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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Majid Al-Amri

Research has demonstrated that high percentages of undergraduate college students self-report they engage in academic procrastination which has significant adverse effects…

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that high percentages of undergraduate college students self-report they engage in academic procrastination which has significant adverse effects on academic progress with relative consistency. The present study was designed to help English as a foreign language (EFL) procrastinators study on a regular basis, and also to extend the learning of the high achievers. To do so, seventy English as a Foreign Language students in the study were classified by level of procrastination based on scores on the Procrastination Scale (Tuckman, 1991). Half of the students experienced the student-led seminars condition; the other half experienced the assignments condition. Although the student-led seminars condition produced significantly higher scores overall on a final achievement examination than the outline condition did, a significant interaction between condition and student procrastination level reflected an almost 14% advantage for the student-led seminars condition among high procrastinators. There was almost no difference between student-led seminars and assignments conditions for medium and low procrastinators. In addition, the qualitative data revealed high levels of satisfaction among students in the experimental group regarding the seminars and the instructor, as well as the perceived amount of new information learned.

ﻟﻘد أﺛﺑﺗ ت اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﺎ ت اﻟ ﺳ ﺎﺑﻘﺔ ا ر ﺗﻔﺎ ع ﻧ ﺳ ﺑ ﺔ اﻟﺗ ﺳ وﯾ ف ا ﻷ ﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ﻟ د ى ط ﻼ ب اﻟ ﺟ ﺎ ﻣﻌﺎ ت و ﺗﺄﺛﯾ ر ه اﻟ ﺳ ﻠﺑ ﻲ ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﺗﺣﺻ ﯾﻠ ﮭم ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾ ﻣ ﻲ. ﻟذ ﻟ ك ﺗم ﺗﺻﻣﯾم ھذه اﻟدرا ﺳﺔ ﻟﻐر ض ﻣﺳﺎ ﻋدة اﻟﻣﺳوﻓﯾ ن أﻛﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﯾ ﺎً ﻣ ن ط ﻼ ب ا ﻟ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ ا ﻹ ﻧ ﺟ ﻠ ﯾ ز ﯾ ﺔ ﻛ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ أ ﺟ ﻧ ﺑ ﯾ ﺔ وﻛ ذﻟ ك ﻟﺗﻌزﯾ ز ﻣ ﺳﺗ و ى اﻟ طﻼب ذو ي اﻟ ﺗ ﺣﺻ ﯾل ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾﻣﻲ اﻟﻣرﺗﻔﻊ. وا ﺷﺗﻣﻠ ت ﻋ ﯾ ﻧ ﺔ ا ﻟ ﺑ ﺣ ث ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﺳ ﺑ ﻌ ﯾ ن ط ﺎ ﻟ ﺑ ﺎً ﻣ ن ط ﻼ ب ا ﻟ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ ا ﻹ ﻧ ﺟ ﻠ ﯾ ز ﯾ ﺔ ﻛ ﻠ ﻐ ﺔ أ ﺟ ﻧ ﺑ ﯾ ﺔ ﻓ ﻲ ا ﻟ ﻣ ر ﺣ ﻠ ﺔ ا ﻟ ﺟ ﺎ ﻣ ﻌ ﯾ ﺔ . وﺗ م ﺗﻘ ﺳﯾم اﻟ طﻼب ﺑﻧ ﺎ ء ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻣﻘ ﯾﺎ س اﻟﺗ ﺳوﯾ ف ) Tuckman, 1991 ( اﻟ ﻰ ﺛﻼث ﻣ ﺳﺗ وﯾﺎ ت: ﻋﺎﻟ ﻲ، ﻣﺗ وﺳط، وﻣﻧ ﺧﻔ ض ، وﺗم ا ﺳﺗ ﺧدام اﻟﺣ ﻠﻘﺎ ت اﻟد ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ اﻟ ﺗ ﻲ ﯾﻘ و دھ ﺎ اﻟط ﺎﻟ ب ﻣﻊ إ ﺣ د ى اﻟ ﺷ ﻌ ب اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ ) 30 طﺎ ﻟ ب(، وﺗم أ ﺳﺗ ﺧدام اﻟ وا ﺟﺑﺎ ت اﻟد را ﺳﯾﺔ ﻣﻊ طﻼب اﻟ ﺷﻌﺑﺔ اﻷﺧر ى. أظﮭر ت اﻟد را ﺳﺔ ﻓﺎﻋ ﻠﯾ ﺔ اﻟ ﺣ ﻠﻘﺎت اﻟ د ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ اﻟﺗ ﻲ ﯾﻘ ودھﺎ اﻟ ط ﺎﻟ ب ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ا ﻷ دا ء ا ﻷ ﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ﻟ د ى اﻟ ط ﻼب ﻓ ﻲ اﻟﻣﺟﻣوﻋﺔ اﻟ ﺗ ﺟ ر ﯾﺑﯾ ﺔ و ﺧ ﺻ و ﺻ ﺎً ﻟ د ى ا ﻟ ط ﻼ ب ذ و ا ﻟ ﻣ ﺳ ﺗ و ى ا ﻟ ﻌ ﺎ ﻟ ﻲ ﻣ ن ا ﻟ ﺗ ﺳ و ﯾ ف ا ﻷ ﻛ ﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ) 14 %( . ﻛذﻟ ك أ ظﮭر ت اﻟدرا ﺳﺔ ر ﺿﺎ اﻟ طﻼب ﻋن اﻟ ﺣﻠﻘﺎ ت اﻟد ر ا ﺳ ﯾ ﺔ و أ ﺳ ﺗﺎ ذ اﻟﻣﻘ ر ر و ﻛذﻟ ك ﻛﻣﯾ ﺔ اﻟﻣﻌر ﻓﺔ اﻟﺟ دﯾدة اﻟ ﺗ ﻲ ﺗم ا ﻛﺗ ﺳ ﺎﺑ ﮭﺎ.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Aidan Davison, Paul Brown, Emma Pharo, Kristin Warr, Helen McGregor, Sarah Terkes, Davina Boyd and Pamela Abuodha

