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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Stephen M. Mutula

Seeks to argue that the peculiarities of sub‐Saharan Africa, in terms of its socio‐cultural diversity, low economic development, linguistic factors, HIV/AIDS pandemic…

4566

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to argue that the peculiarities of sub‐Saharan Africa, in terms of its socio‐cultural diversity, low economic development, linguistic factors, HIV/AIDS pandemic, gender discrimination, low ICT awareness and so on, demand a new model of addressing the digital divide.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper largely based on literature survey and an assessment of the existing models of addressing global digital divide.

Findings

Sub‐Saharan Africa has certain peculiarities in high levels of poverty, high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, repressive regimes, civil wars, diversity of cultural and linguistic factors, gender discrimination, etc. that require new models for bridging the digital divide and that recognise the uniqueness of the sub‐continent.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed to determine new models of bridging the digital divide that can help sub‐Saharan Africa to leapfrog into the information age.

Practical implications

More attention is needed to alleviate poverty and meet people's basic needs for livelihood if attempts to integrate ICT into their lives are to be effective.

Originality/value

Sub‐Saharan Africa has largely relied on models of the developed countries to bridge the digital divide without paying close attention to how various technologies can effectively be integrated in the lives of the people to alleviate poverty and consequently stimulate ICT uptake. This paper provides some solutions.

Details

Program, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Ezra Ondari‐Okemwa

Knowledge‐based societies have come to be identified with the advanced economies. Knowledge is now looked on as a new source of competitive advantage. Those economies…

1626

Abstract

Knowledge‐based societies have come to be identified with the advanced economies. Knowledge is now looked on as a new source of competitive advantage. Those economies where knowledge is created and used in large quantities may be said to enjoy a competitive advantage over those that do not create and use knowledge in large quantities. Sub‐Saharan Africa is one region which needs to have access to global knowledge for its economic development. However, there are several impediments to promoting access to global knowledge in sub‐Saharan Africa. The impediments are identified in the study and solutions to the impediments proposed. Research methods used are highlighted.

Details

Library Management, vol. 25 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2022

Kesuh Jude Thaddeus, Chi Aloysius Ngong, Ugwuanyi Jacinta Nnecka, Njimukala Moses Nubong, Godwin Imo Ibe, Onyejiaku Chinyere C and Josaphat Uchechukwu Joe Onwumere

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the short and long run causal relationship between stock market development and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the short and long run causal relationship between stock market development and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa within the period 1990 and 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

Using panel data from 1990–2020 obtained from the World Bank development indicators, the study makes use of the autoregressive distributed lag model and the Granger causality and cointegration to analyze the long and short run causal relationship between stock market development and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa.

Findings

The findings unveiled that stock market capitalization had a positive and significant effect on economic growth in the long run and a negative insignificant effect in the short run within the period of 1990–2020 while stock market liquidity measured through total value of shares traded and turnover ratio had a negative and significant effect on economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa within the period of 1990–2020. The Granger causality test showed an inconclusive result between stock market development and economic growth; implying that the authors cannot say if it is stock market development that causes economic growth or it is economic growth that causes stock market development within the period of 1990–2020.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that governments of sub-Saharan African countries should encourage stock market development by implementing favorable rules for companies listing on their stock market, promote stock market integration with world markets to diversify risk, increase public awareness on stock markets, increase investors' confidence level and finally, remove stock market impediments like high taxes, legal and regulatory barriers to its development.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature by offering a whole new perspective on stock market development and economic growth since its conception in sub-Saharan Africa. Again, contrary to other papers, the study show how stock market development can contribute to the growth of sub-Saharan Africans’ economy.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

William Murithi, Natalia Vershinina and Peter Rodgers

The purpose of this paper is to offer a conceptual interpretation of the role business families play in the institutional context of sub-Saharan Africa, characterised by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a conceptual interpretation of the role business families play in the institutional context of sub-Saharan Africa, characterised by voids within the formal institutional setting. Responding to calls to take a holistic perspective of the institutional environment, we develop a conceptual model, showcasing the emergence of relational familial logics within business families that enable these enterprising organisations to navigate the political, economic and socio-cultural terrain of this institutional context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertake a review of extant literature on institutional theory, institutional voids, family business and business families and examine the relevance of these theoretical constructs in relation to the institutional environment of Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors offer tentative propositions within our conceptualisation, which the authors discuss in an inductive fashion.

