates the negative outcome of RO on IQ. IQ fully mediates the relationship between RO and CS. Additionally, the effect of IQ on branch sales is fully mediated by CS.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the current survey does not permit causal inferences. Thus, future studies should adopt longitudinal designs. Also, future studies should explore the roles of other variables (e.g. job crafting, work-related self-efficacy) as possible moderators.

Practical implications

Results suggest that service managers should create a balance between the role requirements and organizational resources to mitigate the adverse effects of employee RO. To enhance IQ and CS, bank managers should coach employees about work overload and train them in CO while prioritizing the tasks.

Originality/value

Empirical research pertaining to employee–customer interaction through a nested framework accommodating data from customers, employees and firm performance is scarce. This study fills in the void.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

M.S. Balaji, Yangyang Jiang and Subhash Jha

This study aims to examine the potential guest perception of green hotel attributes (GHAs) and the underlying mechanism through which GHA perception influences attitude…

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1268

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the potential guest perception of green hotel attributes (GHAs) and the underlying mechanism through which GHA perception influences attitude toward green hotels, intention to stay at green hotels and willingness to pay a premium. It also investigates the moderating roles of personal norms and social norms in the influence of GHA perception on identification and trust toward green hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage survey was used to collect data via Prolific Academic. The authors tested the hypotheses on 521 valid responses using the partial least squares method.

Findings

The results show that identification and trust mediate the effect of GHA perception on attitude, intention to stay and willingness to pay a premium for green hotels. The authors found a positive interaction effect between GHA perception and personal norms on identification and trust and a negative interaction effect between social norms and GHA perception on trust. The interaction effect of GHA perception and social norms on identification is not significant.

Originality/value

This study presents an integrated framework for green hotel adoption by examining the potential guest perception of GHAs and explores how it fosters positive guest responses. Findings show that GHA perception positively influences potential guest responses through identification (the personal route) and trust (the social route). This study also simultaneously considers personal norms and social norms, together with the effects of their interactions with GHA perception on identification and trust.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Arun Sharma and Subhash Jha

Western business-to-business firms are under increasing competition from firms in emerging nations. As examples, Mindray in medical devices, LiuGong in earth moving…

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2563

Abstract

Purpose

Western business-to-business firms are under increasing competition from firms in emerging nations. As examples, Mindray in medical devices, LiuGong in earth moving equipment, Tata motors in Buses and Suzlon in Wind turbines are emerging as strong competitors in their industries. Yet despite increased competition from emerging nation firms, insufficient research has examined the growth of these firms, specifically in the areas of technology and innovation development processes. The purpose of this study is to examine how emerging nation business-to-business firms that have global ambitions achieve technology competence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined several case studies on emerging market business-to-business firms that have moved to global markets and highlight the following five: LiuGong China (excavating products), Mindray China (medical equipment), Suzlon Energy India (wind generators), Tata Motors Buses India and BYD Auto China (batteries to electric cars). The firms are in business-to-business markets, except for BYD China that emerged as a business-to-business battery supplier but is currently in both business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets.

Findings

The authors find that firms in emerging markets that have global ambitions follow different approaches to innovation development processes from conventional theories and assumptions held by scholars and practitioners in Western developed countries. Our cases suggest that firms follow the proposed progression: domestic markets – internally developed technology; domestic markets –acquired technology; and finally to, global markets – acquired technology.

Researchlimitations/implications

The authors contribute to research in three areas. First, they suggest that the innovation development process for emerging market firms is different from the Western world. Second, they provide a framework of innovation development process that can be tested in multiple environments. Third, this study suggests a deeper examination of the longitudinal development of business-to-business firms, an area that has received less attention.

Practicalimplications

The authors suggest that firms need to better track their competition from emerging nations because emerging nation firms can quickly acquire technology to become strong competitors.

