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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Lisbet Pals Svendsen

Based on her membership in the Educational Research Group (The Danish name for the group is UFO group – Educational Research = UddannelsesFOrskning) at Copenhagen Business…

Abstract

Based on her membership in the Educational Research Group (The Danish name for the group is UFO group – Educational Research = UddannelsesFOrskning) at Copenhagen Business School, the author discusses learning as a paradox and how learning processes may be supported in adult learners through the use of social media enhanced learning platforms in the classroom. The chapter begins by looking at three paradigms in regard to adult learners’ learning processes and discusses how these paradigms may be put to use in connection with the application of Web 2.0 tools in the classroom. The chapter discusses the changing roles of educators and learners in connection with these new tools, just as it discusses which tools may be particularly useful in certain conditions. It ends by mentioning a number of concrete cases where the use of (first) an e-learning platform and (later on) social media enhanced learning tools has had an impact on student learning. The chapter additionally links university learning to organizational learning, since processes and principles are transferable between the two.

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Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Godson Ayertei Tetteh

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between the student’s study time and the learning process in the higher education system by adapting the total quality…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between the student’s study time and the learning process in the higher education system by adapting the total quality management (TQM) principles-process approach. Contrary to Deming’s (1982) constancy of purpose to improve the learning process, some students in higher education postpone their studies till the last few weeks of an examination.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an experimental study with three different classes of business school students. The experimental research question was “Do student’s study time (massed or distributed spacing) has an impact on the learning process?”

Findings

Results indicated that students in the “Strictly supervised study time” group improved on their learning process more than the “Not Strictly Supervised study time” and the control group. It is important for students to manage their own learning activities and follow a regular study time and constantly improve their learning process as proposed by Deming (1982).

Research limitations/implications

This study used restricted to undergraduate business school students in a university in Ghana, and may not necessarily be applicable universally. One other limitation was that the authors did not control for lecturer’s expectancies and how these may have influenced the studentslearning process. Another potential limitation was that TQM was the only subject area used for this study.

Practical implications

This objective of the study is to use the TQM principles of process approach, the Learning Theory and the Learning Strategies from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) – Pintrich et al. (1991) – to support theoretical and practical implications of the relationship between the student’s study time and the learning process. The results imply that students must take a more active role in their learning by having a regular study time.

Originality/value

Currently, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are not many experiment-based studies on a student’s study time using the MSLQ-Pintrich et al. (1991) approach. This study contributes to the literature by examining how a student’s study time (massed or distributed spacing) has an impact on the learning process.

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Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

P.A. Addison and Tungshan Chou

Fishbein and Ajzen's 1975 Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), updated by Ajzen and Fishbein in 1980, is advanced in this paper as an appropriate theory for measuring student

Abstract

Fishbein and Ajzen's 1975 Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), updated by Ajzen and Fishbein in 1980, is advanced in this paper as an appropriate theory for measuring student's intentions to adopt deep or surface processing and to adopt specific learning strategies. TRA is a decision theory that explains motivation by emphasising the specific processes that individuals use to make choices. TRA captures an individual's motivation by using the concept of intention to perform a behaviour. A TRA model was constructed based on a four‐latent‐variable (deep, surface, strategic and intention) framework and empirically assessed for model data fit. The survey items showed loadings on the constructs of deep, surface and strategic processing under this framework, indicating strong construct validity for the three learning factors. The TRA model was found to strongly positively influence the adoption of the deep processing construct, and to strongly negatively influence the adoption of the surface processing construct. In addition, it was found to strongly positively influence the adoption of positive learning strategies and weakly discourage the use of negative learning strategies.

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Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Igor Perko and Zoraida Mendiwelso-Bendek

Students develop knowledge through an ongoing process of learning embodied in their daily experiences. As citizens, they develop an identity in their communities as they…

Abstract

Purpose

Students develop knowledge through an ongoing process of learning embodied in their daily experiences. As citizens, they develop an identity in their communities as they build relationships through recurrent interactions, thus constructing citizenship by strengthening stable interactions. This paper aims to examine the development of student active citizenship within a Jean Monnet module summer school that uses a participative approach and experiential learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research provides a multi-level systems perspective on the learning experience in a Jean Monnet module. It combines state-of-the-art analysis of the Jean Monnet modules reports, analysis of a selected module’s activities and delayed participants feedback analysis. The methodology addresses complexity at multiple levels and leaves sufficient variance to invite readers to test the approaches themselves.