Findings

The review underlines the relevance of informal political, economic and socio-cultural institutions within the sub-Saharan context, within which the family as an institution drives business families engagement in institutional entrepreneurship. In doing so, the authors argue business families are best positioned to navigate the existing Sub-Saharan African institutional context. The authors underline the critical relevance of the embeddedness of social relationships that underpin relational familial logic within the sub-Saharan African collectivist socio-cultural system.

Originality/value

By challenging the assumptions that institutional voids are empty spaces devoid of institutions, the authors offer an alternative view that institutional voids are spaces where there exists a misalignment of formal and informal institutions. The authors argue that in such contexts within Sub-Saharan Africa, business families are best placed to harness their embeddedness within extended family and community for entrepreneurial activity. The authors argue that family and business logics may complement each other rather than compete. The discussions and propositions have implications for future research on business families and more inclusive forms of family organisations.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Martin Samy, Henry Itotenaan Ogiri and Roberta Bampton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the public policy perspective of corporate social responsibility (CSR) implementation in Sub-Saharan Africa. There has been an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the public policy perspective of corporate social responsibility (CSR) implementation in Sub-Saharan Africa. There has been an increase in the number of countries adopting a national policy for CSR practice, particularly in the Western society. Despite the growing awareness about the role of government in CSR promotion, governments in Sub-Saharan Africa are yet to evolve policies that could help promote CSR in the region. As drivers of CSR, governments hold resources, like access to regulated parts of society that makes the inclusion of CSR opportunities relevant to strategic and operational management. From the extant literature, the role of government in defining and shaping the field of CSR is gaining wider acceptability.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative research approach, this paper examines the current status of CSR implementation, particularly from the public policy perspective in selected Sub-Saharan African countries. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with policymakers and policy implementers. The study adopted a thematic analysis and developed a rigorous phenomenological design to reveal the insights to CSR policy-making.

Findings

The findings established that the status of CSR implementation in Sub-Saharan Africa is influenced by absence of national CSR policy, CSR being mainstreamed in government constitution and CSR being a company initiative action to comply with international code of business conduct.

Practical implications

The results of this study could have policy implications for both executive and MPs of national governments for CSR regulatory policies.

Originality/value

In most developing countries, including Sub-Saharan African countries, the aforementioned institutional conditions are often an exception. There are both no legal and regulatory frameworks for Multinational Corporation activities and their socio-ecological impact, or such regulations may exist but are not adequately enforced (Rwabizambuga, 2007). This situation, unfortunately, has created a huge reporting gap between what organisations do and what they report regarding CSR. Hence, this original study adds to the body of knowledge for this region by revealing the central issues around the phenomenon.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Daniel Kipkirong Tarus

– The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of diaspora remittances on the banking sector development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of diaspora remittances on the banking sector development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This study makes use of panel regression analysis and simultaneously uses pooled regression, fixed effects and random effects on a sample of 23 Sub-Saharan African countries during the period 1994-2009.

Findings

The empirical results confirm that diaspora remittances affect banking sector development in Sub-Saharan Africa. All the empirical models support this prediction. Similarly, it was also found that high inflation has a negative effect on banking sector development. Other notable findings are that well-developed human capital and political stability enhance the development of the banking sector.

Practical implications

The study provides insights into the role of diaspora remittances in banking sector development in Sub-Saharan Africa. It provides evidence that attracting diaspora remittances for emerging economies could as well help in mobilizing the much-needed loanable funds for private investment.

