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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Kevin M. Baird and Venkateshwaran Narayanan

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a change in teaching structure in improving the performance of students in an introductory management…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a change in teaching structure in improving the performance of students in an introductory management accounting subject at an Australian institution. The change in structure involved a shift in the balance between lecture and tutorial face‐to‐face contact hours with increased emphasis being placed on tutorials in an attempt to enhance the benefits of cooperative learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates the success of the new approach by comparing the performance of students across the two teaching structures. Specifically, the paper compares the performance of students on exam questions covering five key management accounting topics.

Findings

The results revealed that the new teaching structure (a two‐hour workshop‐based tutorial and a one‐hour lecture each week) improved student examination results significantly in comparison to the previous “traditional” approach.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the benefits of teaching and learning conducted in a small class size setting with the use of cooperative learning. Such an approach could be adopted more widely in the teaching and learning of accounting to enhance the generic and analytic skills of students.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence to support largely normative claims that cooperative learning when combined with greater focus on small class teaching can improve student performance.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

John Garger, Michael Thomas and Paul H. Jacques

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the predictive validity of several antecedents to students' early perceptions of future performance in collegiate courses.

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1388

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the predictive validity of several antecedents to students' early perceptions of future performance in collegiate courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A non‐experimental design was used to test a proposed model based on a review of relevant literature. Students completed surveys capturing the constructs researched.

Findings

Students' internal locus of control predicted student perceptions of social integration, academic self concept and grade point average (GPA) and social integration significantly predicted academic self concept. Moreover, academic self concept significantly predicted early perceptions of expected grade beyond the student's current level of performance as measured by his/her current GPA.

Research limitations/implications

Subjects were from one academic program in one university. Also, expected performance was measured with one item, which focused on expected grade, only one aspect of performance. Other aspects of performance and outcomes such as perceived learning or satisfaction with the course could shed more light on the relationships among the constructs under study

Practical implications

Students with an internal locus of control orientation can better leverage self‐confidence to social and academic ends in the classroom and more readily exhibit the sustained goal‐related behaviors requisite for success during transitions to college and subsequent professional placements. Also, students who are encouraged to take personal responsibility for relationships with peers and adjust behaviors are likely to maintain and enhance the quality of these relationships.

Originality/value

The paper's results suggest that instructors who foster/reinforce students' concept of connections between choices and outcomes may be rewarded with enhanced student motivation to perform well in the course.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Saw Fen Tan, Arathai Din Eak, Li Hsien Ooi and Anna Christina Abdullah

The purpose of this study aims to compare the academic performance and types of learning strategies used by APEL and regular entry undergraduates. It also explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study aims to compare the academic performance and types of learning strategies used by APEL and regular entry undergraduates. It also explored the relationship between the academic performance and the types of learning strategies utilised by these two groups of undergraduate.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative study involved 400 undergraduates from an open distance learning (ODL) institution. A correlational research design was used in this study. Data were collected through archival data and questionnaire. Independent t-test and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed using SPSS.

Findings

Regular entrants were found to perform slightly better than APEL entrants. There is no significant difference between the types of learning strategies used by APEL and regular entrants. For both groups, the higher performers adopted time and study environment management as well as effort regulation strategies. Besides this, there was no correlation between cognitive skills and peer learning with their academic performance. Meta-cognitive self-regulation and help-seeking which were found to affect the regular entrants’ academic performance did not correlate with those of APEL entrants.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted within only one institution. The generalisation of findings may therefore be limited. Future studies could be conducted to include students from several institutions.

Practical implications

Time management training could be provided to students. Additional support, like foundation courses and supplementary readings, could be provided to APEL entrants to support their learning.

Originality/value

The findings would be beneficial to ODL institutions who offer APEL entry to understand the academic performance and learning strategies used by APEL entrants relative to regular entrants.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Elizabeth V. Grace and Thomas G. Black

We explore the validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores and grade point averages (GPAs) for predicting comprehensive student performance in an…

Abstract

We explore the validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores and grade point averages (GPAs) for predicting comprehensive student performance in an accelerated-cohort masters of accountancy (MA) program from 2002 through 2009. We confirm findings of prior studies that graduate accounting student performance increases in GMAT scores and undergraduate GPAs; however, undergraduate GPA is significant only for U.S. students. International student performance is overwhelmingly explained by language ability, as measured by GMAT verbal and analytical writing scores. When performance is defined as job placement with a public accounting firm after graduation, we find no significant association between performance and either GMAT scores or undergraduate GPA. Additionally, the factors that are significantly associated with obtaining a job in public accounting differ for U.S. and international students. These findings may have implications for admission decisions and curriculum design of U.S. graduate accounting programs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-223-4

