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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Simon Cassidy

Reports examining graduate employment issues suggest that employers are concerned by the lack of employability skills exhibited by entry‐level job applications. It is also…

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Abstract

Purpose

Reports examining graduate employment issues suggest that employers are concerned by the lack of employability skills exhibited by entry‐level job applications. It is also suggested that employers consider it the responsibility of educational institutions to develop such skills. The current study seeks to identify peer assessment as a potential strategy for developing employability skills and aims to examine – from a students' perspective – the process of introducing peer assessment into higher education teaching programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus of the study was on the assessment of students' attitudes towards both being assessed by and assessing other students' work. Data were gathered from a sample of undergraduate students following a structured peer assessment exercise.

Findings

In line with previous work, the study found that students expressed a positive attitude towards peer assessment but had concerns relating to their capability to assess peers and to the responsibility associated with assessing peers.

Practical implications

Results suggest that, whilst students would accept peer assessment as an element of their course, its introduction at least should focus on the development of evaluative skills (i.e. emphasising learning rather than assessment) and provide support to alleviate an onerous sense of responsibility. It is concluded that, if the value of peer assessment – in terms of employability skill development – is accepted, then it should be adopted as regular practice on undergraduate programmes wishing to equip students with a complete repertoire of employment‐relevant skills.

Originality/vale

The paper provides useful information on developing employability skills among students in higher education through peer assessment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Mahmoud F. Alquraan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the assessment methods used in higher education to assess students' learning, and to investigate the effects of college and grading…

1233

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the assessment methods used in higher education to assess students' learning, and to investigate the effects of college and grading system on the used assessment methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study investigates the assessment methods used by teachers in higher education to assess their students' learning outcomes. An instrument consisting of 15 items (each item is an assessment method) was distributed to 736 undergraduate students from four public universities in Jordan.

Findings

Findings show that traditional paper‐pencil test is the most common method that is used to assess learning in higher education. Results also show that teachers in colleges of science and engineering and colleges of nursing use different assessment methods to assess learning, besides traditional testing such as: real life tasks (authentic assessment), papers, and projects. Also, the results show that teachers use the same assessment methods to assess learning, despite the grading systems (letter or numbers) used at their institutes.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of the study was limited to undergraduate students and teachers' points of views about the frequent use of assessment methods were not studied.

Practical implications

Higher education institutes should encourage teachers to use new and modern assessment methods as well as traditional paper‐pencil testing, and study the reasons for not using these new methods.

Originality/value

The paper should alert the higher education institutes about the important of developing the assessment process, through knowing their students' points of view about the assessment methods. This will help to get students involved in the learning process.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Paul Humphreys, Kate Greenan and Heather McIlveen

Student assessment and the development of transferable personal skills are receiving increasing attention in higher education establishments. Examines the potential for…

30036

Abstract

Student assessment and the development of transferable personal skills are receiving increasing attention in higher education establishments. Examines the potential for enhancing student learning through the development of groupwork, presentation and self‐ and peer‐assessment skills. Describes a methodology which indicates the approach adopted and a questionnaire evaluates students’ impressions of the process. Concludes that skill development does take place and that students find groupwork an enjoyable learning experience. With regard to self and peer‐assessment, students were not as enthusiastic. Ultimately, there is a need to continue to involve students so that they can see evaluation in a positive, developmental light and to encourage students to take a more proactive role in assessing their performance.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Bonnie J.M. Swoger

The purpose of this study was to determine what skills students already possessed as entering first‐year students, in order to define appropriate goals and objectives for…

1640

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine what skills students already possessed as entering first‐year students, in order to define appropriate goals and objectives for library instruction sessions occurring in the first‐year writing and critical thinking course.

Design/methodology/approach

A pre‐test was administered during the first two weeks of the fall 2008 semester. After one‐shot library instruction, students took a post‐test during the final exam period of the fall 2008 semester. Librarians worked collaboratively to evaluate the results of the assessment and determine the implications for the session goals and objectives.

