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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2011

John Rogers and Morgan Smith

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best predictors of student satisfaction with teaching.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best predictors of student satisfaction with teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger survey around student satisfaction differences in overall satisfaction with the course were compared to age, gender and enrolment characteristics. In addition the relationship between overall satisfaction and other quality teaching indicators was examined to identify those areas that were the best predictors of overall student satisfaction.

Findings

The best joint predictors of overall satisfaction were genuine interest in the individual's learning needs and progress, development of understanding of concepts and principles, clear expectations, the genuine interest of staff in teaching and reasonable workload.

Research limitations/implications

There was a relatively low response rate for the survey (7.56 percent). No data were available on students who had the opportunity but did not respond. Based on demographic data the proportions of students responding to the questionnaire were similar to the overall demographics for the cohort for age, gender, mode of study and study load.

Practical implications

Genuine interest in students' needs and progress can be demonstrated by staff demonstrating empathy, being accessible and approachable as well as encouraging and supportive.

Originality/value

At a time in higher education when the workloads of many academics are increasing this research serves as a timely reminder that students appreciate staff who demonstrate genuine interest in their individual needs.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Tabitha L. James, Jie Zhang, Han Li, Jennifer L. Ziegelmayer and Eduardo David Villacis-Calderon

Most students are considered digital natives and are presumably equipped to handle extensive technology use. However, online learning turns students into involuntary…

Abstract

Purpose

Most students are considered digital natives and are presumably equipped to handle extensive technology use. However, online learning turns students into involuntary telecommuters when it is the primary modality. The prevailing trends of online learning, digital socialization, telehealth and other online services, combined with remote work has increased students' reliance on information and communications technologies (ICTs) for all purposes, which may be overwhelming. We examine how technology overload strains the ability of online learning to meet students' basic psychological needs (BPNs), which can decrease positive outcomes such as academic enjoyment and personal performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected via an online survey of 542 university students and the proposed model was tested using partial least squares (PLS) regression.

Findings

We find that technology overload can diminish the positive relationship between online learning intensity and BPNs satisfaction, which is alarming because BPNs satisfaction is critical to students' positive experiences. Moreover, we find that technology overload and lack of technology experience can directly drive BPNs frustration, which decreases positive outcomes and increases academic anxiety.

Originality/value

We extend a theoretical framework for telecommuting to examine online learning. Additionally, we consider the role of technology overload and experience both as drivers and as moderators of students' BPNs satisfaction and frustration in online learning. Our results provide valuable insights that can inform efforts to rebalance the deployment of ICTs to facilitate online educational experiences.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Po Tsai and Panayiotis Antoniou

This paper aims to describe the findings of a study investigating the relationships between teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, teacher self-efficacy, student

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the findings of a study investigating the relationships between teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, teacher self-efficacy, student achievement and teacher job satisfaction in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 110 fifth grade primary school teachers and their students (n = 2,334) between 10 and 10 years old. A teacher questionnaire and a criterion-reference test in mathematics were distributed during the academic year 2016–2017. The data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and stepwise linear regression.

Findings

The results revealed that teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, efficacy in classroom environment and student achievement in mathematics could, to some extent, explain variations in teacher job satisfaction. Of all the variables, teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics explained the largest portion of the variance in teacher job satisfaction.

Originality/value

These findings support the proposition that teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics affect teacher job satisfaction, which is in turn, translatable into enhanced teacher effectiveness. It is important to note that this study explores the impact of student achievement on teacher job satisfaction (and not the other way round), which is a relationship that remains under-researched and needs further investigation. Implications of the findings are discussed, and suggestions for further studies are provided.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Khawaja Fawad Latif, Louise Bunce and Muhammad Shakil Ahmad

Student loyalty is important if universities are to stay in business by recruiting and retaining satisfied students who provide positive evaluations of their university to…

Abstract

Purpose

Student loyalty is important if universities are to stay in business by recruiting and retaining satisfied students who provide positive evaluations of their university to others. The current study employed a theoretical framework established by consumer researchers to test the hypothesis that university social responsibility (USR) would predict student loyalty, but that this relation would be mediated by perceived service quality, student satisfaction, and student trust in their university.