Interdisciplinary approaches to climate change teaching are well justified and arise from the complexity of climate change challenges and the integrated problem-solving…

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5463

Abstract

Purpose

Interdisciplinary approaches to climate change teaching are well justified and arise from the complexity of climate change challenges and the integrated problem-solving responses they demand. These approaches require academic teachers to collaborate across disciplines. Yet, the fragmentation typical of universities impedes collaborative teaching practice. This paper aims to report on the outcomes of a distributed leadership project in four Australian universities aimed at enhancing interdisciplinary climate change teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Communities of teaching practice were established at four Australian universities with participants drawn from a wide range of disciplines. The establishment and operation of these communities relied on a distributed leadership methodology which facilitates acts of initiative, innovation, vision and courage through group interaction rather than through designated hierarchical roles.

Findings

Each community of practice found the distributed leadership approach overcame barriers to interdisciplinary climate change teaching. Cultivating distributed leadership enabled community members to engage in peer-led professional learning, collaborative curriculum and pedagogical development, and to facilitate wider institutional change. The detailed outcomes achieved by each community were tailored to their specific institutional context. They included the transformation of climate change curriculum, professional development in interdisciplinary pedagogy, innovation in student-led learning activities, and participation in institutional decision-making related to curriculum reform.

Originality/value

Collaborative, non-traditional leadership practices have attracted little attention in research about sustainability education in university curricula. This paper demonstrates that the distributed leadership model for sustainability education reported here is effective in building capacity for interdisciplinary climate change teaching within disciplines. The model is flexible enough for a variety of institutional settings.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2005

Janet Alleman

This chapter describes a unique model used by one teacher educator to provide an authentic process for assessing student learning and observing how students represent…

Abstract

This chapter describes a unique model used by one teacher educator to provide an authentic process for assessing student learning and observing how students represent themselves as teachers to their families. The student-led parent conference is a means of making learning more viable and more intrinsically motivating because it incorporates elements of choice and a real audience for evaluation. A powerful by-product is the credibility it can give to at least one recommendation university professors often make about what classroom teachers should do.