Originality/value

Extant research has not examined these issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Subhash Jha, M.S. Balaji, Marla B. Royne Stafford and Nancy Spears

This paper aims to examine the effects of purchase environment, product type and need for touch (NFT) on cognitive response, affective response and overall product…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of purchase environment, product type and need for touch (NFT) on cognitive response, affective response and overall product evaluation in the USA and India.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted in two different consumer markets. In Study 1, participants evaluated haptic and non-haptic products and gave responses on cognitive response, affective response and overall product evaluation measures in the US market. In Study 2, the authors replicate Study 1 in a culturally different market of India and extend Study 1 by examining the moderating role of instrumental and autotelic dimensions of NFT on the effect of purchase environment on cognitive and affective responses.

Findings

Research findings suggest that cognitive and affective responses are the underlying mechanism between the purchase environment and overall response only for haptic product among Indian consumers. In contrast, affective response is the underlying mechanism explaining this relationship among US consumers. Furthermore, the instrumental dimension of NFT moderates the impact of purchase environment on cognitive but the autotelic NFT moderates the effect of purchase environment on affective response only for the haptic product but not for the non-haptic product.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a relatively homogenous sample in the Indian market in contrast to the US market.

Practical implications

Results advance the understanding of the importance of haptic information processing in consumer decision-making across different purchase environments, product types and NFT using psychological distance (proximity) as a theoretical underpinning. With non-haptic shopping environments (i.e. online and mobile) growing rapidly, the results have critical implications for development of marketing strategies in Asian and US markets.

Originality/value

Empirical research examining the underlying mechanism by which purchase environment influences overall evaluation for haptic product is scarce. Additionally, understanding of the differential roles of instrumental and autotelic dimensions of NFT on cognitive and affective responses is very limited. This research fills this void and provides an understanding of the specific environment in evaluating haptic and non-haptic products in two distinct markets.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ugur Yavas, Emin Babakus, George D. Deitz and Subhash Jha

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues as drivers of customer loyalty to financial institutions between male…

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1529

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues as drivers of customer loyalty to financial institutions between male and female bank customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of 872 customers of a national bank serves as the study setting.

Findings

Results showed that extrinsic cues were the more effective correlates of customer loyalty and that gender does not moderate the relationships between image cues and customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the current study does not allow causal inferences. Therefore, future studies should adopt longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Results suggest that, although transmitting a favorable image through extrinsic cues is critical, nevertheless, intrinsic cues (interactions among customers and bank personnel) should not be ignored. To reinforce this not only among current customers but also among potential customers, banks should use advertisements featuring favorable testimonials.

Originality/value

Empirical research in the banking services literature pertaining to the efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues in forming customer loyalty is scarce. This study fills in the void. Also, in determining if the relationships between image and customer loyalty vary by gender, the authors not only looked at male versus female differences on the basis of average construct scores but also examined the structural relationships among the constructs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Jeff Thieme, Marla B. Royne, Subhash Jha, Marian Levy and Wendy Barnes McEntee

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the mediating factors affecting the relationship between environmental concerns and sustainable behaviors.

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2681

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the mediating factors affecting the relationship between environmental concerns and sustainable behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors survey 467 respondents and use a structural equation modeling approach to assess environmental involvement and willingness to pay more for green products as mediating variables between a multi-dimensional measure of environmental concern and sustainable behaviors.

Findings

The findings suggest that environmental involvement and willingness to pay more for green products mediate the relationship between environmental concern and sustainable behaviors. But of the three dimensions of environmental concern, only concern for energy is statistically significant in the model.

Research limitations/implications

The results empirically validate the multi-dimensionality of the environmental concern construct and its relationship with consumers’ sustainable behaviors. Both involvement and willingness to pay more for an environmentally friendly product play an important role in linking environmental concern to actionable behaviors.