Design/methodology/approach

Fee-paying university students in Pakistan (n = 608) completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of USR and service quality, their satisfaction with and trust in their university, and loyalty toward their university.

Findings

Structural equation modelling with partial least squares software supported the hypotheses that higher perceived USR would be related to higher student loyalty, and that this relation would be mediated by perceived service quality, student satisfaction, and student trust.

Originality/value

This study provides a novel contribution to the limited literature on USR and its relations with student loyalty. Several models have previously examined the relation between corporate social responsibility and general consumer loyalty, but these have limited applicability to the education sector. The data in this study support a model showing that USR supports student loyalty through its positive impact on perceptions of service quality, student satisfaction, and student trust. The findings suggest that USR could be a marketing tool that supports student loyalty, as long as USR initiatives increase students' perceptions of service quality, satisfaction and trust in their university.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Khaldoun Mohammad Hamdan, Ahmad M. Al-Bashaireh, Zainab Zahran, Amal Al-Daghestani, Samira AL-Habashneh and Abeer M. Shaheen

This study aimed to investigate Jordanian university students' interaction, Internet self-efficacy, self-regulation and satisfaction regarding online education during the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to investigate Jordanian university students' interaction, Internet self-efficacy, self-regulation and satisfaction regarding online education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A correlational cross-sectional design was utilized using convenience sampling to include 702 undergraduate students from Jordanian universities using an online self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, T-tests, one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The mean score of students' satisfaction was low (m = 45.14, SD = 25.62). Regarding student's interaction, learner-instructor interaction had the highest total mean score (m = 58.53, SD = 24.51), followed by learner-learner interaction (m = 47.50, SD = 22.64). Learner-content interaction had the lowest total mean score (m = 45.80, SD = 24.60). Significant differences in students' satisfaction were identified according to the level of education, university type and marital status. Significant predictors of students' satisfaction with online education were self-regulated learning, Internet self-efficacy, learner-content interaction, learner-learner interaction and the number of e-learning theoretical courses.

Originality/value

Online education is not well-established in developing countries. This study contributed to the limited knowledge of university students’ preparedness and satisfaction with online education during the early stage of COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Ayşe Collins, Zeynep Goknil Sanal and Aygil Takır

The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine international studentssatisfaction on the quality of a private university in Turkey and the factors which…

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine international studentssatisfaction on the quality of a private university in Turkey and the factors which influence their satisfaction. The study also investigated international students’ suggestions to improve their studies and life in Turkey. For these purposes, focus group interviews were conducted with 27 international students. Deductive coding was used to analyse collected data. The findings show that international studentssatisfaction is shaped by a number of different factors including, perceived quality of teaching, living and support service experiences and scholarships. Results also showed that participants considered extracurricular activities as an important part of their experiences when it comes to improving their campus life and learning experience.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Sartaj Chaudhary and Ajoy Kumar Dey

The past decade has seen a proliferation of research on service quality in education. However, little attempt has been made to understand the impact of student perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The past decade has seen a proliferation of research on service quality in education. However, little attempt has been made to understand the impact of student perceived service quality on sustainability practices of the university or the effect of such practices on student satisfaction. To bridge this gap, this paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to examine the relationships between service quality, sustainable practices and student satisfaction from the perspective of students.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative methodology was employed, and data were collected through an online structured questionnaire. Responses were gathered from undergraduate students (n = 419) studying in four colleges affiliated to a university in Delhi, India. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to validate the instruments. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the associations between the constructs.