Details

Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Sakiko Okayama

This paper aims to explain the student-led environmental management system (EMS) based on ISO14001 which Chiba University has continued for 15 years. It describes its…

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1597

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the student-led environmental management system (EMS) based on ISO14001 which Chiba University has continued for 15 years. It describes its structure “Chiba University Method”, the students’ activities and their collaboration with companies. It also analyzes the advantages and the issues. Readers can reconsider these mechanisms and results to examine whether they could introduce the student-led EMS in their own university.

Design/methodology/approach

Four critical points are explained concerning the “Chiba University Method”. The advantages are analyzed by the data and the questionnaire survey.

Findings

It has been found that student-led EMS has an effect of practical education on the students and an improvement of social evaluation on the university, as well as a reduction of environmental burdens. For students, in addition to the direct merit of obtaining credits, they receive a sense of accomplishment through gaining practical experience, thereby realizing improvements in business skills and making friends through activities. These are good incentives to participating in various activities. However, there are also problems that occur due to student-led EMS, and it is necessary for faculties to be aware and correspond with them.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on the experience of one Japanese University.

Social implications

As this case falls under the practical case of active learning, it is expected that other universities could also introduce this system.

Originality/value

It is rare that the students manage the EMS based on ISO14001 with educational effects included in the results. At Chiba University, moreover, students are making environmental contributions to local communities through collaboration with companies.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2011

Theresa Mercer, Andrew Kythreotis, Carol Lambert and Gill Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significance of student‐led initiatives in PhD development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significance of student‐led initiatives in PhD development.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is presented utilizing Kolb's model of learning from experience to identify with student‐led research training within the PhD process.

Findings

The experiential role of the student in the development of their personal doctoral training and the resultant social interactions thereof, remain as important as the more structured supervisor‐student relationship and other forms of doctoral training within the PhD research process.

Originality/value

This paper contributes new insights into the process of how PhD students can become more empowered by the process of “doing” a PhD, rather than being confined to their own specific discipline, whilst offering future recommendations for students embarking upon PhD research.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Anastasia Luise Gramatakos and Stephanie Lavau

Many higher education institutions are committed to developing students as skilled professionals and responsible citizens for a more sustainable future. In addition to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Many higher education institutions are committed to developing students as skilled professionals and responsible citizens for a more sustainable future. In addition to the formal curriculum for sustainability education, there is an increasing interest in informal learning within universities. This paper aims to extend the current understanding of the diversity and significance of informal learning experiences in supporting students’ learning for sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Six focus groups were formed with 30 undergraduate and postgraduate students from an Australian higher education institution committed to supporting graduate competencies for sustainability. An inductive and qualitative inquiry was designed to enable participants to reflect on the ways in which their university experiences support meaningful and significant learning for sustainability.

Findings

The paper presents a typology of the diverse communities of informal learning that students create and engage with. These range from ongoing to transient groups, from environmentally to more socially oriented groups and from incidental to intended learning, from local to national in scale, with varying types and degrees of connection to the formal curriculum and the university campus. The paper demonstrates that these student-led experiences support three domains of learning: cognitive, practical and affective.

Originality/value

Deepening the understanding of the forms and significance of student-led learning within their university experience contributes to the identification of the roles that informal learning may play alongside formal education in developing graduates as agents of change for a more sustainable future.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Gerwyn Huw Jones

The purpose of this paper is to investigate undergraduate pre-registration mental health nurse’s satisfaction with problem-based learning (PBL), in light of the dearth of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate undergraduate pre-registration mental health nurse’s satisfaction with problem-based learning (PBL), in light of the dearth of such studies and to influence future teaching and learning strategies within Cardiff University.

Design/methodology/approach

Totally, 16 students from three cohorts were interviewed in two focus groups. Data analysis was consistent with Seidel and Kelle (1995) which involved noticing relevant phenomena, collecting examples of these phenomena and subsequently analysing these to find commonalities, differences, patterns and structures.