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2014

Carmen Giorgiana Bonaci, Răzvan V. Mustaţă, Alexandra Muţiu and Jiří Strouhal

We propose a research design involving the use of Bloom’s taxonomy both in facilitating the teaching–learning process and in the educator assessing students’ final grades…

Abstract

Purpose

We propose a research design involving the use of Bloom’s taxonomy both in facilitating the teaching–learning process and in the educator assessing students’ final grades. The latter are compared with students’ self-acknowledged grades. Testing is done by considering a sample of accounting students enrolled for the Controlling course in Romania.

Methodology/approach

The employed research methodology relies on two instruments: a questionnaire and the examination process. Cluster analysis is used in analyzing students’ grades. Determinants of students’ academic performance are discussed by using factor analysis.

Findings

Comparing students’ self-acknowledged grades with those assessed by the educator, we document the necessity of further work in enhancing students’ ability to better assess their academic performance. Questions belonging to the application and analysis levels seem to be preferred by students.

Practical implications

We raise a series of theoretical questions in the area of examination performance. The obtained results in relation to the assessment of accounting students’ academic performance and its determinants offer useful insights for accounting educators.

Originality/value of chapter

Our chapter tests the use of Bloom’s taxonomy in the context of an emerging country’s educational system that lacked consistency and faced significant challenges throughout history. We also consider two measures for students’ academic performance as perceptions upon what should be the same result of the teaching–learning process. The chapter addresses the evolutions and particularities of the Romanian academic environment in the area of economics, developing a brief analysis meant to position the testing of the proposed research design.

Details

Accounting in Central and Eastern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-939-3

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Paul Sander, David Putwain and Jesús de la Fuente

This chapter argues that there are many, just many many variables which contribute to academic performance as measured in degree outcome, and, as such, simple bivariate…

Abstract

This chapter argues that there are many, just many many variables which contribute to academic performance as measured in degree outcome, and, as such, simple bivariate analysis is inappropriate. We use structural equation modelling, and explore the contribution of academic behavioural confidence, to make the point that it does contribute to academic performance, but to a lesser extent than self-efficacy theory argues. We suggest that this is because degree outcome is made up of many efficacy variables, which we argue are better captured overall in academic behavioural confidence.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-682-8

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Sunyoung Park and Petra A. Robinson

The purpose of this study is to examine how academic coaches, through academic student support, impact graduate student performance in a time-intensive online learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how academic coaches, through academic student support, impact graduate student performance in a time-intensive online learning program for pursuing a master’s degree in leadership and human resource development in a research-intensive public university in the Southern USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in this study were 435 graduate students enrolled in their online master’s degree program. Framed by the theory of transactional distance and by adopting a pre-experimental design and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique, the student performance in three courses was compared (principles of adult education, research methods and performance analysis) with academic coaches.

Findings

The findings indicate that the average score of students was higher when students received more feedback and comments from an academic coach than less feedback and comments in the performance analysis course. Students who had an academic coach in the adult education class performed better than those who did not have a coach. However, there was not a significant difference in academic performance based on the number of academic coaches (one versus three) in the research methods course.

Originality/value

This preliminary work may lead to a better understanding of how academic coaches can best support adult learners in their pursuits of online postsecondary education. This study would suggest implications for online instructors and institutions to enhance student success and retention in online learning activities by using academic coaching.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Neha Garg, Asim Talukdar, Anirban Ganguly and Chitresh Kumar

This study aims to investigate the role of knowledge hiding (KH) on academic performance, using three antecedents – relatedness with peers, territoriality of knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the role of knowledge hiding (KH) on academic performance, using three antecedents – relatedness with peers, territoriality of knowledge and performance motivation. It also looked into the moderating role of academic self-efficacy upon student’s KH behavior and academic performance. The research was grounded on the theory of reasoned action.

Design/methodology/approachx

Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze the five hypotheses. The data was collected through a primary survey based on a structured questionnaire with a sample size of 324 students from the Indian higher education institutions.