Findings

The original goals and objectives for the library instruction sessions were out of sync with student skills. Assessment also revealed that the original goals and objectives were out of sync with librarian priorities. The results of the assessment were used to refine the goals and objectives through a collaborative process.

Practical implications

Instruction librarians need to evaluate their course goals and objectives as one part of the assessment cycle. Assessment can be a useful tool for aligning librarian priorities and pre‐existing student skills.

Originality/value

This study explains how the results of assessment can be used to close the assessment loop, concentrating on parts of the assessment cycle seldom discussed in the literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Darrall Thompson and Ian McGregor

Group‐based tasks or assignments, if well designed, can yield benefits for student employability and other important attribute developments. However there is a fundamental…

1865

Abstract

Purpose

Group‐based tasks or assignments, if well designed, can yield benefits for student employability and other important attribute developments. However there is a fundamental problem when all members of the group receive the same mark and feedback. Disregarding the quality and level of individual contributions can seriously undermine many of the educational benefits that groupwork can potentially provide. This paper aims to describe the authors' research and practical experiences of using self and peer assessment in an attempt to retain these benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

Both authors separately used different paper‐based methods of self and peer assessment and then used the same web‐based assessment tool. Case studies of their use of the online tool are described in Business Faculty and Design School subjects. Student comments and tabular data from their self and peer assessment ratings were compared from the two Faculties.

Findings

The value of anonymity when using the online system was found to be important for students. The automatic calculation of student ratings facilitated the self and peer assessment process for large classes in both design and business subjects. Students using the online system felt they were fairly treated in the assessment process as long as it was explained to them beforehand. Students exercised responsibility in the online ratings process by not over‐using the lowest rating category. Student comments and analysis of ratings implied that a careful and reflective evaluation of their group engagement was achieved online compared with the paper‐based examples quoted.

Research limitations/implications

This was not a control group study as the subjects in business and design were different for both paper‐based and online systems. Although the online system used was the same (SPARK), the group sizes, rating scales and self and peer assessment criteria were different in the design and business cases.

Originality/value

The use of paper‐based approaches to calculate a fair distribution of marks to individual group members was not viable for the reasons identified. The article shows that the online system is a very viable option, particularly in large student cohorts where students are unlikely to know one another.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Sara Marcus

To examine whether students have higher retention rates of material when they participate in online quizzes or online alternative student‐centered assignments on the…

666

Abstract

Purpose

To examine whether students have higher retention rates of material when they participate in online quizzes or online alternative student‐centered assignments on the material presented in the F2F class.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the literature; and analyzes data from the implementation of both types of assessment for the online sessions of the course (student‐centered and faculty‐centered) as correlated with mid‐term and final examination scores.

Findings

A significant difference was found on both mid‐term and final examination scores by participants and non‐participants in the assessments. A significant difference was not found in the participation levels in the various assessment types. In addition, a minimal relationship was found between the assessment type and the act of participating in the assessment. The assessment type was not found to have a significant effect, though the participation in the assessment type did have an effect.

Research limitations/implications

Only two terms' worth of students, in one course, were examined. The assessments were not analyzed for equivalence in their coverage of the materials. Further research is needed on types of activities and level of participation, types of participation and level of learning, and participation scale grade rather than a yes/no method, are correlated.

Practical implications

Provides a very useful source of information, guidance, and support for instructors considering the use of online assessments in their hybrid courses.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need in the usage of alternative assessments and offers practical help to faculty teaching a theatre arts hybrid class.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Linda Lin, Dennis Foung and Julia Chen

This study aims to examine the impact of the transformation of an assessment on students’ performance and perspectives in an English for Academic Purposes course in Hong…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of the transformation of an assessment on students’ performance and perspectives in an English for Academic Purposes course in Hong Kong. The assessment was changed from the traditional pen-and-paper mode to an unproctored online mode.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed methods, the research team analysed the differences between the assessment performances of those who took the course before the pandemic (n = 664) and those who took it during the pandemic (n = 702). Furthermore, focus group interviews were conducted with seven students regarding their perspectives on the unproctored assessment.