Originality/value

The paper fills an important gap in academic literature by providing insights into the role of diaspora remittances in developing the banking sector particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study complements other studies focusing in Latin America and given the increasing migration of the Sub-Saharan African population in search of education and employment, this paper provides policy makers with evidence on the implications of remittances in developing the banking sector. It was also found that well-developed human capital and political stability promote the development of the banking sector.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Subramaniam Ramakrishnan

The survey of Sub-Saharan countries shows that after nearly two decades of stagnation, growth is reviving and is likely to receive additional momentum with the pursuit and…

189

Abstract

The survey of Sub-Saharan countries shows that after nearly two decades of stagnation, growth is reviving and is likely to receive additional momentum with the pursuit and judicious implementation of further fiscal adjustment efforts. The impact of economic stagnation on the financial management systems is evident in that they continue to be under severe strain despite a series of efforts aimed at their improvement. Lack of accountability and chronically ineffective control of expenditures are two of the major problem areas that need to be addressed. Among other areas that need to be addressed on a priority basis are the revamping of budgetary processes, including the development of a macroeconomic framework and forging more enduring links between planning and budgeting and improved management of foreign aid.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Ruth Dede Adikorley, Kristin Thoney-Barletta, Jeff Joines and Lori Rothenberg

The purpose of this study is to examine why Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not currently a major player in producing apparel for the US market and determine if SSA is likely…

1004

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine why Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not currently a major player in producing apparel for the US market and determine if SSA is likely to become one because of several opportunities that the region offers, including relatively low labor wages, an ample labor force and duty-free access to the USA through the 10-year renewal of AGOA.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with eight high-level executives in apparel sourcing and trade agencies to obtain their views on the opportunities and challenges of sourcing in SSA in relation to other major apparel sourcing regions. A descriptive analysis of the qualitative data was used to answer three research questions.

Findings

The findings reveal that SSA is a competitive region to source from, because of low labor wages and the duty-free benefits through AGOA. However, several challenges hinder a significant increase in sourcing from SSA. The executives recommended that for SSA to be a significant force in the global apparel market, vertical supply chains should be developed, where raw materials like fabric are sourced from within the country/region and SSA governments should become more involved in business environment improvements.

Originality/value

At present, there is limited academic literature on sourcing and supplier selection in Africa, particularly in textile and apparel sourcing in SSA. Based on interviews from high-level executives engaged in the sourcing decision-making process, this study reveals the benefits, challenges and opportunities for sourcing apparel from SSA countries.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2019

C. C. Wolhuter

This chapter commences by depicting the rise of Africa as a force on the world map as a contextual background for a survey of the education expansion and reform project on…

Abstract

This chapter commences by depicting the rise of Africa as a force on the world map as a contextual background for a survey of the education expansion and reform project on the continent in the past 65 years – arguably the biggest education expansion drive in human history. The main lines of the education expansion and education reform in Africa are reconstructed. Education in Africa is then assessed in terms of three dimensions: quantitative, qualitative, and equalization. While being nothing short of spectacular, the education project in Africa faces severe challenges, on all three fronts of the quantitative expansion, quality, and equality dimensions. At the same time, as the African continent is embracing the world of the twenty-first century, this changed world is also adding its share of imperatives to education. Finally, the role of comparative international scholarship in negotiating these imperatives and challenges is noted.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Eva Medina and Ainhoa Herrarte

Women’s empowerment is a multidimensional concept that encompasses different aspects such as access to education, freedom to make vital decisions, labor market access…

Abstract

Women’s empowerment is a multidimensional concept that encompasses different aspects such as access to education, freedom to make vital decisions, labor market access, wages, and political participation, among others. In this research, the authors construct a multidimensional index of women’s empowerment that takes into account individual resources and achievements and analyze its evolution across countries using data from the United Nations Development Programme and the United Nations for 17 gender indicators across 96 countries over the period 1995–2015. By means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, the authors identify three dimensions of women’s empowerment: reproductive health, economic participation, and basic education. In addition, the authors use cluster techniques to classify countries into four groups with similar behavior patterns in the different domains of women’s empowerment: a group of countries with high levels in the domains of reproductive health and basic education but with low levels in economic participation; a group of countries with high levels in the domains of reproductive health and economic participation that should pay attention to education; a group of countries with medium levels across the three dimensions of women’s empowerment, especially in reproductive health and economic participation; and a group of countries with low levels in all the dimensions of women’s empowerment, especially in reproductive health and basic education. The comparison of these different patterns serves to highlight the aspects in which improvements have been made or, on the contrary, to highlight the obstacles that are hindering the improvement of gender equality. Finally, the results suggest that advancements in women’s empowerment improve the countries’ level of development.

Details

Advances in Women’s Empowerment: Critical Insight from Asia, Africa and Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-472-2

Keywords

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