Findings

The study found that performance motivation and territoriality are positively associated with KH, which is further positively related to students’ academic performance. Sense of relatedness had no influence upon KH behavior, implying that proximity of social relationships does not predict KH behavior among students. Additionally, it was also observed that while evasive (a situation where the knowledge hider deliberately provides incorrect, partial or misleading information) and rationalized KH (a situation where the knowledge hider tries to provide a rational justification for not sharing the knowledge) had a significant influence on the academic performance of the students, the effect of “playing dumb” was not significant. The study did not reveal any moderating effect of academic self-efficacy on all three forms of KH and academic performance.

Practical implications

The findings of the study are expected to be valuable for instructors, administrative authorities and policymakers at the higher education level, to create a more conducive teaching and learning environment. Out of the three hiding strategies, students indulge more often in rationalized KH. Based on the outcomes of this research, management may focus toward the creation of an institutional environment conducive toward knowledge sharing interdependency among students.

Originality/value

One of the novel contributions of this study is that it analyzes Indian higher education, providing a developing country perspective, thereby contributing to the body of knowledge in knowledge management and hiding. The study also intends to understand the interplay of constructs such as KH, territoriality, sense of relatedness and academic performance, which have not been discussed previously within the higher education context, thus making the research work original. The study was done among the students and hence, brings in the academic perspective in the KH literature, which has seen limited research impetus.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Alka Pandita and Ravi Kiran

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in decision-making and employee engagement demonstrating benefits for universities such as increased employee attraction, higher retention, greater productivity and improved student service. Higher education institutions that offer development opportunities to their faculty are likely to have less turnover than those that do not. Globally tuned curriculum matching the expectation of students one hand and developing a conducive environment for implementing the changes on the other hand is the need of the hour. Branding and student employability needs the focus of policymakers, and it can highly impact the visibility of institute.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has been undertaken to examine the role of critical success factors (CSFs) for augmenting quality of higher education institutes in India. The aspects considered are: branding, employability, employee experience, student experience. The study tries to analyse their impact on overall performance. The results highlight that academic culture mediates between student experience and overall performance. The current research also indicates that academic culture mediates between employee experience and overall performance. Employee experience through academic culture emerges as a strongest predictor of overall performance. Student experience through academic culture emerges as another important predictor of overall performance. Employability was next to follow. The beta values were low for branding. The results highlight that for improving performance Indian higher educational institutes need to focus on branding. Implementing this model will enable educational institutions to focus on these predictors to boost overall performance and equip engineers with requisite skills through academic culture.

Findings

The results show that employee experience is the most importance significant performance indicator to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs. However, branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Research limitations/implications

Competition is spreading in the higher education sector with widespread consequences, and in order to effectively respond to the pressures, universities have to be able to draw attention and retain their precious human capital. Developing linkages for faculty and student will generate mutually beneficial sustainable outcomes. Institutes preferably be multi-disciplinary or inter-disciplinary and have both teaching and research focus of an exceptionally high quality. Developing diverse programmes and activities targeting at developing quality of mind, ethical standard, social awareness and global perspectives, let the students shape their own experience and growth. Solid linkages with industry to impart a practical dimension to technical training is must, and an effective semester internship in industry is a testimony of project-led teaching. Research excellence and quality teaching are the basis of quality education. Engagement in external collaborations that extend and deepen institution impact through increasing international engagements. In future, empirical studies can also be conducted on the AQAR model by collecting data through questionnaires based on the perception of students, and it can be tested through hypotheses employing R software to determine the extent of implementation of AQAR in EEIs in India.

Practical implications

The results show that employee experience is the most important significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Originality/value

The results show that student experience is the most importance significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator. The direct effect of student experience (Beta = 0.101) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.412). The employee experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Manish Gupta and Arnold B. Bakker

The objective of this study is to understand the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance. In addition, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to understand the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance. In addition, the study examines the interaction effect of group cohesion task with student engagement on group performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 170 (a total of 34 groups of five members each) business management students for three consecutive months. To analyze the data, multi-level modeling was carried out.

Findings

The results of the three-wave multi-level analysis indicate support for the hypotheses and suggest that future time perspective affects group performance through student engagement. Moreover, group cohesion interacts with student engagement to predict group task performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show how the application of engagement theory can help in understanding the relationship between two distant variables, namely, future time perspective and group performance.

Practical implications

The educators are encouraged to engage students for facilitating the positive impact of future time perspective on group task performance. The findings also imply that the students with future orientation perform well and thus, the educators may need to teach students to have futuristic perspective.

Originality/value

This study in one of its kinds to test the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance as well as the interaction effect of group cohesion task with student engagement on group performance at both the individual and group level over a period of time.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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