Findings

First, opportunities and gaps in the development of active citizen abilities were identified within the Jean Monnet modules. Second, it was established that the use of a participative approach and experiential learning aligned activities in the learning process yielded positive results in participant engagement. Third, long-term effects in the form of an improved understanding of active citizenship and the execution of activities in real life were also observed. The authors point to the need for active communication in the development of a full-cycle experiential learning process. Additionally, the multi-level monitoring model contributed positively towards the continual improvement of the learning process, and thus, provided a learning experience for teachers.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited regarding the clear articulation of the research results, rendering comparison with other learning experience reports challenging.

Practical implications

For lecturers, the importance of integrating the participative approach into the student learning process is documented; the effects of experience learning on students’ active participation are presented; and the importance of systems perspective on multiple aspects of the learning process is reinforced. For students, an example of the importance of being active in the learning process and using available resources is provided. For policymakers, the paper attests to the importance of learning programmes expanding the limitations of the regular curricula and the need to support additional programmes and the benefits of a participative approach and experience learning in the process of developing active citizens.

Social implications

The authors point to the need for authentic situational-context experience and active communication in the learning process. Additionally, the authors provide an example of systems investigation of the learning process.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the gap between the Jean Monnet modules and active citizen abilities and provides a potential approach towards reducing them. It also provides a multi-level method for monitoring and adjusting the learning process.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Amanda E. Major, S. Raj Chaudhury, Betsy M. Gilbertson and David T. King Jr

The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences from the voice of the authors (a science professor, an instructional designer, a distance learning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences from the voice of the authors (a science professor, an instructional designer, a distance learning doctoral intern, and a distance learning director) in the process of transitioning a face-to-face science course to online modality at a large, research university.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of this qualitative inquiry involves a personal narrative approach in which the authors reflect on their experiences of this process and analyze it through writing.

Findings

The findings examine the challenges of moving a traditional course online and reiterate the value of a team approach to ensure its quality. The narrative offers clarity to the different phases of such a project and can enhance decision making among those involved in course design and delivery, as well as administrators incentivizing the conversion of traditional courses to the online modality.

Practical implications

Online education has emerged as a viable solution. The challenges and rewards of transitioning face-to-face courses to distance learning modalities are well documented, even for a senior science educator.

Social implications

Universities face several modern day challenges, including reductions in state appropriations, lack of available space for classes, challenges of engaging a technologically savvy generation, and preparing students for a global marketplace.

Originality/value

To support faculty members’ transition to online education, universities offer instructional design support, where ideas are exchanged with faculty members to ensure pedagogically sound and engaging distance learning. The authors conclude with recommendations for both practice and future research in the area of practice and process improvement for diffusion of online courses at traditional universities, one course at a time. This is important to those beginning to transition course offerings online.

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Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Theres Konrad, Arnim Wiek and Matthias Barth

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed…

Abstract

Purpose

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed interpersonal competence. There is growing evidence that project-based sustainability courses facilitate interpersonal competence development. However, research so far has focused on single case studies and on assessing learning outcomes. The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of how graduate students learn interpersonal competence in project-based sustainability courses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a multi-case study approach triangulating observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups supported by Photovoice method. A comparison of three project-based sustainability courses in graduate programs at universities in the USA, Germany, Switzerland and Spain is conducted to gain generalizable insights on how interpersonal competence can be developed through project-based sustainability courses.

Findings

Receiving inputs, experiencing, reflecting and experimenting are four learning processes supportive of interpersonal competence development. Interpersonal attitudes seem to be mostly learned through a combination of experiencing and reflecting, followed by experimenting; not surprisingly, interpersonal knowledge is mostly developed through a combination of receiving inputs, experiencing and (collective) reflection; and interpersonal skills seem to be mostly learned through a combination of receiving inputs and experimenting, or, more directly, experiencing and experimenting.

Practical implications

These findings support the unique learning opportunities offered through project-based sustainability courses and can help instructors to better facilitate students’ development of interpersonal competence.