Practical implications

To reach green consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products and ultimately engage in sustainable behaviors, marketers should target those consumers who are most concerned with energy and more involved with the environment.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to study the gap between environmental concern and sustainable behaviors by utilizing involvement and willingness to pay more for an environmentally friendly product as mediators. Results provide critical insight into this often elusive gap. The authors also fill an important gap in the literature by including psychological factors driving consumers’ willingness to pay more for green products.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

M.S. Balaji, Srividya Raghavan and Subhash Jha

There has been an increased interest in marketing literature in understanding the role of sensory experience. However, few researchers have addressed multisensory…

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3271

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increased interest in marketing literature in understanding the role of sensory experience. However, few researchers have addressed multisensory interaction of visual and tactile evaluation for products salient in single sensory modality. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap and investigate how multisensory evaluation influences overall attitude and purchase intentions. Further, the role of individual personality variable in influencing the interrelationship between sensory evaluation and behavioral outcomes are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from 126 students who responded to attitude towards the product and purchase intentions after evaluating three experimental tasks. Repeated measures analysis of variance was carried out to test the multisensory interaction hypotheses.

Findings

The multisensory interaction of tactile and visual information was found to significantly increase the consumer attitudes for products dominant on single sensory modality of touch. Further, the multisensory evaluation led to greater purchase intentions than visual or tactile evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper is perhaps first to investigate multisensory interaction of tactile and visual sensory information in evaluation of products that are salient in touch properties. The current study further examines the role of individual personality variables in influencing interrelationship between sensory evaluation and purchase intentions.

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Ajit Kumar Sinha and Kumar Neeraj Jha

The purpose of this paper is to identify the problems faced by banks, lenders, financial institutions, public authority, developers and concessionaires in course of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the problems faced by banks, lenders, financial institutions, public authority, developers and concessionaires in course of financing of public–private partnership (PPP) road projects. Subsequently, the reasons that contribute to these problems were analyzed to come up with recommendations for mitigation of these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted is based on identification of financing problems and the reasons thereof, from a systematic and critical review of literature. Financing details including problems faced and reasons behind were extracted from details of one port, one airport and one road project. Data pertaining to financing of PPP road projects have been collected for completed (five projects) as well as projects under implementation (five projects) during a time interval of four months, starting from December 2018 to March 2019. The chosen three projects for case studies were executed in airport project at Kolkata in four years, offshore container terminal at Mumbai port in six years and Tuni Ankapali road project in three years. This period attains importance, as simultaneous progressive development and innovation in the PPP mode of project execution was taking place rapidly.

Findings

The commercial banks in India dominate in providing debt to the PPP infrastructure projects, especially in the road sector. The non-banking financial companies and other intermediaries were still in their infancy then, and a corporate bond market was growing steadily, though slowly. Financing problems faced by the developers resulted in unwarranted time and cost overruns emanating from delay in land acquisition and grant of approvals, with these being the two major barriers to private sector participation. Even schedule overrun finally resulted in increased construction and financing cost.

Originality/value

Demand for upgradation, building and expansion of transportation infrastructure (roads) exists to keep pace with economic development. Problems like lack of a developed market for financing, inadequate institutional capacity, lack of personnel having domain expertise and absence of exclusive legislation to govern the implementation of PPP road projects are encountered by the sponsors and developers. Delay in land acquisition and environment clearance inhibits any decisive action by the lenders and investors, as these two are integrally linked to the decisions to be taken with respect to the financing of projects. Investors and bankers are generally apprehensive of their investment getting locked in or ending up as non-performing assets. Identification and proposed mitigation of these problems may likely smoothen the rough edges for the financing of projects, resulting in smoother implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Saji K. Mathew and Robert Jones

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of non‐violent protest (satyagraha) in a multinational automobile plant in India that has suffered from considerable…

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1704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of non‐violent protest (satyagraha) in a multinational automobile plant in India that has suffered from considerable employee relations problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a case study of a Japanese‐owned company using data obtained from 30 personal interviews and from internet media sources.

Findings

It is found that workers initially pursued their protests through satyagraha‐style methods before taking on a more violent posture when company management refused to accept any notion of jointly seeking a new harmony. The reasons for these developments are explored.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for the manner in which scholars and practitioners view the respective roles, significance, and management of satyagraha and non‐satyagraha protest in Indian companies.

Originality/value

The importance of satyagraha in Indian employee relations is under‐researched in comparison with other factors, and is especially significant for culturally‐unaware multinational companies in successfully understanding and managing protest in the workplace context.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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