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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Bernd Kupka, Jonathan H Westover and Letty Workman

The purpose of this paper is to discuss experiential education as a way to develop future consultants in human resource management and marketing with the goal of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss experiential education as a way to develop future consultants in human resource management and marketing with the goal of developing consulting competence.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that proposes, outlines, and discusses a model, containing 11 dimensions of consulting competence.

Findings

The conceptual model includes 11 building blocks: foreign language competence, non-verbal competence, perception of cultural distance, cultural self-awareness, knowledge, skills, motivation, effectiveness, appropriateness, contextual interaction patterns, and affinity. Considerations for each of these elements are introduced and discussed.

Practical implications

This model and the explanation of its components should guide management and marketing educators in their efforts to build and develop experiential education programs of excellence.

Originality/value

The model proposed and outline in this paper will assist institutions of higher education and faculty members to guide students in their development of a successful career in consulting.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Stephanie J. Graves, Kathy Christie Anders and Valerie M. Balester

The study aims to explore collaborations between writing centers and libraries which create opportunities for providing information literacy intervention for students

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore collaborations between writing centers and libraries which create opportunities for providing information literacy intervention for students doing researched writing. This case study gathered data from writing center logs to uncover if and how information literacy activity was occurring during consultations.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative sample of writing center logs recorded between September of 2013 and May 2014 was mined for frequencies of library and information literacy terms. Transaction logs were coded and analyzed according to the frames in the Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

Findings

Information literacy is discussed in only 13 per cent of consultations. Referrals to librarians accounted for less than 1 per cent of all transactions. Students most commonly asked for assistance in formatting citations, but deeper information literacy conversations did occur that provide opportunities for engagement with the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

Research limitations/implications

Transactions were examined from one university. Although findings cannot be generalized, the results were applicable to local services, and this study provides a model useful for libraries and writing centers.

Practical implications

This study provides ample direction for future collaborations that will take advantage of the intersections of information literacy and writing instruction to improve student research skills.

Originality/value

Although much has been written about partnerships between libraries and writing centers, this study uniquely demonstrates a model for data sharing across institutional boundaries and how one library mined existing data from a writing center.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Integrating Service-Learning and Consulting in Distance Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-412-5

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2015

C. Andrew Lafond and Kristin Wentzel

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management

Abstract

Purpose

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management Accounting courses.

Methodology/approach

The assignment entails visiting a small business and interviewing the owner to learn about the company’s process for determining costs of products and/or services. Such active learning hones leadership and critical thinking skills by requiring students to employ interviewing and listening techniques as they act as business advisors to discuss cost accumulation processes with small business owners. The assignment provides flexibility since a range of business types can be used from a landscaping business operated out of one’s garage to a mid-size manufacturing company.

Findings

Students see how a small business accumulates costs and gain experience analyzing the effectiveness of cost accumulation systems and providing recommendations.

Practical implications

A list of supplementary materials is included, covering teaching notes, assessment data, and grading rubrics.

Originality/value

Student feedback suggests that students value the opportunity to engage in a realistic exercise that allows them to draw linkages between textbook material and the real world, while also acting in a consulting role to apply class concepts to small businesses. Furthermore, assessment data based on grading rubrics indicate that all students meet or exceed instructor expectations, thus increasing the viable use of this course project.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-587-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Denis Adams, Albakri Ahmad, Doug Haynes and Jim Sheehan

Begins by summarizing Stafford Beer's minimal model proposed in his report on the organization of Manchester Business School in 1970, and the conclusions made by Sir…

Abstract

Begins by summarizing Stafford Beer's minimal model proposed in his report on the organization of Manchester Business School in 1970, and the conclusions made by Sir Douglas Hague, when Beer's model was used as a framework to examine current business school practices and a vision for the twenty‐first century. To facilitate learning in a “reality” which closely resembled situations in A‐space, a business simulator course was designed and its cybernetics is explained to show how Beer's ideas were actually used to teach Beer's ideas. Also delineates the experiences of the students' practical use of Beer's VSM. Continuing the theme to interplay teaching, research and consultancy, describes the concept, model and the implementation of Janus — The Centre for Systems Thinking and Organizational Transformation; a centre for those who wish to study, develop, apply and promote Stafford Beer's ideas and works.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Grassberger and Sue Wilder

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of using a living case study method to teach graduate students in an organizational development (OD) course. A living…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of using a living case study method to teach graduate students in an organizational development (OD) course. A living case is defined as one where participants study a current, ongoing situation over the entire semester. Students worked with an authentic client to solve an authentic problem. After the course concluded interviews were conducted. Learners expressed a sense of feeling more connected and engaged with the course content because of the living case. Students also exhibited significant learning – new skills and mindsets developed during the course that are valued and used in their work, school, and personal lives.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an instrumental case study of a work-based instructional design used to improve student engagement and learning outcomes.