Findings

The research revealed that student perceived service quality in education has a significant effect on their perception of sustainable practices of the university and student satisfaction. Further, sustainable practices predict student satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may guide the key decision-makers in the education industry to incorporate service quality and sustainable practices in their strategy and thereby enhance student satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to examine the impact of service quality as perceived by students on the perception of sustainability practices of the university. Further, it empirically tests the effect of perceived sustainability practices on student satisfaction.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Abderrahim Benlahcene, Amrita Kaur and Rosna Awang-Hashim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the associations between students' basic psychological needs satisfaction, including novelty satisfaction, and the four aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the associations between students' basic psychological needs satisfaction, including novelty satisfaction, and the four aspects of student engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a total sample of 743 undergraduate students from three public universities in northern Malaysia. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Competence and relatedness were positively related to the four aspects of student engagement, while autonomy satisfaction was found to relate to agentic engagement. Novelty satisfaction, on the other hand, is related positively with behavioural, emotional and cognitive engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide a new understanding on the importance of novelty satisfaction alongside existing needs in self-determination theory (SDT) in enhancing student engagement.

Practical implications

Educators are encouraged to develop strategies to provide novelty support and facilitate students' basic needs satisfaction in order to establish a motivational learning environment that vitalises students' engagement.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground by testing the unique relationships of novelty satisfaction along with the psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness, with the four aspects of student engagement in higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Kristine J. Olson, Ann Hergatt Huffman and Kaylee Litson

Using social cognitive career theory in tandem with gender role theory, the current research examines how instrumental and socioemotional mentor support experiences are…

Abstract

Purpose

Using social cognitive career theory in tandem with gender role theory, the current research examines how instrumental and socioemotional mentor support experiences are linked to mentee career optimism among a sample of STEM graduate students. More specifically, this study examines how self-efficacy and school satisfaction mediate the relationship dependent on the gender of the student as well as the gender of the mentor.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of N = 828 (n = 408 women, n = 420 men) graduate students enrolled in one of 119 public STEM graduate programs in the USA participated in an online survey.

Findings

Results suggest that student gender did not moderate the proposed mediation model. However, the instrumental support experiences → self-efficacy → career optimism mediation relationship was moderated by mentor gender with female mentors strengthening the relationship between mentor support experiences and optimism. Finally, same-gender mentor–student dyads experience consistency of school satisfaction regardless of instrumental mentor support experiences compared to the heterogeneous gender mentor–student dyads where school satisfaction is positively associated with mentor instrumental support.

Originality/value

This study expands Lent et al.'s (2015) social cognitive career model by providing an analysis of independent parallel mediation paths to examine the direct link between mentor support experiences and career optimism through self-efficacy and school satisfaction. Based on the findings, graduate programs should emphasize the importance of mentor support experiences and help graduate faculty explore how they can best provide mentor experiences to their mentees.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Ahmad Raza Bilal, Tehreem Fatima, Khyzer Bin Dost and Muhammad Kashif Imran

Students' satisfaction is termed as their subjective evaluation of the fulfillment of expectations and pleasure experienced from the teaching services. This study intends…

Abstract

Purpose

Students' satisfaction is termed as their subjective evaluation of the fulfillment of expectations and pleasure experienced from the teaching services. This study intends to examine the role of teachers' work engagement in inculcating students' satisfaction from their teachers taking a self-determination perspective. It moreover highlights the underlying mechanisms of teacher–student interaction and teachers' sensitivity.

Design/methodology/approach

We used 278 valid and matched responses from teachers and students of higher secondary/intermediate/degree colleges operating in Pakistan through multi-stage sampling. The data were gathered in three waves and multiple mediation analysis was conducted using PROCESS model 4 to analyze the data and infer results.

Findings

The results revealed that college teachers' work engagement (i.e. vigor, dedication and absorption) is required to create their willingness and motivation to invest in effective pedagogical decisions and inculcate students' satisfaction. This engagement, in turn, improves their interaction with students and makes them more sensitive in meeting the needs of students that causes students to have satisfying educational experiences.

Originality/value

This research has taken a unique standpoint of considering teachers' engagement as a precursor of students' satisfaction, in contrast to the prior focus on assessing the role of institutional dynamics, demographics and teachers' competence. It has also unraveled the role of teachers' sensitivity and student–teacher interaction in the above-mentioned association based on self-determination theory (SDT). Moreover, it has emphasized the teaching dynamics and its outcomes in the college sector instead of the much-examined university and school settings.

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