Originality/value

The value of this study is three-fold: (i) it provides a comprehensive picture of interpersonal competence, including attitudes, knowledge, and skills; (ii) it spells out specific teaching and learning processes; and (iii) it links these to specific interpersonal competence facets and components.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Agnieszka Kurczewska, Paula Kyrö, Krista Lagus, Oskar Kohonen and Tiina Lindh-Knuutila

Although the role of reflections in entrepreneurship education is undeniable, the research has focused mainly on their advantages and consequences for learning process

Abstract

Purpose

Although the role of reflections in entrepreneurship education is undeniable, the research has focused mainly on their advantages and consequences for learning process, whereas their dynamics and interrelations with other mental processes remain unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to better understand how personality and intelligence constructs: cognition, conation, and affection evolve and change along the learning process during entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand reflective processes in entrepreneurial learning this paper adopts the tripartite constructs of personality and intelligence. By employing longitudinal explorative research approach and self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm, the authors follow students’ reflections during their two-year learning processes. First, the authors try to identify how the interplay between the cognitive, conative, and affective aspects emerges in students’ reflections. Then, the authors investigate how this interplay evolves during the individual learning process and finally, by looking for similarities in these learning pathways, the authors aim to identify patterns of students’ reflective learning process.

Findings

All constructs are present during the learning process and all are prone to change. The individual constructs alone shed no light on the interplay between different constructs, but rather that the interplay between sub-constructs should be taken into consideration as well. This seems to be particularly true for cognition, as procedural and declarative knowledge have very different profiles. Procedural knowledge emerges together with emotions, motivation, and volition, whereas the profile of declarative knowledge is individual. The unique profile of declarative knowledge in students’ reflections is an important finding as declarative knowledge is regarded as the center of current pedagogic practices.

Research limitations/implications

The study broadens the understanding of reflective practices in the entrepreneurial learning process and the interplay between affective, cognitive, and conative sub-constructs and reflective practices in entrepreneurship education. The findings clearly indicate the need for further research on the interplay between sub-constructs and students’ reflection profiles. The authors see the study as an attempt to apply an exploratory statistical method for the problem in question.

Practical implications

The results are able to advise pedagogy. Practical implications concern the need to develop reflective practises in entrepreneurial learning interventions to enhance all three meta-competencies, even though there are so far no irrefutable findings to indicate that some types of reflection may be better than others.

Originality/value

The results of the analysis indicate that it is possible to study the complex and dynamic interplay between sub-constructs of cognitive, conative and affective constructs. Moreover, the research succeeded in identifying both individual variations and general reflection patterns and changes in these during the learning process. This was possible by adopting a longitudinal explorative research approach with SOM analyses.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Robin Bell and Peng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from 24 focus groups of educators who had been tasked with embedding constructivist entrepreneurship education into their teaching and curriculum, at four different vocational colleges situated in four different provinces in China. The data were coded and analysed for emerging themes using a process of bottom-up thematic analysis.

Findings

A range of concerns were identified from the focus groups and these could be divided into five main challenges, which were the role of the educator in the constructivist learning process and their ability to control the process; the educators perceived student reaction to the process and their engagement with it; the time and technology required to deliver the process; the link between the learning and industry; and the educators’ perception of the requirements to meet internal expectations.

Research limitations/implications

This research explores the educators’ perceptions of the challenges they face in developing and delivering active and experiential constructivist entrepreneurship education. Whilst these concerns may impact how the educators’ approach the task, these concerns are only perceived, as the educators’ have not yet implemented the introduction of constructivist entrepreneurship education when other challenges may become evident.

Originality/value

Encouragement by the Chinese Government to develop and deliver constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education has resulted in a number of tensions and challenges. Entrepreneurship education in China is still relatively young and under researched and this research contributes to the literature by exploring the challenges that educators face in developing and delivering constructivist entrepreneurship education in Chinese vocational colleges.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Soraya Sedkaoui and Mounia Khelfaoui

With the advent of the internet and communication technology, the penetration of e-learning has increased. The digital data being created by the educational and research…

Abstract

Purpose

With the advent of the internet and communication technology, the penetration of e-learning has increased. The digital data being created by the educational and research institutions is also on the ascent. The growing interest in recent years toward big data, educational data mining and learning analytics has motivated the development of new analytical ways and approaches and advancements in learning settings. The need for using big data to handle, analyze this large amount of data is prime. This trend has started attracting the interest of educational institutions which have an important role in the development skills process and the preparation of a new generation of learners. “A real revolution for education,” it is based on this kind of terms that many articles have paid attention to big data for learning. How can analytics techniques and tools be so efficient and become a great prospect for the learning process? Big data analytics, when applied into teaching and learning processes, might help to improvise as well as to develop new paradigms. In this perspective, this paper aims to investigate the most promising applications and issues of big data for the design of the next-generation of massive e-learning. Specifically, it addresses the analytical tools and approaches for enhancing the future of e-learning, pitfalls arising from the usage of large data sets. Globally, this paper focuses on the possible application of big data techniques on learning developments, to show the power of analytics and why integrating big data is so important for the learning context.