Findings

Students worked with an authentic client to solve an authentic problem. Learners expressed a sense of feeling more connected and engaged with the course content because of the living case. Students also exhibited significant learning – new skills and mindsets developed during the course that are valued and used in their work, school, and personal lives.

Practical implications

Higher education (HE) instructors are expected to teach students knowledge and skills that will be valuable at work and in life after graduation. Using a living case allows students to extract learning directly from the work experience. By using the concepts and the tools in an authentic, living case, students gain experience and concrete knowledge.

Originality/value

This study extends past research on connecting classroom learning and work experience. It looks at how a course designed using a living case study can be used to improve learner engagement and create longer term value for students.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Noah P. Barsky, Anthony H. Catanach and C. Andrew Lafond

This instructional tool provides management accounting instructors with an efficient and practical way to teach the Balanced Scorecard using experiential learning. This…

Abstract

This instructional tool provides management accounting instructors with an efficient and practical way to teach the Balanced Scorecard using experiential learning. This exercise requires students to visit their college or university bookstore, meet with store managers, and develop a Balanced Scorecard for the business. Students address contemporary performance measurement issues in a simulated consulting engagement as they research industry trends, analyze store operations, interview employees, and prepare a written report for store management.

The requirements of this active learning assignment address many of the analytical, communication, and experiential competencies recommended in widely discussed calls for accounting education change. Instructors appreciate the convenience, practicality, and rigor offered by this exercise. Students value the opportunity to engage in a realistic exercise that allows them to draw upon their own consumer experiences. The authors used these materials in both undergraduate and graduate accounting courses, and received positive feedback from students and bookstore managers alike.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-519-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Marie-Line Germain

Abstract

Details

Integrating Service-Learning and Consulting in Distance Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-412-5

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2014

Joseph O’Shea and Latika L. Young

In this chapter we argue that inquiry-based learning can be efficacious in providing diverse and flexible levels of challenge to promote educational growth across a…

Abstract

In this chapter we argue that inquiry-based learning can be efficacious in providing diverse and flexible levels of challenge to promote educational growth across a variety of populations. In this way, we position inquiry-based pedagogy as a way to support equality within education, as the practice promotes the academic and personal development of each unique student. We ground our argument in a philosophical approach that advocates for equality of educational growth as the principal guiding and evaluating measure. We outline how a university can take a scaffolding approach to embedding research-focused, inquiry-based learning throughout the curricular and co-curricular landscape of an institution, presenting an approach that facilitates students’ growth toward open inquiry and the highest levels of scholarship. Within an era of scarce resources, we focus on programs representing a wide range of cost and scalability so that they can be implemented to best suit individual institutional needs.

Details

Inquiry-based Learning for Faculty and Institutional Development: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-235-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Simon O’Leary

This research aims to assess how marketing-related projects with small- and medium-size enterprises act as a form of experiential learning and help develop entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to assess how marketing-related projects with small- and medium-size enterprises act as a form of experiential learning and help develop entrepreneurial and employability attributes for students in higher education (HE).

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on published material and an evaluation, within HE, of consultancy projects as a final assessment option alongside the well-established dissertation.

Findings

External initiatives that embrace experiential learning have helped students develop a better appreciation of client needs, while enhancing their confidence and team-working skills. The institutional degree programme studied is in its seventh year and more than half of students have chosen the project option so far. One key finding is the pivotal role of the academic supervisor and a need for that person to have suitable industry and sector knowledge, as well as effective and empathetic client relationship management abilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to one programme at one university but, as it encompasses a very broad definition of marketing-related activities, covers several years and is part of a longer-term longitudinal study, it constitutes research from which some conclusions can be drawn.

Practical implications

In addition to enhancing the students’ entrepreneurial and employability attributes, outward-facing activities help enrich the overall student experience and also offer HE institutions an opportunity to raise their profile with external organisations.

Social implications

With graduate employability rising in importance, initiatives such as these can help develop important graduate attributes and capabilities.

Originality/value

The principal originality and value is that this is a starting point for a potential longitudinal study of the impact of experiential learning and client-orientated projects on graduate career development.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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