Findings

The results revealed that, although there were no major differences in the overall grades of the two groups, students who were assessed online during the pandemic performed significantly better in terms of their English use. Nevertheless, the shift to online assessment had several negative effects on the students.

Originality/value

Previous studies on unproctored online assessments (UOA) were concerned with potential learning quality issues, such as plagiarism and grade inflation. This study, however, provided empirical evidence that high-quality assessment delivery can be provided via UOA if the question types and assessment arrangements are carefully decided.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Evelyn Hickey

Barriers exist on large scale assessment when students are not able to perform at potential for a variety of reasons. Accommodations are mostly available for students who…

Abstract

Barriers exist on large scale assessment when students are not able to perform at potential for a variety of reasons. Accommodations are mostly available for students who meet criteria for diagnosed disability or criteria for the identification of students who have English as a second language. However, knowing that students have diverse needs, accommodations for a few may not be providing appropriate access for all. Options for designing broader universal design for learning (UDL) on large scale assessment, through strategies that are typically restricted to special accommodations, increase access.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Radmila M. Rasmussen

This chapter exemplifies how assessment is performed in innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E) at the university education and how educators apply and view formative…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter exemplifies how assessment is performed in innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E) at the university education and how educators apply and view formative assessment as an important tool in enhancing students’ learning outcomes.

Methodology/approach

A case study methodology was applied to characterize the diversity of assessment and evaluation in I&E-education. Covering major scholarly disciplines 10 cases were selected based on mapping of course outlines obtained from university databases across 7 Danish universities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with course responsible educators focusing on alignment between learning goals, assessment forms and criteria, and feedback.

Findings

The analysis shows that educators emphasize the importance of formative and learner-centered assessment forms alongside summative, credit-giving assessment. Educators experience that logbooks, learning journals, prototypes, informal feedback session with stakeholders have a crucial potential for enhancing students’ transformative learning.

Research limitations

This study is descriptive and solely based on the educators’ perspectives. To provide more scientifically sound knowledge on the relationship between assessment types and I&E learning outcomes, future research should include students’ perspective and preferably apply both quantitative experimental and qualitative research designs.

Practical implications

The study provides inspiration to educators, researchers, and policy-makers on how to conduct assessment that stimulates students learning in I&E-education.

Originality/value

Considering that the research on how assessment in I&E-education impacts students learning is limited, this study provides important contribution by identifying links between formative assessment types and enhancement of student learning.

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Mikhaila Burgess and Helen Phillips

A key role of the external examiner is to review student work submitted for assessment plus the feedback and grading undertaken on that work by academic staff. The aim of…

Abstract

A key role of the external examiner is to review student work submitted for assessment plus the feedback and grading undertaken on that work by academic staff. The aim of this is to ensure equitability between the assessments of individual students’ achievement and consistency and comparability across courses throughout the program and with commensurate study levels and programs at other institutions, whilst safeguarding academic standards. The variety of assessment-types that an external examiner may review can be diverse. When the primary focus of the work being assessed is tangible, such as with written examinations or assignments, external examiners are able to view student achievements and assessor actions through a lens comparable to that of the original assessors. However, this process cannot adequately capture assessment-types where the only evidence is proxies to the original achievement. In this chapter, the authors explore the concept of authentic assessments, the benefits of incorporating them within study programs, identify challenges pertaining to their presence to holistic quality assurance (QA) processes in general, and the role of the external examiner in particular. The authors will demonstrate how adopting non-intrusive technologies for recording and verifying authentic assessment practices can strengthen the QA process for the benefit of all stakeholders. For illustration, a case study is employed to demonstrate how these challenges have been tackled regarding performance-based authentic assessments at an institution in Norway. The chapter concludes with a summary plus a call to arms for further research into how quality and consistency can be assured when authentic assessments are employed.

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

Keywords

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