Design/methodology/approach

Big data has in the recent years been an area of interest among innovative sectors and has become a major priority for many industries, and learning sector cannot escape to this deluge. This paper focuses on the different methods of big data able to be used in learning context to understand the benefits it can bring both to teaching and learning process, and identify its possible impact on the future of this sector in general. This paper investigates the connection between big data and the learning context. This connection can be illustrated by identifying the several main analytics approaches, methods and tools for improving the learning process. This can be clearer by the examination of the different ways and solutions that contribute to making a learning process more agile and dynamic. The methods that were used in this research are mainly of a descriptive and analytical nature, to establish how big data and analytics methods develop the learning process, and understand their contributions and impacts in addressing learning issues. To this end, authors have collected and reviewed existing literature related to big data in education and the technology application in the learning context. Authors then have done the same process with dynamic and operational examples of big data for learning. In this context, the authors noticed that there are jigsaw bits that contained important knowledge on the different parts of the research area. The process concludes by outlining the role and benefit of the related actors and highlighting the several directions relating to the development and implementation of an efficient learning process based on big data analytics.

Findings

Big data analytics, its techniques, tools and algorithms are important to improve the learning context. The findings in this paper suggest that the incorporation of an approach based on big data is of crucial importance. This approach can improve the learning process, for this, its implementation must be correctly aligned with educational strategies and learning needs.

Research limitations/implications

This research represents a reference to better understanding the influence and the role of big data in educational dynamic. In addition, it leads to improve existing literature about big data for learning. The limitations of the paper are given by its nature derived from a theoretical perspective, and the discussed ideas can be empirically validated by identifying how big data helps in addressing learning issues.

Originality/value

Over the time, the process that leads to the acquisition of the knowledge uses and receives more technological tools and components; this approach has contributed to the development of information communication and the interactive learning context. Technology applications continue to expand the boundaries of education into an “anytime/anywhere” experience. This technology and its wide use in the learning system produce a vast amount of different kinds of data. These data are still rarely exploited by educational practitioners. Its successful exploitation conducts educational actors to achieve their full potential in a complex and uncertain environment. The general motivation for this research is assisting higher educational institutions to better understand the impact of the big data as a success factor to develop their learning process and achieve their educational strategy and goals. This study contributes to better understand how big data analytics solutions are turned into operational actions and will be particularly valuable to improve learning in educational institutions.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Francisco J. Arenas‐Márquez, José A.D. Machuca and Carmen Medina‐López

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer‐assisted learning experience in operations management (OM) higher education that entailed the development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer‐assisted learning experience in operations management (OM) higher education that entailed the development of interactive learning software, its evaluation in an experimental environment and the formal analysis of the teaching method's influence on student perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The software design follows the constructivist focus based on widely‐accepted educational technology principles. Objective tests of knowledge and subjective appraisal of the learning process were used in the experiment to compare two educational scenarios (computer‐assisted learning and on‐site class). Students' perceptions of the software's technical and teaching features are also analyzed.

Findings

The study shows that the teaching method can significantly affect students' perceptions of the learning process. The findings also confirm the pedagogical effectiveness of the software that was designed and that information communication technologies (ICT)‐based methods are an alternative to traditional methods used in OM education.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment involved strict control over various potential threats to validity. From a statistical point‐of‐view, the conclusions can only be generalized in the population analyzed. Nevertheless, the features of the software and the student profile allow the main conclusions to be generalized to other OM environments.

Practical implications

The use and evaluation of interactive software in OM educational environments are reflected on, with emphasis on the influence that the teaching methodology has on students' attitudes to the learning process. It is of interest for researchers interested in improving teaching through the use of ICT.

Originality/value

There are very few studies on interactive self‐learning software for OM and its effects on student perceptions. This paper is a new contribution to this field.

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