Findings

Student experiences were categorised in five themes indicating that they perceived PBL as a novel, flexible approach to adult learning, which fostered decision making and critical thinking. Student engagement with the process was heavily influenced by the contribution of the end product to their degree classification. They also expressed concerns about working in groups and whether the depth of learning was comparable with traditional methods. However, they presented well-considered recommendations for future practice to address the perceived deficits of PBL.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small scale study undertaken in one institution. As such the views expressed by students relate to the approach to PBL used in this institution.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of research relating to the application of PBL in mental health nurse education. Well considered, student generated recommendations are presented which can enhance student motivation, engagement and learning. These are arguably of value to other educationists interested in this approach to teaching and learning.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Sharon Boyd

This chapter will review teaching approaches used to develop students’ professional skills in preparation for their future role as veterinary practitioners. These…

Abstract

This chapter will review teaching approaches used to develop students’ professional skills in preparation for their future role as veterinary practitioners. These approaches support student development beyond the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS. (2014). Day one competences. Retrieved from http://www.rcvs.org.uk/document-library/day-one-competences/) Day One Competences expected of graduates, and emphasize the key importance of life-long skills and resilience in a rapidly changing world.

As veterinary leaders, they will be expected to demonstrate skills in multidisciplinary group facilitation and community engagement. From a global perspective, students are encouraged to reflect on their learning in light of the impact on their local communities and the wider impact on the global ecosystem. This chapter provides an overview of how professional skills are developed over the course of the undergraduate program. Such approaches guide students as they learn to confront and engage with cognitive dissonance (CD) inherent to the role of the veterinary surgeon in practice. Areas where CD is clearly evident in practice will be considered, followed by a review of the teaching approaches to prepare students.

The teaching methods described will include the benefits and challenges of work-based placements, opportunities for self-development and reflection within a tightly packed curriculum, and the importance of facilitating student-led activities to build skills in leadership.

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Theresa G. Mercer, Andrew P. Kythreotis, Zoe P. Robinson, Terje Stolte, Sharon M. George and Stephanie K. Haywood

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

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2107

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study on the creation, development and utilisation of educational games by university students is presented. The paper discusses the case study in the context of Kolb’s experiential learning and dynamic matching model, Perry’s stages of intellectual development and Beech and Macintosh’s processual learning model. The data used were from questionnaire feedback from the pupils who played the games and students who designed the games. Further qualitative feedback was collected from local schools involved in playing the games created by the students.

Findings

Overall, the students responded positively to the assessment and would like to see more of this type of assessment. They enjoyed the creativity involved and the process of developing the games. For the majority of the skill sets measured, most students found that their skills improved slightly. Many students felt that they had learnt a lot about effectively communicating science. The school children involved in playing the student-created games found them accessible with variable degrees of effectiveness as engaging learning tools dependent on the game.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new approach to ESD which incorporates learner-centred arrangements within a full life cycle of game creation, delivery, playing and back to creation. The games can be used as a tool for enhancing knowledge and influencing behaviours in school children whilst enhancing ESD capacity in schools. The assessment also helps forge important links between the academic and local communities to enhance sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Naglaa Megahed

Since the teaching of architecture is now carried out in architectural studios with the critique session as the core of its assessment, the aim of this paper is to analyse…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the teaching of architecture is now carried out in architectural studios with the critique session as the core of its assessment, the aim of this paper is to analyse architecture students’ attitudes, satisfaction levels and experiences in terms of different critique and assessment methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on two main approaches – the literature and questionnaire survey. In addition, the study relies on the author’s personal observations in design studio teaching and as a practitioner of the method.

Findings

It is important to establish clear goals for design critique and assessment and to include different critique methodologies – self critique, peer critique, group critique and professional critique. All such methodologies should be undertaken in an interactive environment that facilitates communication and exchange of scholarly thoughts among students, instructors and other professionals.

Practical implications

The study involves the investigation of students’ responses and reactions to the various critique methodologies and their underlying practices in the context of Egypt. This is based on the questionnaire survey undertaken by the author in 2016. The questionnaire is designed to generate both qualitative and quantitative data.

Social implications

This study aims to understand the students’ perspective about their design experiences with regard to studio-based learning and its impact on their education.

Originality/value

While the topic of design critique about students has been studied heavily in the Western world, there is a lack of similar information in most Egyptian universities. To fill this gap, the Architecture Program at Port Said University was closely observed.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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